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Estes Yankee

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GreatWhite

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Anybody have one or build one? I just picked up one for my first kit to put together. The club that I am going to start flying at has a 1500' limit because of its location. What engine would you guys reccomend for around 1000' elevation.

Thanks!
 

Gillard

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A C6 will get a yankee to 1400 feet, so a B6-6 will be closest to a 1000 foot.
the instructions usually give predicted hieghts with motors.
 

Bone Daddy

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Not sure how big your field is, how windy it will be, number of trees, etc, but I would fly it on an A8-3 to start with. That way you're practically guaranteed to get it back for another flight. You may even find that max altitude may not be your cup of tea. Once your rocket is too high to see, it makes no difference whether it is at 1,000 or 1,500 or whatever. Once you can't see it, you can't see it.

I like to watch the rocket turn over and pop its chute or streamer.

(disclaimer: I know, the higher the better, the more altitude the more the attitude, etc. I'm not discounting the thrill of piercing the sky and touching the proverbial face of God. I'm just suggesting it might be better to take it easy to start with.)
 

GreatWhite

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Thanks for the replys! I agree with you Bone Daddy I think I will stay with the "A" class motors for this particular rocket.
 

dragon_rider10

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I just bought one of these myself, I'm sure I had one as a kid though. My kit was missing 2 parts, so working with Estes for replacements. I was considering modifying it to use cheaper 13mm engines instead.
 

GreatWhite

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What do you mean by the "cheaper 13mm engines".

Thanks!

-Patrick
 

The EGE

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What do you mean by the "cheaper 13mm engines".

Thanks!

-Patrick
13mm motors come in 4-packs; 18mm motors come in 3-packs. Usually the packs of 1/2A and A motors are the same price for both 13mm and 18mm versions, so by buying only 13mm motors in those sizes you get 33% for motor for your money.
 

Gillard

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13mm motors come in 4-packs; 18mm motors come in 3-packs. Usually the packs of 1/2A and A motors are the same price for both 13mm and 18mm versions, so by buying only 13mm motors in those sizes you get 33% for motor for your money.
and there's not alot of difference between an A10-3T and a A8-3, so build an adapter and save a few $
 

gpoehlein

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I don't remember which issue it appeared in, but there was a really nifty 13mm to 18mm adapter that appeared in one issue of the Apogee online magazine. It breaks into two halves with a motor block at each end to hold the small motor in place - just tape the halves together. Light weight and works really well. True, you can use a hollowed out 18mm motor as an adapter, but I think the Apogee adapter is lighter. (It uses a 2-3/4" length of BT-5, three 520 centering rings and two BT-5 motor blocks.)

Go to the Apogee web site and pull up the list of newsletter back issues - it is in there somewhere! ;)
 

SpaceAXEplorer

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I don't remember which issue it appeared in, but there was a really nifty 13mm to 18mm adapter that appeared in one issue of the Apogee online magazine. It breaks into two halves with a motor block at each end to hold the small motor in place - just tape the halves together. Light weight and works really well. True, you can use a hollowed out 18mm motor as an adapter, but I think the Apogee adapter is lighter. (It uses a 2-3/4" length of BT-5, three 520 centering rings and two BT-5 motor blocks.)

Go to the Apogee web site and pull up the list of newsletter back issues - it is in there somewhere! ;)
YEP!

I've taken an 18 mm and sometimes used a hobby (Xacto type) knife to hollow it out a bit, by removing a few paper layers. I then use cardstock to make a new thrust ring, and voila! Instant conversion to use 13's instead of A8's!
It really does work quite well.
 

j.a.duke

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I just bought one of these myself, I'm sure I had one as a kid though. My kit was missing 2 parts, so working with Estes for replacements. I was considering modifying it to use cheaper 13mm engines instead.
I built my Yankee with a 13mm mount; didn't bother with the 18mm option.

It goes plenty high on an A10.

Cheers,
Jon
 

dragon_rider10

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I don't remember which issue it appeared in, but there was a really nifty 13mm to 18mm adapter that appeared in one issue of the Apogee online magazine. It breaks into two halves with a motor block at each end to hold the small motor in place - just tape the halves together. Light weight and works really well. True, you can use a hollowed out 18mm motor as an adapter, but I think the Apogee adapter is lighter. (It uses a 2-3/4" length of BT-5, three 520 centering rings and two BT-5 motor blocks.)

Go to the Apogee web site and pull up the list of newsletter back issues - it is in there somewhere! ;)
Found it! Issue 227!
 

GreatWhite

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I am hoping to take the time this weekend and get this kit assembled and painted. I will post pictures of the completed project when I am done. Thanks for all of the help and ideas!

-Patrick
 
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