Estes E2X Shred

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r_swider

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My son and I went out to launch a few rockets this past weekend. We sent up a couple of the all-plastic E2X ships. All went well with one of them, but the other literally exploded when the ejection charge went off.

The nosecone fit well and we used A3-4Ts for both rockets. Any ideas on why it shreded?

We used Testor liquid cement for both rockets, I'm wondering if we should have used tube cement instead?

Here's a poor quality picture of the remains. The engine tube couldn't be found...
 
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Its possible that the glue you used wasn't strong enough to hold together against the force of the ejection. My recommendation, as far as glue goes, is Ambroid Pro-Weld. It doesn't "glue" plastic, but it actually "welds" the parts together and it sets in less than a minute.It dries within seconds of contact with the air, so you don't have to worry about the glue running and defacing your model. Just makes sure that the cover is on tight or it will completely evaporate by the morning.

There are alot of other reasons your rocket disintegrated. but judging from the picture this seems, to me, the most likley cause.
 

gpoehlein

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I'm curious how you glued the rocket halves together with the liquid cement - if done properly, even Testor's liquid cement "welds" the plastic together.

The proper technique (learned from my plastic modeling days) is to place the two pieces together and flow the cement into the gap between the two pieces. If you simply paint the cement on the surfaces to be glued and then press them together (as you would with tube glue), most of the glue evaporates and the plastic re-hardens before it even comes together and has a chance to bond. Tube glue is usually a similar solvent to liquid cement, but it has some styrene already disolved in it, which keeps it from evaporating as fast.

When using liquid cement, you can tell that you've done it right by squeezing the two pieces tightly together and having a little melted plastic ooze out of the gap. This little bead can easily be removed after the parts have dried either by scraping with an xacto blade or by filing and sanding. (Don't try to cut with the blade, you'll only gouge the plastic. Instead, hold the blade perpendicular to the piece and scrape it across - called adzing.)

Greg
 

mkmilion

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I also own the Estes Space Hauler. I've ran into this problem twice. The first time I used plastic cement (tube) and it held for believe it or not 10 lauches. Until enevitalbly it halfed. So I used good ol' Krazy glue the next time and it held for 17 lanches. Then blew apart.
So I believe it'll eventually blow due to regular wear. Might I add I still have mine, except I'm waiting on a new EMT from BMS.
I'd like to suggest that if you repair it, I don't know how you did your wadding, take one of your recovery wadding sheets and cut it into fourths and stuff three of them in there. I found that this doesn't over presurize it and allows enough wadding to protect the streamer.
On a final note I'd like to suggest if you are to repair it then scape off as much burn and corosion as you can it makes for better gluing surface.
I hoped this helps. L8ters.
 

sandman

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I got mine at Hobby Lobby for half price.

Gee, it was only $2. 17 flights for $2 is a pretty good deal.

But send the pic to Estes...they always seem to make it right.

sandman
 

Stymye

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It's what I call a disposable rocket ( sorta like a Bic lighter)

after so many ejection pops.the hard plastic breaks somewhere
usually the joint
you just toss it and get annother

I have 3 of them for backyard flyers... one change tho...
I swapped the elastic for a longer piece of kevlar thread
 

r_swider

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Originally posted by gpoehlein
I'm curious how you glued the rocket halves together with the liquid cement - if done properly, even Testor's liquid cement "welds" the plastic together.

If you simply paint the cement on the surfaces to be glued and then press them together (as you would with tube glue), most of the glue evaporates and the plastic re-hardens before it even comes together and has a chance to bond.
That's exactly how we did it. I didn't realize that it evaporated like that. We still have one that is unbuilt. I'll give your suggestion a try. Thanks!
 

r_swider

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Originally posted by Nighteagle2001
My recommendation, as far as glue goes, is Ambroid Pro-Weld.
Would the average hobby shop carry that glue?
 

DNoal

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r_swider,

I have been extremely pleased with the "Tidal Wave" RTF Estes rocket I purchased. It has 8 or so flights and no visible marks or dings. (even after coming down in the woods and being stuck in a tree.)

While it is more expensive than $2 (it can be had at ToysRUs in our area for $14.99, comes with 2 motors, ignitors, wadding, shute, controller and pad) it seems like it is gonna last a while. Plus it flys really well.

Also, it requires NO construction, beyond attaching the chute.

I am sure I will enjoying launching it for a long time.
 

Mike

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Originally posted by DNoal
I have been extremely pleased with the "Tidal Wave" RTF Estes rocket I purchased. It has 8 or so flights and no visible marks or dings. (even after coming down in the woods and being stuck in a tree.
The starter set rockets do seem to really durable, mine stripped 7 out of 8 shorud line and streamered in from 180m (according to Estes!) yet it was fine. That said I did get a stress mark along the root of one fin after it hit a stone on after its first flight. I filleted the fins with plastic glue, seems to have worked well.
 

Micromeister

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A couple of notes on application of Liquid solvent "cements" Testor's or howevers!
apply a "first pass" to both parts quickly with an old bristle or "real hair" brush, not the tiny "applicator brush in the bottle" it don't hold enough material to complete the open application before the solvents "dry". Hold the pre-wetted parts together and apply another run of cement, allowing the liquid to Wick into the seam. I usually tilt the parts being joined to allow the solvent to run down along the seam. Hold firmly in place for about a minute, then rubber band or tape until the plastic (styrene or acrylic's) have had a chance to reharden.
This process is called "Solvent Welding" in the industry, We usually use a material called Methylene Chloride or (MC). MC is available in Qts. and Gallons from any Sign Supply House, or Plastic Fabricator/supplier. MC is a good bit stronger more aggressive solvent than the Testor's material, but either will work the same way. OBTW keep MC away from the kids it is a carcinogen!
hope this helps a little
 

r_swider

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Originally posted by DNoal
I have been extremely pleased with the "Tidal Wave" RTF Estes rocket I purchased. It has 8 or so flights and no visible marks or dings. (even after coming down in the woods and being stuck in a tree.)

While it is more expensive than $2 (it can be had at ToysRUs in our area for $14.99, comes with 2 motors, ignitors, wadding, shute, controller and pad) it seems like it is gonna last a while. Plus it flys really well.

Also, it requires NO construction, beyond attaching the chute.

I am sure I will enjoying launching it for a long time.
We have several other rockets similar to those you describe and they are much more durable than the all-plastic stuff. My son got the E2X rockets for his birthday as part of a kit (2 rockets, mini-pad, controller, 2 motors).

I will say this about them. They really rip off the pad quickly! Makes them fun to watch.
 

rbeckey

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At the risk of inciting to riot, I will humbly suggest what I have done on plastic two piece fin cans such as provided with the Chrome Dome rockets. There is a specialzed epoxy made specifically for plastic. I roughed up the inside of the fin can along the seam edge with 150 grit sandpaper, and actually scored it with a hobby knife. I used Testors tube type plastic cement to glue the halves together, taking care not to craze the chromed exterior. When it had set I mixed the plastic welding epoxy and spread it along the inside of the seams with a stick, where I had roughed up the materials, taking care not to leave so much as to interfere with the motor or locking ring, as the fin can IS the motor mount in the Chrome Domes. So far, so good, after several flights there is no sign of separation. I also used this type of epoxy to attach plastics to paper tubes, and the results have been very good.
Your mileage may vary.
 
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