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Estes Change Shock Cord Material?

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Woody's Workshop

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I'm just finishing up my Nemesis.
Put the decals on, found the chute package, but I couldn't find the shock cord in the blob of rubber shock cords.
I mark everything with a fine tip permanent marker so I know what goes to which kit.
When I opened the chute package, the chute was pre-assembled.
And the shock cord was in with it. Still too short as always, but...
Was was of sewing elastic 1/8" wide! First time I seen this in an Estes kit.
Nothing else in the process of building has such a shock cord, it's all rubber bandish type.

Any one else have a kit from around 2000-2002 that came with an elastic shock cord?
Or is this some kind of fluke?
 

Incongruent

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I got an Estes Wizard from my club, it seemed fairly old but probably not 2000-2002. It came with a short elastic shock cord as well.
 

mwtoelle

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Estes was using 1/8" and 1/4" elastic in their kits from 1993 to sometime in the early to mid 2000's. They probably went back to rubber after moving their kit packing operations to China.
 

Flyfalcons

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The BBII I built had an elastic cord. I swapped it for a longer rubber cord.
 

Mugs914

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I've used the elastic on some of mt Estes builds instead of the rubber. Not sure why, but it seems safer to me somehow. Probably entirely psychological; I have memories of what looked like good rubber parting company when I was a kid! At least I can see burns on the elastic!

My usual LPR (and smaller MPR) method now is to use kevlar cord attached to the motor mount and elastic between that and the NC. So far so good. Easy to check, easy to change if needed.

As usual, it comes down to good pre-flight inspections, I reckon.
 

shreadvector

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Estes switched to elastic for a number of reasons. "Experts" in online forums kept complaining about the cheap rubber-bad shock cords and other manuafacturers used elastic, plus they probably had other business decisions.

They switched back after years of complaints of the elastic not being as durable. if the tiniest flaming bit of ejection charge hit it, the fabric would melt and the shock cord would fail. Also, on the earlier injection molded E2X kits, the molded shock cord mount would cut them like a guillotine if there was any plastic flashing or semi-sharp edge.

After the "Dear Leader" left, they made the shock cords longer as well.
 

Gary Byrum

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Back when I did kits, I never ran into one that used elastic. But that was way back. I did get a clue on the "too short" rubber shocks that were supplied with the kits and bought a spool of rubber to cut my own lengths. After being twice baked...uh...er....born (BAR) I had to replace any and all rubber in any of the kits I had left because they dry rotted. Switched to elastic and the occasional Kevlar/elastic combo method and never looked back. For the life of me, I don't understand why some people have issues with elastic. Other than a few scorch marks, they've always held up. That is until I discovered those 18mm D motors from Aerotech. Those burn and eject way hotter and toasted a couple. That's when I started using the Kevlar combo.
 

Zeus-cat

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In our club we always recommend tying Kevlar line around the motor mount and out the front of the rocket several feet. Then tie the elastic or rubber band to that. It helps keep the stuff that melts far away from the ejection charge.

I can't recall ever seeing elastic in a kit, but I have used it in rockets. My wife had some of the lingerie type she didn't want and I used it in several rockets. Looks odd having the lacy bits on the elastic, but it works fine.
 

Micromeister

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I haven't used a stock "Always to short" Rubber or Elastic Estes or Quest Shock Cords for decades. I've Switched to either 90lb Kevlar to 1/8" Oval elastic or Stainless Cable, 90lb Kevlar to 1/8" Oval elastic.

Since changing to these Shockcord options I haven't lost a shockcord in decades. I even use Stainless Beading wire to 70lb kevlar shock lines on my Micro models.
 

Zeus-cat

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Lacy Bit...Good name for a rocket
I got a guy to name one of his rockets "John Smith's lacy panties", but the LCO wouldn't announce the name. Obviously, John Smith is not the real name; we used the name of one of our club members.
 
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