"estes Altitude Computer"

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scottluther1369

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What exactly is this? Is this new or old? I did a search on the net but couldn't find a copy. I belong to the estes educator section but I see no mention of it. Anyone have a copy they want to part with?
Thanks!
--Scott
 

ResearchWorm

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Originally posted by scottluther1369
What exactly is this? Is this new or old? I did a search on the net but couldn't find a copy. I belong to the estes educator section but I see no mention of it. Anyone have a copy they want to part with?
Thanks!
--Scott
If I remember correctly, this was/is Estes amazingly expensive hand-held and incredibly inaccurate blue plastic tracking theolodite (I think I spelled that right), and was pretty much useless at altitudes over 400 ft. It was essentially a upside down protractor, a weighted pendellum and a trigger. You'd crosshair the rocket up till apogee, and either release or hold the trigger at that point, read the inclination off the protractor face, and multiply that number times distance to the pad. I think the actual calculation is: Tangent of the angle multiplied by the distance to pad = altitude. If I need to use trig, I have to look up the equations. Only problem was that the numbers were so widely spaced that you'd end up trying to split hairs to figure out what it actually read. It'd probably be easier to make a suitable replacement then to find one. I've seen them at a local hobby shop though (Eagles Games, Models and Miniatures in Bellingham, WA) last time I was home, so I think they are still in production.

A couple of reasonable quality drafting protractors, a plumb bob, a length of wood, two small eyebolts, and a calculator. Cheaper, more accurate, and more educational as well.

Harm none,

ResearchWorm
 

hokkyokusei

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Or do you mean the Max Track? I believe this is intended to be carried on board _like_ an altimeter. Instead of an accelerometer of barometric sensor however, it has a timer that measures the time to fall to the ground on a streamer.
 

scottluther1369

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Stymye

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it's a cardboard slide rule type computer, should give a good general prediction,some of the motor data may be outdated tho ,,would make a nice collector piece .I have not seen one before
 

hokkyokusei

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That's not at all what I was thinking of! Looks cool though.
 

Larry

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I have one of those. The icture on ebay is of the envelope it is stored in.
You have to figure, or guess at the cd(drag coefficient) of your rocket. Engine size range from 1/2-A-6 to D12.
I've never used mine, but here are a couple of photos. Front first
 

Larry

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It also has what is called a precision procedure where you use temperature and elevation as factors. I think it is ment to be used with some of the estes technical reports. Estes had some really neat stuff at one time.
One other thing, this covers the engines listed, and single engine, single staged rockets.
Larry
 

rabidsheeep

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he might be talking about a new estes rocket i saw that has a digital display altimiter in the nosecone
 

scottluther1369

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I should have bought the one on eBay for 4 bucks but at 4 bucks it seemed like a waste of money. It would be fun to have with the kids though to use!
--Scott
 

Micromeister

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Originally posted by ResearchWorm
If I remember correctly, this was/is Estes amazingly expensive hand-held and incredibly inaccurate blue plastic tracking theolodite (I think I spelled that right), and was pretty much useless at altitudes over 400 ft. It was essentially a upside down protractor, a weighted pendellum and a trigger. You'd crosshair the rocket up till apogee, and either release or hold the trigger at that point, read the inclination off the protractor face, and multiply that number times distance to the pad. I think the actual calculation is: Tangent of the angle multiplied by the distance to pad = altitude. If I need to use trig, I have to look up the equations. Only problem was that the numbers were so widely spaced that you'd end up trying to split hairs to figure out what it actually read. It'd probably be easier to make a suitable replacement then to find one. I've seen them at a local hobby shop though (Eagles Games, Models and Miniatures in Bellingham, WA) last time I was home, so I think they are still in production.

A couple of reasonable quality drafting protractors, a plumb bob, a length of wood, two small eyebolts, and a calculator. Cheaper, more accurate, and more educational as well.

Harm none,

RW: I'll have correct you on this one. the alti-Tracks are crude but work quite well a part of a triple tracking station system.. Scout troops up and down the east coast have successfully used this system many times to track and close A- D powered models With closure rates below the magic 10% rate allowed in NAR competition. It's more a product of HOW the trackers are used and on what baseline. Set on a 1000 foot baseline we've had no trouble closing tracks on D powered models in the 2000 foot range. varified by higher tech Theodolites set at the same stations. True a single used for 400feet is pretty useless but set up properly they are an enexpensive way to track model rockets.

ResearchWorm
 

ResearchWorm

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Micro:

Ah ha! That explains why we had such miserable altitude readings at the football-field launches I attended when I was a YR. Only one of the kids could actually 'afford' to get one of these gadgets. Of course, he was the only one his dad would allow to use the thing. Now, if I'd had a clue back when I was younger, I should have spent my money on a getting one instead of all those Standards that I lost. At least I'd have a better idea of how high they went. Probably shouldn't have been flying them with the "big" C's. Two-staging a couple of 'em with drop-away D-x-0 boosters was probably a really bad idea. Launched pretty though.

Harm none,

ResearchWorm
 

r1dermon

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max-trax is a timer nose cone which comes in an RTF rocket. its got a button on the bottom side of the nose cone which when released, times its decent. (this is why its got a seperate streamer recovery from the BT. once it hits the ground it displays burnout alt. and apogee alt. at least, thats what mine did.
 

TheRadiator

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Originally posted by r1dermon
max-trax is a timer nose cone which comes in an RTF rocket. its got a button on the bottom side of the nose cone which when released, times its decent. (this is why its got a seperate streamer recovery from the BT. once it hits the ground it displays burnout alt. and apogee alt. at least, thats what mine did.
Mine worked once. Second time the NC landed in the concrete parking lot and hasn't worked right since.
 
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