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Eggfinder GPS missing satellites

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Voyager1

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That's helpful. Those of us new to this soldering business need this type of advice. Is there a preferred cleaning paster that should be used?

Yeah, but the instructions say that extra flux shouldn't be needed and might result in an adverse result. For those of us that aren't soldering experts we don't know when to break away from the instructions and do something different. Curious, why is there residual grease on the PCB if it has been cleaned per the first paragraph?

This I already do...
The cleaning paste I use for PCBs is called "Jiff" here. It's a gentle abrasive paste used in kitchens & bathrooms. Only apply and rub lightly with a moist paper towel. Don't scrub it! Wash, rinse and dry well after.

If you are new to soldering, then follow Cris' instructions - period! However, as I've been involved in electronics and soldering for 45 years, I can make up my own rules! There is always the possibility that you might touch the PCB pads after the cleaning, so there might be some residual grease from that. Also, if you didn't wash the board sufficiently and left some contaminants on the pads, the boiling flux helps to remove this.
 

OverTheTop

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For lightly oxidised PCB pads a scrub with a piece of paper towel works. For heavier oxidisation I would use something like a fine scotchbrite pad to gently remove the film. I don't like the idea of steel wool after a board is assembled as a fine piece can get where it will cause problems. I am also personally not very at ease with using a cleaning paste.

An alternative would be to use a microscrub contact cleaner. These are normally used for polishing up relay and switch contacts after any lumpy bits have been removed with a diamond file. They are slightly abrasive and not likely to harm other parts around. I have these in my toolbox at all times as they have 1001 uses!
They are just a flexible substrate with some very slightly abrasive surface. Here is an example.
 

DeepOvertone

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The pink eraser on the back of a pencil is actually really good for cleaning mildly oxidized pads. It contains a mild abrasive and sloughs off as you go so the contamination rolls away. Be sure to still clean up with alcohol afterwards.
 

OverTheTop

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The pink eraser on the back of a pencil is actually really good for cleaning mildly oxidized pads.
Now there's a blast from the past. I had forgotten about that one. Used to do it all the time on my Trash 80 (Tandy TRS-80) computer back in the late 70's. Works well.
 

steveh.jae

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The pink eraser on the back of a pencil is actually really good for cleaning mildly oxidized pads. It contains a mild abrasive and sloughs off as you go so the contamination rolls away. Be sure to still clean up with alcohol afterwards.
It’s what we used as PME techs years ago
 

cerving

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So I just threw a TX transmitter together, pre-tinning the ground pads on the GPS module. It seems to work fine, pre-tinning the pads doesn't seem to make it any easier to get the solder in the slots (we recommend that you turn up the temperature 20F or use a slightly larger tip), however I think it's probably going to make it easier to get a good bond on the GPS' ground pads. I'll revise the assembly instructions on the GPS transmitters.
 
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