Quantcast

Ebay with Metal Bulk Plates - Wildman

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

Zeke Johnson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
70
Reaction score
28
I received an electronics bay from Wildman Rocketry. It is a very basic kit, 1 32mm fiberglass coupler and two bulk plates (See Pictures).

I have never worked with metal bulk plates before. I was wondering if I could get some ideas on how to pass the electrical signal from my altimeter inside the ebay to the BP charge outside the ebay.

If it were non-conductive material, such as fiberglass or wood, I would just put 2 screws through the plate. Wire the altimeter to the screws inside, then wire the Black Powder capsule leads to the other end of the screws outside the ebay.

Since the plates are conductive metal, this method will not work.

I could just pass a pair of 22 awg insulated wire through a small hole in the metal plate, but then I risk a short due to vibration.

I asked Tim, but he din't offer any suggestions. He just offered to swap them for fiberglass plates.

Keep in mind this is pretty small. This is a coupler that goes inside a 32mm airframe.

Here are the photos:





Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Zeke
 

NateB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2012
Messages
1,609
Reaction score
1,446
Location
NE Indiana
I used the screw insulators from Binder Design through the aluminum bulkhead plate on my Punisher. The 3/16 one was the right size for my kit and I used it with the charge wells with integrated terminal blocks. You could use something similar to protect whatever screws you would use in a wood or fiberglass bulkhead like you described.

http://binderdesign.com/store/page28.html

You could also use a Well Nut or even just a hole with the e-match lead attached directly to your altimeter and secured with some putty. Given you have a small e-bay, I'd probably just drill a small hole and keep vibration and gasses out of the ebay with the putty.
 

David Schwantz

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
2,140
Reaction score
971
Location
MN
Easy way would be to just countersink your holes.
 

markg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2014
Messages
383
Reaction score
140
Location
Windsor, Ontario
I use terminal blocks. I drill the holes to match the legs on the blocks, then solder on the wires and wrap them in heat shrink tubing. I put a JST connector on the other end of the wire for the connection to the altimeter. I use a little bit of epoxy on the terminal block to keep it in place. I cover them in masking tape to protect them from BP residue after everything is connected. You can get these cheap from aliexpress.

cheers

F1444330-01.jpg
 

Brent

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
1,629
Reaction score
65
Dam how did they cut the OD on those bulk plates a chisel? That is some terrible chatter.
 

Rob702Martinez

Zip-Tie Oversight Committee
TRF Supporter
Joined
Dec 30, 2015
Messages
1,354
Reaction score
333
Location
Las Vegas
Dog house rocketry has a set up for this. You could also make your own with nylon standoffs, washers etc. Drill to fit a standoff put washers to insulate, put the metal screw through that.
 

Wallace

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2017
Messages
2,514
Reaction score
460
Easiest/most cost effective solution would be to simply take Tim up on his glass plates offer. Seems to me like everything else has to many potential issues/difficulties/costs/problems. In my mind, a couple of rock solid screws (as you've stated) as terminals and done is by far the best solution. There is a reason G-10 or phenolic, not aluminum is used for circuit boards and or potentially conductive areas.
 
Last edited:

Zeke Johnson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
70
Reaction score
28
Easiest/most cost effective solution would be to simply take Tim up on his glass plates offer. Seems to me like everything else has to many potential issues/difficulties/costs/problems. In my mind, a couple of rock solid screws (as you've stated) as terminals and done is by far the best solution. There is a reason G-10 or phenolic, not aluminum is used for circuit boards and or potentially conductive areas.
I think I like this suggestion the best. If there were more room to work with, I could experiment with different ways to insulate wires from the conductive plates.

This is a pretty small area. The pass through holes would need to be over sized to allow for the additional insulation material.

I think I will swap these out the the fiber glass plates and use my proven method of simple screw terminals.

WM_Bulk.Plates,Size.jpg
 

jd2cylman

Still not Carl... ;-)
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
4,867
Reaction score
737
Drill your holes, pass the wires through and use hot glue to seal the hole and protect against shorts. If that is too ghetto for you, then try these: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Hillman-15-Count-6-32-x-1-2-in-Rubber-Standard-SAE-Well-Nuts/4189131
I do the same, but use sticky tack/poster tack to plug the holes.
That's what I do also, except I use a single layer of 1" masking tape. Has held up to multiple 7 gram charges so far. Never any soot in the AV bay interiors. Switch if you want, but the wires aren't going to be moving in the hole, especially long enough to wear through the insulation. Drill the holes, chamfer each side, and pass the wires through. Tape or sticky tack or hot glue over the holes. Boom. Done. No terminal blocks to get crudded up.
 

ep29030

Mark N.
TRF Supporter
Joined
Dec 20, 2011
Messages
126
Reaction score
21
Location
Lebanon,IN
I would solder wires to terminal blocks, then put 1-2 layers of shrink tubing on wires to insulate through the bulkhead. Should work fine.
 

jd2cylman

Still not Carl... ;-)
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
4,867
Reaction score
737
Adrian, 7 gram charges, OMG!
Well, it was a 8" tube x 36" long, so there was some volume there... Actually, main was 6.5 and back up was 7.5 now that I think about it. :eek::eek:
But the single layer of tape held against the pressure fine...
 
Top