Quantcast

Duplicolor?

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

accooper

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
918
Reaction score
1
OK I live in South Texas, San Antonio to be exact. But where in the world can I find Duplicolor? Walmart doesn't have it, Home Depot doesn't, Nor Lowe's.

Is it better than Krylon?

Or Walmart Paint?

What makes it better?

Andrew In Texas :confused:
 
Last edited:

rocketguy101

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
1,429
Reaction score
46
I found mine at a NAPA auto parts store--read the labels, to look for the recoat anytime, as my store had the laquer based and the "other" kind.

There are several threads here about the paint reformulations and the problems it has caused modelers.
 

luke strawwalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
9,139
Reaction score
14
OK I live in South Texas, San Antonio to be exact. But where in the world can I find Duplicolor? Walmart doesn't have it, Home Depot doesn't, Nor Lowe's.

Is it better than Krylon?

Or Walmart Paint?

What makes it better?

Andrew In Texas :confused:

Duplicolor is an automotive paint... mainly lacquer, but they DO make SOME stuff in enamel, so watch your compatibility!!!!

You can generally get it at just about any auto-parts store... I know that O'Reilly's carries it, and I think that Auto Zone and Advance does as well.

Don't forget that TSC, Rural King, Big R, and other 'ag stores' often have a pretty good selection of rattle cans in pretty good colors... I'm partial to Allis Chalmer's Orange myself... :D

Good luck! OL JR :)
 

accooper

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
918
Reaction score
1
OK, Duplicolor seems to be a favorite around here. I have found some place to buy it but lets take it back a few steps.

If You are going to use Duplicolor Colors what primer brand should you use?

If You are going to use Duplicolor Colors what brand base coat should you use?

Should you sand between primer coats? Base coats?

I can build rockets, but painting has never been one of my strengths.

Andrew From Texas
 

mkadams001

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2009
Messages
876
Reaction score
1
I use the same brand of primer which is the Duplicolor filler primer. It is high build (for a spray can) dries fast and sands nice.

Sand the primer between coats and before the finish coat. The exception being if you use a primer sealer as a final prime coat.

I don't sand the color coats unless I had a problem. Typically, I spray my base coat (usually white) when it is dry; usually a couple of hours, I mask and spray the next color.

Painting really is not that complicated. It is that there are so many choices in products and the claims on the labels that makes it confusing.

Good Luck
 

blackjack2564

Crazy Jim's Gone Banana's
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,964
Reaction score
1,102
Location
Savannah Ga
I have used it over Rustoleum primer and Painters Touch primer also with great results and no compatibility problems.
 

MarkII

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,212
Reaction score
9
Dupli-Color makes wonderful primers. The two types that are most relevant for us are their line of Sandable primers and their Filler Primer - High-Build Formula. Their sandable primer (available in white, black, gray and red oxide) puts on a wonderfully even coat that dries quickly, which can, as the name indicates, then be lightly sanded to enhance the smoothness. The Filler Primer is an essential tool in any rocket builder's paint shop. The filler primer can be used to cover and fill in any scratches or other minor surface defects. (The can's label says that it can be used for defects up to 1/16" deep. I'm sure that is true, but I prefer to use a spot filler like Bondo Spot Putty or Aeropoxy Light Filler to repair anything that is even close to that deep.) Getting all of the defects out and achieving a completely smooth base surface is essential for getting a clean, smooth finish with the color coats or top coat. The filler primer can be repeatedly applied and sanded (it too sands very easily, but beware - it produces vast clouds of dust when it is sanded) until you have the entire surface perfectly even.



Dupli-Color primers are a bit more expensive than other spray primers, so I don't often use them as my sole primer (although you can certainly do that with them). My typical sequence is to fill the spirals in the paper tubes with Bondo Spot Putty or diluted Elmers Carpenters Wood Filler (formerly known as Fill 'N Finish), sand them smooth, and then prime them with a layer of Krylon White or Gray Primer. After that dries, I sand it smooth, which usually removes most of it from the surface. Then I spray on the Dupli-Color primer, sand that smooth if necessary (not always necessary) and then spray on my color coats.

Dupli-Color's color paints are also excellent, high quality spray paints. Again, they are often a bit more expensive than spray paints from Krylon, Rustoleum or Valspar, but the trade-off is that the Dupli-Color covers so well that you often don't need to use as much of it. Unless I am looking for some specific automotive colors, I don't usually go for their Scratch Fix 2in1 paints (in the tiny cans) or the Auto Sprays (small cans) because using them can get quite expensive. Instead, I go for the lacquers (blue labels) or other general purpose colors in the typical spray can sizes. But you can find some really striking colors in the Auto Spray paints, though. Check out EDSCC382 Radiant Fire if you want a really vibrant (but non-fluorescent) red. You can also achieve a really convincing anodized metal look on paper and wood with Dupli-Color's Metalcast line of paints, after first coating them with their Metalcast Ground Coat. Dupli-Color also has many other types of cool "effects" paints, too.



For a combination that will allow you to prime, paint and apply decals all in one day, prime with Dupli-Color Sandable Primer and, a couple of hours after applying your final coat of primer, topcoat with Dupli-Color Acrylic Lacquer spray paint. Both claim to be dry enough to handle within an hour, but I suggest giving them 2 hours each. color topcoats especially can take significant amounts of time to really dry hard (a couple of days or more), but the acrylic lacquer will be totally dry within a couple hours of application. The only problem with the lacquer spray paint is that it is only available in Flat, Semi-Gloss and Gloss Black, Gloss White, Metallic Silver and Clear. But lacquer can be topcoated by just about any other type of paint, so these colors make excellent, quick-drying base colors for subsequent masking. (But remember that lacquer cannot be used to paint over any other type of paint except lacquer. Other types of paint can cover lacquer, but lacquer cannot cover any other type of paint.)

I buy all of my Dupli-Color spray paints at my local Advance Auto store.

DISCLAIMER: I don't work for Dupli-Color (or any other entity at the moment... :rolleyes: ); I'm just a plain old customer.

MarkII

Attachment: My FlisKits Just Past Due with blue anodized tube fins and my anodized FlisKits Diminutive Deuce.

Anodized_JPD_and_Dim_Deuce.jpg
 
Last edited:

RimfireJim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
988
Reaction score
0
I'm partial to Allis Chalmer's Orange myself... :D
You woulda been in 7th heaven last month at my LHS - on the clearance table there were numerous cans of Krylon Allis-Chalmers orange for $2/can. Was surprised to see them, because it's a color I don't think they normally stocked. Old version of Krylon, too, so I couldn't resist buying one can just on principle :D
My dad has an A-C model B, so I'm partial to the color, too.
 

MarkII

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
8,212
Reaction score
9
You woulda been in 7th heaven last month at my LHS - on the clearance table there were numerous cans of Krylon Allis-Chalmers orange for $2/can. Was surprised to see them, because it's a color I don't think they normally stocked. Old version of Krylon, too, so I couldn't resist buying one can just on principle :D
My dad has an A-C model B, so I'm partial to the color, too.
I have a can of Rustoleum Allis-Chalmers Orange (a k a Persian Orange). I used it on my Micro Jayhawk. It looks like it is the perfect color for Jayhawks.

MarkII

DSCF0606.jpg


DSCF0604.jpg
 

luke strawwalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
9,139
Reaction score
14
OK, Duplicolor seems to be a favorite around here. I have found some place to buy it but lets take it back a few steps.

If You are going to use Duplicolor Colors what primer brand should you use?

If You are going to use Duplicolor Colors what brand base coat should you use?

Should you sand between primer coats? Base coats?

I can build rockets, but painting has never been one of my strengths.

Andrew From Texas
Well, if it were me, I'd probably stick to All Duplicolor stuff. DO MAKE SURE that everything you're getting is either ALL LACQUER or ALL ENAMEL, as I HAVE seen BOTH lacquers and enamel stuff in the Duplicolor brand! Nothing will screw up a paint job faster than trying to put a lacquer coat over an enamel coat!

Now, Duplicolor is higher. Since most of the stuff I've been building in the last year has been semiscalers using standard black/white color schemes and wraps, I haven't had any use for the Duplicolor stuff. What I've been using is mostly Walmart Colorplace 98 cent a can stuff. Works well and the price is right! I don't think I'd try using the Walmart primer under Duplicolor though until I did a paint test and was SURE that it was compatible. If I was really trying to get a killer gloss finish in 'wild colors' not readily available in the cheap paints, I'd go Duplicolor though.

Generally speaking, sticking to a single brand for all your primers/basecoats/topcoats/clearcoats should have the best compatibility and least problems. Just make sure the paint formulations are the same.

OF course you want to sand the primer down. The secret to a killer paint job is the following three simple rules: 1)surface prep 2) surface prep, 3) surface prep! The smoother you get the rocket, the primer, and the paint, the better the finished product will look. Remember too, you can't get a smooth glassy paint job on a rough, gritty, crappy looking surface! The overlying paint will look no better than your bare surface before you start painting! So, if you want the tube spirals filled, fillets glass smooth, fin/nosecone grain filled, etc. get that as good as you can get it beforehand. For filling tube spirals I've had the best luck with the Bondo red spot putty from the auto supply-- it's by the cans of bondo-glass body filler, and comes in a tube for filling minor imperfections in body filler before painting on car bodywork repairs. It's basically EXTREMELY thick primer; primer solids in a little solvent like toothpaste. You smear a little on with your finger, let dry, and sand. On fins and balsa nosecones, I use regular Elmer's wood filler thinned with a bit of water to the consistency of mustard, or maybe a tiny bit thinner, brushed on with a 1 inch paintbrush, allowed to dry, and sanded almost completely off. Usually one coat will do, sometimes with a few additional retouches if necessary. I've got a whole box of sandpaper, but I find that 98% of the time, I only need 220 grit regular and 600 grit wet/dry paper. The 220 grit may take slightly longer to sand fin leading edges and trailing edges and stuff like that, or to take filler down, but it doesn't leave deep sanding scratches that you have to sand down again to get rid of. So I use 220 grit almost exclusively for the first sanding. Once I've got the whole rocket smooth, I shoot it with a few coats of primer. I usually put 2-3 light coats on it, let it dry, and then sand it down with 220. If I can see ANY pits or imperfections, I can then either use the body spot putty on them if they're too deep for primer to fill, or do another coat of primer or primer touch-ups to the 'bad spots'. Then a little 220 finish sanding to get her nice and smooth. If there are still any spots where I had to keep sanding until the primer was all sanded off, but by now the rocket should be REALLY smooth, I'll usually go put another light primer coat on it, but usually this step is NOT necessary. I can usually get it done with just the main primer coat and maybe some touchups, all sanded down with 220 grit. If I DO recoat the whole thing, then again I just make a light sanding of the whole thing with 220 grit again to 'open the primer up' and take off some of the excess weight of the primer, and then switch to 600 grit wet/dry paper and use a bowl of water to wet the paper and clean the gunk off it. I 'damp sand' the rocket by wetting the paper, daubing most of the moisture off the paper on a towel (but leave a LITTLE moisture on the paper to form 'sanding mud' as you sand the primer down) and sand the rocket with the 600 grit, every so often washing the paper in the bowl and daubing it off, and using a damp paper towel to wipe the 'sanding mud' off the rocket, and drying it with a dry paper towel. This is easy to do while sitting and watching tv, and it usually doesn't take over about 30 minutes to do an average size rocket. Use your fingertips gliding over the surface of the rocket feeling for imperfections... (closing your eyes forces your brain to switch to 'feel mode' and makes this much more effective-- thats what we do on autobody work to feel imperfections) and then resand any imperfections lightly with the 600 grit until you get it nice and smooth. Once I think I've got it, and can't feel any imperfections anymore, I start holding the rocket up and turning it with a light in the background-- a window, overhead light, lamp, whatever. Try to observe the 'gleam' of the light off the tube, fins, etc., as you turn the rocket very slowly in your hand. Any waves or 'breakups' of the gleam (reflected light) off the tube or fins is a spot that needs a TOUCH more 600 grit sanding. At this point, it doesn't take much to go from good to darn near PERFECT, so it's time well spent. Usually I find that by the time I've damp sanded the whole rocket and given it the 'touch treatment' and sanded any spots again, the 'light treatment' reveals at most one or two spots that need ANY attention whatsoever. So basically, this whole process takes MAYBE an hour to do on the typical rocket, not like a week or anything, even though it SOUNDS terribly long and involved!

Once the primer is slick and glass smooth (it should be by this point-- the rocket will almost look like it's made of gray or red plastic depending on your primer color!) let it dry thoroughly (usually overnight, depending on conditions) and then you're ready for color coats. Usually I just shoot the thing with white and I'm done, but if I'm putting a 'wild color' paint job on the rocket, I usually start with a white base coat and then after that dries appropriately (depending on the paint instructions on the can for the particular paint I'm using-- if in doubt, always follow the instructions!) then I can mask (if necessary) using blue painter's tape and do the top color coats. Sometimes I use clearcoat, and sometimes I use Future floor polish. Usually I use clearcoat on wraps, and future polish on paint, after it's dried a good long while, so the paint has had time to 'cure' and let ALL the solvents out... (which can take a week or two).

Good luck to you and post pics! (you can upload them straight from your hard drive to your posts-- go to 'manage attachments' below the post text window and then 'browse' find your pic on your hard drive (usually 'my pictures' or whatever) and then double-click them to put the filename in the box and click 'upload file'. TRF's upload tool will automatically resize the pics so they'll fit on the website at a good resolution.)

Later and good luck! OL JR :)
 

luke strawwalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
9,139
Reaction score
14
Here's a few pics of some of my stuff done with the methods above...

I think they look okay... (grins)

Take it easy and good luck! OL JR :)

discoverer thor 5.jpg


discoverer thor 11.jpg
 

accooper

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
918
Reaction score
1
OK, if you live in the San Antonio Texas area, 3 Walmart's have a limited supply of Duplicolor paint that is marked down for $3 a can. Not a large selection but some. The 3 Walmarts are

The One By The Airport on Jones-Maltsberger
The One on Se Loop 410 and Rigsby
The One on NW Loop 410 and Military

Better run over there and check it out!

Hope this is a help to someone.

Andrew
 

Huge Blues

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
83
Reaction score
0
I get mine at my local Pep Boys.

Have had good results with the High Build Formula.

It is pricey at $5+ per can. My Pep Boys is only 3 blocks away
so I gladly pay for the convenience.
 

Latest posts

Top