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Blast it Tom!

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But on a wood lathe you can make the entire transition yourself. Chuck the raw material in the lathe chuck, bore the center hole first and use it for your live center to keep everything concentric, then turn the o.d.

View attachment 439052
So you're saying to just chuck it all? ;)
duck.gif


I'm looking forward to retirement when I can do such things on my lathe... clearly this is the more superior method. Learing how to bore on the lathe and getting the fixturing for it will be interesting.
 

jqavins

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I've found you spend hours building the fixturing, to bore a 2 minute hole.
That's what I meant about a fixture. Take a piece of scrap wood, like a 2x4, and bore a hole so the shoulder of the transition goes into that hole with a very snug fit into that hole.
So it takes you hours to put a hole in a 2×4?

A wood lathe, with a chuck that engages either on the o.d. or the bore of the part produces much better results, with no fixturing, or minimal fixturing.
I'm starting to feel like I'm arguing with you, which is not what I want to do. So I'll make this last point then stop.

Forming the whole thing on a lathe like that, along with all the myriad other things you can do on a lathe, also takes a lot more acquired skill. To be sure, there's a learning period to making nice holes with a drill press, but a lot less of one than there is with a lathe.

Also for the last time I'll emphasize where we agree, that much depends on what one a) wants to do today and b) realistically sees ones desires growing to (since we all know they will grow to some extent).
 

lakeroadster

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So you're saying to just chuck it all? ;) View attachment 439054

I'm looking forward to retirement when I can do such things on my lathe... clearly this is the more superior method. Learing how to bore on the lathe and getting the fixturing for it will be interesting.
But... full disclosure... split happens! The best method is to glue up the stock from several pieces, and then turn them later.
007.JPG

So it takes you hours to put a hole in a 2×4?

I'm starting to feel like I'm arguing with you, which is not what I want to do. So I'll make this last point then stop.

Forming the whole thing on a lathe like that, along with all the myriad other things you can do on a lathe, also takes a lot more acquired skill. To be sure, there's a learning period to making nice holes with a drill press, but a lot less of one than there is with a lathe.

Also for the last time I'll emphasize where we agree, that much depends on what one a) wants to do today and b) realistically sees ones desires growing to (since we all know they will grow to some extent).
Lighten up Francis! :facepalm:.. Just kidding.

The right way to prevent splitting of a transition would be to make some sort of fixture that holds the entire transition.. the shoulders at both ends. That would take some time to build... maybe just two pieces of 2x4, each with a hole to capture each shoulder, then space the 2 x 4"s with some scrap? It all depends.

There's no arguing.. merely expressing of opinions and actual real world attempts that sometime are easier than one would think, and sometimes kindling.

It's all good. Sometimes we sacrifice parts to the God's of Vertical Thrust, other times we amaze ourselves.
 
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jqavins

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Alright, I said I was done debating lathe or press, and I am. This is a lathe question.

For glued up stock, does one glue up triangles, with grain direction rotated to keep it near tangent to the cutting surface?
1605892125079.png

Of course, one needn't stop at four segments, but that was the quick easy to sketch it. More segments would keep the grain closer to tangent, and also the uncut shape would be closer to circular. Y'see, I understand the geometry, but don't have any experience.

EDIT: OK, I couldn't help myself. Here's the eight segment version:
1605893139924.png
 
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lakeroadster

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Alright, I said I was done debating lathe or press, and I am. This is a lathe question.

For glued up stock, does one glue up triangles, with grain direction rotated to keep it near tangent to the cutting surface?
View attachment 439056
Of course, one needn't stop at four segments, but that was the quick easy to sketch it. More segments would keep the grain closer to tangent, and also the uncut shape would be closer to circular. Y'see, I understand the geometry, but don't have any experience.
I typically just glue 4 square pieces together... or more pieces, depends on the size. What you are proposing would work, but getting the angles all correct to get a good tight glue joint would be much more problematic.

As an example.. I did an "inside out" turning of a Christmas tree topper and used (4) pieces of pine.

Would make for an interesting rocket... :christmastree:

003.JPG004.JPG001.JPG004.JPG006.JPG007.JPG0001.JPG
 
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rekrapmij

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My Harbor Freight small drill press still runs great after years of use.
 

Bowman

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Machinist taught me this one: if your keyed chuck tends to slip, tighten the chuck in one of the key holes, then move to the other holes in turn and tighten in each. Apparently tightening just in one location can leave the chuck just loose enough to slip.

Best -- Terry

Funny, that was a lesson we learned back in 1973 Metals Shop. Shop teacher said three is best two is minimum for even clamping of the chuck.

Of course they don't offer those "dangerous" classes in HS anymore.

Pity
 

Bowman

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Digital read outs are nice, but personally I see them as just something more to go wrong. But that's just me.
I hope you make a wise and informed decision and purchase the machine you will be happy and safe with for years to come.
I bought a "Tool Shop" drill press from Menards I believe, maybe HF.
Variable speed via a knob on top that expands or shrinks the pulley.
Digital readout and a pretty nice 5/8" chuck.

The casting looks very much like the Wen. I bet they are the same.
My power switch is on the side and the digital readout is on front.
I have had it for 15+ years and all functions are nominal.
I verified the accuracy of the readout with an optical tach and it is right on.
If the readout ever did fail I'd probably just resort to the hand-held tach if I couldn't get the part.
 

TheTank

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Not sure I would recommend Harbor Freight drill bits if you are doing any precision drilling. I have picked up several packs/kits for "multipurpose" use (not precision) and they get the job done... but run out on some of the bits is pretty bad right out of the box... some seem more crooked than a politician.
 

Bowman

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Not sure I would recommend Harbor Freight drill bits if you are doing any precision drilling. I have picked up several packs/kits for "multipurpose" use (not precision) and they get the job done... but run out on some of the bits is pretty bad right out of the box... some seem more crooked than a politician.
Do you mean a standard politician or an Illinois politician?
I have a set of old Blue Point bits, full fractional and numbers that I use if I need to be particular. But I haven't found that much wrong with my HF bits. Mind you I have had them for at least 12 years so maybe they've changed.
 

rharshberger

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I recently got the 10” variable speed version with laser sight. I love it. It has made things so much easier. I think the quality is decent and the accuracy is good,have not seen any wandering and runout seems good(haven’t measured it however). I think it was a good investment. View attachment 438924
That WEN looks a newer version (switch section only) of my 15-20 year old Delta bench top model.
 

OverTheTop

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I like a floor-standing drillpress as it leaves more bench space for other things. They are generally not much more expensive than a benchtop and worth the money IMHO, if you have the space in your workshop.

As others have mentioned unless you spend a reasonable amount stay away from keyless chucks.

I would also suggest you get one of these clamps and hang it on a hook on the drillpress. Makes for much safer drilling.
Main.jpg

 

TheTank

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Do you mean a standard politician or an Illinois politician?
I have a set of old Blue Point bits, full fractional and numbers that I use if I need to be particular. But I haven't found that much wrong with my HF bits. Mind you I have had them for at least 12 years so maybe they've changed.
CT politician. Spineless and wobbles back and forth! Most of the HF bits have been ok. Some are just off. Noticed it the other day when I chucked a couple bits around 1/4”. The tracked at least an 1/8” out from center. That said, for 11$ or whatever I paid for them with the expectation that they were one-use throw aways and not my full set of number drills... they poke holes and work for what I got them for.
 

OverTheTop

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But... full disclosure... split happens! The best method is to glue up the stock from several pieces, and then turn them later.
View attachment 439055
If you put a wood carving bit in your Dremel and use that on your wood lathe you will likely avoid the splitting problem greatly. That's what I use on my metal lathe for fine balsa machining and it works a treat.

32.JPG


33.JPG
 

Senior Space Cadet

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If you put a wood carving bit in your Dremel and use that on your wood lathe you will likely avoid the splitting problem greatly. That's what I use on my metal lathe for fine balsa machining and it works a treat.

View attachment 439724

View attachment 439723
What the hell?! You trying to make me feel incompetent. You must have really steady hands and a good eye.
Is that a boat tail you are making? Now I might have to buy a lathe after all.
 

Senior Space Cadet

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I have a history of looking for reviews of an item after I've already bought it.
I looked up reviews, of the drill press I ordered, and watched a couple video unpacking and reviews.
The good news is that the drill press I ordered seems to be generally regarded as the best you can buy at this price.
The bad news is you get what you pay for. Biggest complaints seemed to be with the overall finish and the chuck.
Both reviewers bought new chucks. I believe the issue was something called "runout".
So I ordered another chuck. A keyless. Only $46, but supposed to be pretty good. We'll see.
Drill press is supposed to come Friday (it's now Wed.).
 

itsmeGriff

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Do you mean a standard politician or an Illinois politician?
I have a set of old Blue Point bits, full fractional and numbers that I use if I need to be particular. But I haven't found that much wrong with my HF bits. Mind you I have had them for at least 12 years so maybe they've changed.
Since I also hail from Illinois....
Nice suit, nice hair and nice jail cell. Pretty much sums up many Illinois politicians! LOL...
Sad but true!
 

Jay Dub 4009

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I have a history of looking for reviews of an item after I've already bought it.
I looked up reviews, of the drill press I ordered, and watched a couple video unpacking and reviews.
The good news is that the drill press I ordered seems to be generally regarded as the best you can buy at this price.
The bad news is you get what you pay for. Biggest complaints seemed to be with the overall finish and the chuck.
Both reviewers bought new chucks. I believe the issue was something called "runout".
So I ordered another chuck. A keyless. Only $46, but supposed to be pretty good. We'll see.
Drill press is supposed to come Friday (it's now Wed.).
I have no issues with run out and the chuck on the WEN I just got. I would have bought a drill press vice instead.
 

Woody's Workshop

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The thing is, everything comes from China. Brand names mandate specs for tolerances and refinements.
Many castings are used for various brand names. From the casting facility they are graded and sent to one of a few factories where they are milled, drilled and fitted for bearings and such. The better castings go to those more expensive brands. And on down the line. Then come the electrics, and the Brand Names get the good stuff, and on down the line.
I hate to say this, but I think HF gets the bottom.
I've been in the market for a small air compressor to paint rockets with a small HVLP gun and run a couple air brushes.
Reading reviews on air compressors, I started to read other reviews on other things.
Not just from HF, but pretty much all the big box stores.
I don't read the 3,4&5 ratings, they don't give a lot of useful info.
But the 1 & 2 ratings do. And it doesn't seam to matter what brand, there seams to be a series of problems.
Either broken solid air lines or regulator failure, and motors that don't last.
But, HF has a lot more of these problems.
In today's "China Made" world, it's going to be hit and miss unless you spend top dollar.
When I bought my Power Matic Table saw in 2004, the top was ground flat, but rough.
I spent 8 hours power sanding it smooth. That's was the only problem I ever had with it.
So even spending the top dollar doesn't insure you perfection....from China.
Now I will Rant.
Stop exporting all our scrap metal and coal to China, and stop importing from China.
And put the American's back to work and be more self reliant as a Nation!!!
Rant Over.
 

lakeroadster

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The thing is, everything comes from China. Brand names mandate specs for tolerances and refinements.
Many castings are used for various brand names. From the casting facility they are graded and sent to one of a few factories where they are milled, drilled and fitted for bearings and such. The better castings go to those more expensive brands. And on down the line. Then come the electrics, and the Brand Names get the good stuff, and on down the line.
I hate to say this, but I think HF gets the bottom.
I've been in the market for a small air compressor to paint rockets with a small HVLP gun and run a couple air brushes.
Reading reviews on air compressors, I started to read other reviews on other things.
Not just from HF, but pretty much all the big box stores.
I don't read the 3,4&5 ratings, they don't give a lot of useful info.
But the 1 & 2 ratings do. And it doesn't seam to matter what brand, there seams to be a series of problems.
Either broken solid air lines or regulator failure, and motors that don't last.
But, HF has a lot more of these problems.
In today's "China Made" world, it's going to be hit and miss unless you spend top dollar.
When I bought my Power Matic Table saw in 2004, the top was ground flat, but rough.
I spent 8 hours power sanding it smooth. That's was the only problem I ever had with it.
So even spending the top dollar doesn't insure you perfection....from China.
Now I will Rant.
Stop exporting all our scrap metal and coal to China, and stop importing from China.
And put the American's back to work and be more self reliant as a Nation!!!
Rant Over.
Until that happens... buy used equipment... typically you'll get better quality and won't be giving your hard earned money to countries you have an issue with.
 

rharshberger

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The thing is, everything comes from China. Brand names mandate specs for tolerances and refinements.
Many castings are used for various brand names. From the casting facility they are graded and sent to one of a few factories where they are milled, drilled and fitted for bearings and such. The better castings go to those more expensive brands. And on down the line. Then come the electrics, and the Brand Names get the good stuff, and on down the line.
I hate to say this, but I think HF gets the bottom.
I've been in the market for a small air compressor to paint rockets with a small HVLP gun and run a couple air brushes.
Reading reviews on air compressors, I started to read other reviews on other things.
Not just from HF, but pretty much all the big box stores.
I don't read the 3,4&5 ratings, they don't give a lot of useful info.
But the 1 & 2 ratings do. And it doesn't seam to matter what brand, there seams to be a series of problems.
Either broken solid air lines or regulator failure, and motors that don't last.
But, HF has a lot more of these problems.
In today's "China Made" world, it's going to be hit and miss unless you spend top dollar.
When I bought my Power Matic Table saw in 2004, the top was ground flat, but rough.
I spent 8 hours power sanding it smooth. That's was the only problem I ever had with it.
So even spending the top dollar doesn't insure you perfection....from China.
Now I will Rant.
Stop exporting all our scrap metal and coal to China, and stop importing from China.
And put the American's back to work and be more self reliant as a Nation!!!
Rant Over.
One of HF's deals is that they sell them cheap enough that if they break fixing them is more expensive than just buying another. My SIL brought me a small pancake compressor with a bad pressure switch...and...its an HF....no parts available but maybe I can make another pressure switch work, but just replacing the darn thing a $59.99 is a better choice or better spendingvthe bucks to get a better one by Porter Cable/Dewalt/Makita/etc.
 

KC3KNM

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I have a history of looking for reviews of an item after I've already bought it.
I looked up reviews, of the drill press I ordered, and watched a couple video unpacking and reviews.
The good news is that the drill press I ordered seems to be generally regarded as the best you can buy at this price.
The bad news is you get what you pay for. Biggest complaints seemed to be with the overall finish and the chuck.
Both reviewers bought new chucks. I believe the issue was something called "runout".
So I ordered another chuck. A keyless. Only $46, but supposed to be pretty good. We'll see.
Drill press is supposed to come Friday (it's now Wed.).
Odds are if you’re drilling balsa and other soft stuff even .01” of runout likely wouldn’t be an issue. You might see some accelerated wear on the tool and a slightly larger hole as the bit isn’t running true. Drilling isn’t wildly precise to begin with.

If you’d like to verify runout at the chuck you can get a test indicator and gauge pin off Amazon for pretty cheap. Chuck the pin into the chuck and measure runout at the pin. While not necessary, it’s handy to have a cheap test indicator around to find hole centers and aid in setup. That said, I wouldn’t be overly concerned with runout for your purposes assuming the drill press arrives in good condition.
 
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