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Dr. Zooch R-7 Soyuz Build Thread

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hcmbanjo

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I haven’t done a build thread in a while. I’ve had a good time building three other Dr. Zooch kits. This is one I bought at the Rocketry Zone’s closing sale.
Opening the box, I sanded square the tube ends, nose cone and adapter bases. I used some thin CA to strengthen the inside of the body tube ends.
I went ahead and scanned the wrap sheets. These are really just outlined cuts, with no inside printing. I wanted to have the option to make new ones if necessary.
I changed out a new #11 blade and put new 400 grit on my sanding block.

STEP 1: PARTS LIST
The kit uses standard parts except for a pre-weighted balsa Spacecraft Adapter and “ribbon-like” Kevlar.
The long Spacecraft adapter is cut into “plugs” later on in Step 8b.
The Kevlar is two pieces twisted together. Each strand is almost like a flat ribbon, with filaments. It feels plenty strong, just different than the standard Kevlar supplied in other kits.

STEP 2: ALIGNMENT SLEEVE
Cut out the Alignment Sleeve, wrap and tape around the T-50 tube. You are told to set it aside until step 16.

1 Soyuz Parts.jpg


2 Soyuz Parts .jpg


3 Soyuz Alignment Guide.jpg
 

hcmbanjo

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STEP 3: MARKING SPIDER BEAMS
Place the T-20 Core Tube on the Alignment guide. Mark the tube for the 8 Vertical Radials. The circle on the Alignment guide is a slightly larger diameter than the T-20 tube. You can actually see the alignment line circle outside the edges of the T-20. This way you are assured it is centered.
Extend the marks down the tube. I used an aluminum angle.

STEP 4: INSTALLING THE ENGINE HOOK
Standard procedures here, cut a slot for the engine hook.
Zooch has you cut a Reinforcement Band from the pattern sheet. This goes under the top end of the engine hook for extra strength. Another good idea, 20 sized tubes have always seemed thin to me.
Place the Engine Hook and apply a wrap of masking tape just below the reinforcement band. I used black electrical tape for the wrap.
From the top it would be hard to apply a fillet to the CR205W Engine Block. I decided to apply the fillet from the lower end, applying white glue drop-by-drop with a dowel.

4 Soyuz Spider Beam Marking .jpg


5 Soyuz Spider Beam Marking.jpg


6 Soyuz Engine Block Fillet.jpg


7 Soyuz Engine Hook Wraps.jpg
 

luke strawwalker

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Looking good...

I'm glad to hear that the tube guide circle on this kit is actually larger than the tube in question-- the tube guide on the BT-60 Atlas-Agena I just finished was a tad undersize, and so it was pretty hard to get the tube centered on the circle since it was INSIDE the tube, and very important to get the tube centered to get it marked properly, as the side fairings of the Atlas are centered between these marks.

I'm looking forward to this one... I have one in the build pile... :)

Later! OL JR :)
 

hcmbanjo

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I had to back-track tonight. I realized the lower BT-20 might be exposed between the four engines. I already applied a black electrical tape wrap over the engine hook instead of the masking tape directed in the instructions. I didn’t know how electrical tape would accept spray paint. I decided to replace it with a cardstock wrap.
I'll have to to fill the body tube seams on the engine mount tube. I'll fill after I find out how far the narrow side of the shroud seats on the T-20.

STEP 5 THE ADAPTER
I’ve always hated shrouds. All the patterns in this kit have thick lines to cut on. Sometimes the smallest deviation from the line can make a shroud that fits poorly. I decided to try something new.
I cut out the shroud just on the outside edge of the lines. I found the correct overlap by dry-fitting it over the tubes and centering rings.
I cut a masking tape strip about 5/16" wide. Half was stuck lengthwise down one edge on the inside of the shroud. I wrapped the smaller end around the T-20 side and marked at the overlap.
The shroud was placed down the T-20 tube, then the centering rings were slid into position. No glue yet.
The shroud was slid up and over the edge of the lower centering ring. The T–50 was set over the rings and touching the edge of the shroud. By using the tape on the tab I was able to lift and re-set the shroud edge until I got a good match between the two tubes.
After I got the right sizing, white glue was sparingly applied under the tab. The tab was lightly pressed in place. The tape is left on the inside of the shroud.
Before the glue had a chance to dry, I took off the shroud and set a ½" dowel inside. This gave me a good, hard surface to press the paper tab down and keep it round.
Before anything new is glued, I’ll fill the tube seams.

8. Soyuz engine Mount Re-Wrap.jpg


9. Soyuz Shroud Wrap with Tape Seam.jpg


10. Soyuz Shroud Dry-Fitted.jpg


11. Soyuz Shroud Fitted.jpg
 
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Fred22

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This is a an excellant build thread. Keep it up please :)
Cheers
fred
 

hcmbanjo

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Sorry,
No update today. I've done some building on the Soyuz but my AT&T internet is down for the day. I'm writing this from a coffee shop. More pictures tomorrow.

It's amazing how hard it is to communicate over the phone to the phone company! I went through a dozen prompts to get technical support. The overseas connection was so poor and his accent so strong I gave up. I called back to complain (more prompts) only to find out service is out until tomorrow afternoon.
Sorry, I feel better now that I've vented.
 
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hcmbanjo

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As mentioned earlier, I decided to fill the seams on the T-20.
I’m trying a new way to get Elmer’s Carpenter’s Wood Filler into body tube seams. Before, I’ve used a brush and then a razor blade to take off the excess.
I'm sure I mix my Fill N’ Finish a little thinner than some. I now dip the tip of a older X-Acto blade into the filler. I pick up a small drop and set the blade into the seam. I drag the drop of filler down the seam. The seam “slot” helps direct the blade and filler into the seam. It’s a more direct application, uses less filler and there is less filler to sand.
Once the four Strap-ons are in place I won’t be able to reach the inside shroud to smooth it out. I sprayed the shroud area with grey primer and sanded smooth.

STEP 6: TUBE CUTTING
I’ll fill the seams of the larger T-50 tube before cutting it into smaller sections.

STEP 7: FORWARD SECTION OF THE BOOSTER STAGE
The fit of the rings over the T-20 tube was tight, I did have to peel away some of the inside layer.
I didn’t see it necessary to cut such a wide, 3/16" out of the second centering ring for the Kevlar to go through. You are told to cut the 3/16" notch “almost” through the ring. I took a small file and made a smaller circular notch.
I tied the Kevlar around the tube then fed the end through the notched ring. The ring is glued flush with the end of the T-20.
The lower ring is slid up to allow 1/8" between the two rings and glued. The illustrations are drawn to show the 1/8" space look wider for clarity.
A small line of glue was run around the place where the lower end of the shroud would sit. (No glue was laid on the lower centering ring - yet) I slid the shroud up and onto the lower centering ring. I aligned the shroud seam where it would be covered by an engine.
The upper shroud intersection is left without glue for now. When the upper section of the first stage section is glued, I'll “roll” the upper shroud into the glue and form it to fit the transition better. Usually I’ll burnish a seam like this with the back a smooth plastic pen casing, like the white end of a Sharpie pen. Be sure the pen surface is clean before using.

STEP 8: MAKING THE SPIDER BEAMS
This reminds me of the spider beams used in the Saturn 1B kit. They really helped lining up the eight engines on the 1B.
Cut eight no wider than 1/8". I would assume the 1/16" side is glued to the body tube and the wider 1/8" is vertical. The lengths are up to the builder. I’ll cut them to the length shown in the instruction illustrations, from the small side of he shroud to the top of the reinforcement band, about 2 11/16" long.

12. Soyuz Filling T-20 Seams.jpg


13. Soyuz Seams ready for sanding.jpg


14. Soyuz Secong Ring slot for Kevlar.jpg


15.Soyuz rings and Kevlar in place.jpg


16. Soyuz Spider Beams in place.jpg
 

hcmbanjo

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I jumped ahead and made the parachute. I use some different tools to build 'chutes with, I thought I would pass them on if anyone is interested.

From Step 19:
Unlike others, I (kind of) enjoy making parachutes.
I’m never happy with punching a sharp pencil or cutting a hole in the reinforcing disks. It seems ragged and I wonder if the strength of the ‘chute is compromised.
I’ve started using a Rotary Punch to cut a round hole in the reinforcement disk. They are also great for engine hook notches in centering rings. I picked up this punch at Lowe’s for $10.00. A standard paper punch won’t work.
To get a clean edge on the punch, fold over a piece of cardstock and put it under the area you want to punch. This gives a stronger backing to the punching area.
Squeeze the handle and when you hear the Rotary Punch “click”, you know you’ve cut through the parachute and the doubled cardstock underneath.
Another tool that helps in tying shroud lines is long tweezers. These are left over from my ship builds. You definitely need longer tweezers to tie the rigging on a model ship. Tying a square knot on a parachute is a lot easier using them. They are also good for “fishing” Kevlar through a body tube.

60. Dr. Zooch Soyuz Punching Chute Holes.jpg


61. Dr. Zooch Soyuz Tying Lines with Tweezers.jpg
 

hcmbanjo

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STEP 8b: PRIME CUTTING BALSA PLUGS
No problems here, I used my old fine toothed X-Acto saw for this, it’s probably 35 years old. The shortest plug turned out to be a little short of ½". Hopefully not enough to make a difference.

STEP 9: STRAP ON PRODUCTION
I knew these were going to be a challenge, especially the “Witches Hat” tip cones.
The instructions don’t mention it, but I would recommend steaming to help the cardstock curve smoothly. I steamed the shrouds over an open pan of slow boiling water.
I traced 8 more copies onto some 110 lb. Cardstock. I’ll make a bunch and pick out the four best.
Because the cones taper to a point, I made a sharpened dowel for some support when forming the tip. Initially I sharpened a 1/4" dowel in a pencil sharpener, but it needed a longer tapered end. The new dowel taper was sanded down using 220 grit on a block.
The instructions are right when they way “some kneading will be required.” Take it slow, if you go too fast you will get creases. It took making the first six cones just to get it right.
The very tip is the hardest. I ended up pushing the smallest (high) end of the glue tab under the other side of the shroud with the flat edge of a razor blade. It’s a delicate bend, so sharp and tapered it almost becomes a crease at the tip. Don’t crease it though, keep working it slowly until it forms into the sharp tip.
In the end I have four good Witches Hats out of the eleven I made.
I coated just the tips of the Hats with thin Super Glue. This gave strength and when dry it’s sand-able. I only coated the tip, the open end has to remain flexible to fit the lower the Strap-on shroud. I was able to clean up the end of the taper by sanding the CA coated tip with 400 grit sandpaper on a block.

17. Soyuz Witches Hat copies.jpg


18. Soyuz Hat form dowel.jpg


19. Soyuz Pre-roll Hat .jpg


20. Soyuz Hats finished.jpg


16b Soyuz Balsa Plugs .jpg
 
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hcmbanjo

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I made a few traced copies of the larger Strap On Cones. I steamed, wrapped and glued one to try one of the Witches Hats.

STEP 10: MORE STRAP-ON PRODUCTION
They actually fit very well, except on the top where the larger cone glue tab overlapped. Because there is one cone inside the other, there is a gap at the top the width of the cardstock.
Where the tab was, the gap was the thickness of two layers of cardstock. In this kit, this is the best way to fit the cones.
I cut the tabs back at the top and bottom. After forming the a shroud, it did help with the fit.

Because my Witches Hats were copies, I had to transfer and draw the zig-zag cuts on the bottom. I didn’t extend the top of the triangles to the edges of the circle line. I left them lower so the cones wouldn’t bunch up at the bottom of the exposed “hat”.
Three out of the four worked very well. Only one puckered a bit. It shouldn’t be a problem, I’ll fill and sand it when all is glued together.
The Witches Hat tops aren’t glued yet. I didn’t use the dowel to push the Hats into place. Instead, I simply dropped them down into the lower Strap-On shroud and let it fall into the upper hole.

Because I used Super Glue on the tip, I was able to hold onto it and pull it into position without bending or distorting the sharp end.
The seams were lined up on both pieces. I set against the Core Tube’s Shroud and pushed the Hat onto the shroud.
I removed the whole Strap-On without changing the position.
Rather than smearing white glue inside the of the assembly, I touched a small drop of CA on the outside (back) where the seams met.
This actually made a “hinge” on the inside, leaving the outside joint open for final adjustments.
I set the Strap-On assembly back on the Core Tube Adapter and pushed the Hat tip against the shroud. Then another drop of CA was set on the outside (visable) seam and insured the angle was correct.

I numbered each position for the Strap-Ons (1 - 4) on the Core Tube Assembly. Some Strap-Ons may fit a little differently than the others. As one was matched to the Core Tube Shroud, I numbered the tubes so I knew their original position.

21. Soyuz Strap On  Cone Cuts.jpg


22. Soyuz Strap On Cones Formed.jpg


23. Soyuz Witches Hats Steps.jpg


24.Soyuz Strap On complete.jpg
 

Dr.Zooch

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WOW! Super tips here in building- I may add some of these into the instructions.
 

foose4string

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Chris, I used much smaller zigzag cuts(and lots more of them) than what the pattern shows for the base of those witches hats. Adding more relief cuts allows the bottom of the hat to form a more rounded shape, takes away some of the puckering. It also allows a smoother a transition to the tank shrouds. I wouldn't mine experimenting with one of those tanks and putting lots of small zigzag cuts on top of the tank shrouds instead of the hat and see if that makes any difference in the appearance. I'm very grateful that I had built several paper models before I built this one and applied some of the tricks I learned from those.

In any event, your tanks still look great. Good build thread!
 

BobH48

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I wouldn't mine experimenting with one of those tanks and putting lots of small zigzag cuts on top of the tank shrouds instead of the hat and see if that makes any difference in the appearance.
What would work even better is to put the zigzag cuts on a separate piece glued to the inside of the tank shrouds. Then you can just make the witches hats with the base the exact same size as the tank top.

That is the way I made the tanks on my 1/48 scale paper soyuz.

Soyuz booster tip.jpg
 

Dr.Zooch

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That would work nicely... for you. Keep in mind that I sell these to folks who do not have anywhere near your skill level when it comes to building. So if the steps are not able to cross many skill levels and still come out, I have the highly skilled builders- like you, who are happy with the fine results- but the lower skilled builders will quickly find the kit not working out and get frustrated... and then blame me.

The fact is- the higher skill level builders will take their own methods and apply them to the kit and get results like the photo you have displayed. The lower skilled builders can still get good results and everyone has fun. In fact- a lot of builders will read a tip such as the one you've posted and will use your ideas to improve their own build- so never hesitate to post some of your terrific tips!
 

BobH48

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That would work nicely... for you. Keep in mind that I sell these to folks who do not have anywhere near your skill level when it comes to building. So if the steps are not able to cross many skill levels and still come out, I have the highly skilled builders- like you, who are happy with the fine results- but the lower skilled builders will quickly find the kit not working out and get frustrated... and then blame me.

The fact is- the higher skill level builders will take their own methods and apply them to the kit and get results like the photo you have displayed. The lower skilled builders can still get good results and everyone has fun. In fact- a lot of builders will read a tip such as the one you've posted and will use your ideas to improve their own build- so never hesitate to post some of your terrific tips!
I totally agree with your rational about targeting a broader range of skill levels.

I was responding to Craig's idea about putting the zigzag cuts on the tank. His method would have achieved good results also and is one I have used in the past.

I was just posting an alternate method that I have found to be more accurate. I try to improve my skills with every build and learn new methods along the way.
 

foose4string

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I totally agree with your rational about targeting a broader range of skill levels.

I was responding to Craig's idea about putting the zigzag cuts on the tank. His method would have achieved good results also and is one I have used in the past.

I was just posting an alternate method that I have found to be more accurate. I try to improve my skills with every build and learn new methods along the way.
Great tip Bob. I like the result you achieved with that method. I guess it's akin to cutting off a glue tab, gluing it to the underside, and butting the ends when making a paper shroud/transition/boat tail. Makes everything flush and virtually seamless.
 

BobH48

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Great tip Bob. I like the result you achieved with that method. I guess it's akin to cutting off a glue tab, gluing it to the underside, and butting the ends when making a paper shroud/transition/boat tail. Makes everything flush and virtually seamless.
Yes, that is correct but I get those results now after practicing on many paper model builds. It's really kind of "nit picking" since you can't tell unless you look close.

I didn't mean to hijack Chris's thread and I like the results Chris is achieving using the kit methods and think they look great. A little CA around the tank tops to harden them and they can be sanded to blend in smoothly.

I'm looking forward to viewing the rest of his Dr. Zooch Soyuz build.

Strengthening the paper cones with CA is a good idea. You really can't do that with printed paper models because it gives a mottled appearance but for a model that will be painted it's a great idea.
 
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hcmbanjo

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To BobH48: You're not hijacking the thread, what's to hijack? That's the great thing about the forum. I'm learning a lot on this build. Believe it or not, I'm half-tempted to try the Strap-ons again! There was still some puckering at the joint on two of them.

To Foose4string: If I do the Strap-ons again, it'll be with more (maybe smaller) zig-zags.

STEP 11: MORE ON THE STRAP-ON BALSA PARTS
The balsa grain in the circles and fins were filled and sanded. All were fitted and slightly recessed in the back of the Strap-Ons. When finished, it’s surprising how strong the Strap-On assemblies are.
I’m already spraying the Witches Hats with grey primer and pre-sanding.

While I decide on the "future" of the current Strap-ons, I'll jump ahead and work on the Interstage assemblies.

STEP 15: BASIC INTERSTAGE
I filled the balsa on the exposed ends of the plugs. Both were glued into their respective cut tubes. I added a small white glue fillet around the edge, not enough to interfere with the Interstage Supports in the next step.

STEP 16: INTERSTAGE SUPPORTS
With the dowel stock still in one piece, I sealed using two coats of sanding sealer. I sanded between coats.
I was a little confused as to which inverted “V” templates to use. The “V” pattern on the Wrap Sheet doesn’t show the ends being angled. It makes it look like two square-end dowels are touching at the top, not cut at an angle for a larger gluing area. The angles of the “V” on the instructions and the pattern sheet both match. So, I compromised between the two. I trimmed some and matched the angle.
If I had one suggestion for the instructions, it would be for the illustrations to match the "V" pattern on the template sheet. It's a moot point.

25. Soyuz Strap On Circles.jpg


26. Soyuz Strap On Circles and Fins Filled.jpg


27. Soyuz Interstage V Patterns.jpg
 
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Fred22

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Man this is coming along well. Thanks for taking the time for this as i am sure anybody with this kit is now learning lots :)
Cheers
Fred
 

hcmbanjo

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More of STEP 16:
When you glue the “Vs” in place, initially use very little white glue. You may have to adjust them before they are permanently set in place. After all five sets were in place there was a gap between the first and last one placed. The inverted V legs should touch all the way around.
I took them all off and spread the V legs a little wider. This time all fit well.
To help place and support the Vs, the instructions have you use the Alignment Piece from Step 2. As the Vs were drying they had a tendency to fall inward.
I found an engine casing set in the middle was a perfect fit. It supported the Vs and let them dry vertically. Just be sure the engine casing doesn’t get glued in.
Re-using the Alignment Guide is a great idea to help with sanding the Vs to the proper, equal height.
Building the Interstage Support structure was easier than I thought it would be. I’d looked at Soyuz pictures for years and wondered how something like this could be made.

STEP 17: MOUNTING THE SECOND STAGE AND NOSECONE
The Second Stage Bells are tiny! I pre-formed as best I could. But, after gluing they weren’t really round.
I sanded the end of a dowel to the same angle as the Bells.
I set the bell on the angled tip, then pressed and rotated the dowel end in the Bell forming them into a round shape.
I’ll have to wait until Monday to glue them in place. I’ve got to buy some copper paint.

28. Soyuz V Struts with Engine Casing.jpg


29. Soyuz Engine Bells with Dowel Form.jpg
 

Rocketcrab

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I agree, this is an excellant thread! I only wish I had waited about 6 months to build mine! Actually, the only problem I had with the build was those witches hats. I have short, stubby fingers, and.... well anyway, this thread could be just what I need to justify buying another one!! In any event, this model really flies great on an Estes C6-5.
 
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Dr.Zooch

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More of STEP 16:Building the Interstage Support structure was easier than I thought it would be. I’d looked at Soyuz pictures for years and wondered how something like this could be made.

Using an engine case to hold the "V"s up is a GREAT idea! I'm gonna use that from now on when I build one of these.

Also- when it comes to making the interstage, I have a bit of a secret to admit to... as a life-long non-drinker and someone who never did drugs, even in the 70s, when I do get a dose of something it really knocks me on my boat tail... such as when getting wisdom teeth extracted. Back when I was considering the R-7 Luna- I had such surgery. A few hours later, I'm laying on the couch, with a Spacecraft Films DVD playing and zonked out of my normally straight gord, when the entire method for doing the interstage came to me! All thanks to my oral surgen and some really good pain pills. I sketched it all out and later in the day built the prototype. So... if you build one of these Russian boosters and ya' say to yourself "Whoever came up with this must have been on drugs." yer' right... legal and perscribed... but drugs none the less. I also had a mouth full of cotton.:rolleyes:
 

hcmbanjo

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I'm glad TRF is back - much faster too!

The upper and lower Spacecraft Fairing Shrouds were cut, formed and glued. Once again, the Zooch shrouds fit great!
The exposed area of the Balsa Adapter will be filled before the shrouds are glued in place.

The balsa cone tip needed a little sanding to allow the SAS Tube to fit.
The top of the dowel was sanded into a semi-curved shape. I sealed the dowel before wrapping it with the Adapter Band Strip.
The Adapter Band Strip was a little short, the fit in the SAS was loose. I simply added an inch of scrap cardstock to the wrap and sanded to fit.
The small SAS Skirt shroud fit perfectly!
Before I glue the SAS nozzles on, I’ll fill and sand smooth the SAS tubing. It’d be impossible to fill the tube seams with the SAS Nozzles in place.

The SAS Stabilization Panels and Hinges were cut from remaining 1/16" balsa. I decided to fill the circular Hinge ends and rear of the Panels before gluing together. They'd be hard to fill afterwards.

30. Soyuz Stabilazation Panels parts.jpg


31. Soyuz finished Stab. Panels & SAS Tube Assembly.jpg
 

hcmbanjo

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More of STEP 17:
The Upper and Lower Fairing Shrouds fit against the Balsa Spacecraft Adapter very well - until I filled the balsa.
I decided to sand the middle section down and refill the now smaller diameter balsa mid-section. I sanded too much!
I ended up adding a cardstock wrap to match the widest parts of the two shrouds. It actually worked well, and now there isn’t any balsa to fill.
The upper shroud overlapped the middle section by less than a millimeter, so I cut the cardstock wrap slightly smaller. It now has a gluing “step” rather than just butting up against the Spacecraft Adapter.
I also cut the small step into the bottom of the cardstock wrap to fit the lower shroud. I know the Spacecraft Adapter is slightly smaller (maybe a millimeter) than it should be, but who’ll know the difference! The fit of the shrouds is much better and stronger with the small steps in place.
The SAS Stabilization Panels and Hinges are now glued together and filled. I’ll prime and sand them before gluing to the upper shroud.

32. Soyuz Upper Body Dry Fit.jpg


33. Soyuz Spacecraft Adapter Shelf.jpg


34. Soyuz Adapter and Shrouds joined.jpg
 

RangerStl

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You're doing some really nice work there. Keep it up! I have a Zooch "Sputnik" and need some more encouragement to get it built!

N
 

hcmbanjo

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Still more of STEP 17:
I sanded the top of the SAS panels to fit the shroud a little better. I wrapped 440 grit sandpaper around a 1" body tube and rounded the inside surface slightly.
The SAS Stabilization Panels were first glued in place with white glue. This gave me the chance to adjust them before they were permanently glued into place.
One SAS Panel is centered over the shroud seam to hide it. I glued these shrouds as normal with the tab, so the overlap is raised. I filed a small notch into the top of the SAS panel to fit the tab overlap at the seam..
After the white glue had dried, I set them with thin CA. I made a puddle of CA on my work board and dipped the tip of a toothpick in it. I touched the tip on the underside of the SAS side piece and the shroud. The CA glue joint is under the SAS panel assembly.
The SAS Nozzles were sanded then trimmed to the proper angle. I actually used the “Double-Glue” method to set them in place. After the white glue dries, I’ll use the CA and toothpick again to set them in for good.
I’m not gluing the bottom shroud and body tube to the upper assembly yet. The top will be painted white, the lower half grey. Both halves are sprayed before gluing together. This way I’ll get a good color separation without masking.

35. Soyuz SAS Panel Top Sanded.jpg


36. Soyuz SAS Panel notched over shroud seam.jpg


37. Soyuz Shroud Sep. for color sep.jpg
 

hcmbanjo

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The first shot is the nozzles in place. They were sealed and sanded before gluing in position.
The upper assembly was sprayed white gloss. I only have gloss paints. I don’t usually buy flat finish paints. I do have a can of flat finish clear, though. I’ll spray overall with the flat clear coat when finished.
I couldn’t find the recommended color, Testor’s Euro Grey #4750 in a spray can. I did find it in the small, brush bottles though. I ended up buying the Testor’s Model Master spray in a can, Euro Grey #FS 36081. I wouldn't normally buy 3 oz. smaller spray cans. I always thought they were too expensive for the size of the can.
But, the results with Testor’s was a great surprise. Good coverage and a very smooth coat. There should be more than enough to paint the entire model with just the one small can.

38.Soyuz SAS Nozzles.jpg


39.Soyuz Upper Section Painted.jpg
 

Dr.Zooch

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Where did you get the Euro Grey #FS 36081 ?
 

hcmbanjo

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I bought the paint at our local hobby store, Colonial Photo and Hobby in Orlando, FL.
It was in the spray paint sales display next to the smaller brush on bottles.

75.Soyuz Euro Gray 1 No. FS 36081.jpg
 

hcmbanjo

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STEP 17 is really long:
I sprayed the Upper Stage before gluing the small engine bells in place. I painted just the outside of the Engine Bells grey.
There isn’t much of a gluing surface on the Bells. There is just the point of the bell to adhere to upper balsa bulkhead.
After the grey dried, I lightly marked the center with pencil. I extended lines in a “X” from the center point. The Bell tips will be glued 3/16" from the center point.
I lightly punched through the 3/16" mark with a pencil point. I widened the punch point with the same “coned” dowel I used to form the small bells. This will give me a small, formed conical indentation to glue the bells into.
A drop of glue was set in the hole and the Bell pushed in place with the coned dowel. After it dries, I’ll apply a little CA around the edges with a toothpick.
After everything is in place and dried, then the bell interior was painted copper.

40.Soyuz Bell Nozzle Dimpled Positions.jpg


41.Soyuz Bell Nozzles Glued.jpg


42.Soyuz Bell Nozzles Copper painted.jpg
 
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