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Cutting Rip-Stop nylon

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Handeman

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I make my own chutes. I had been just cutting the rip-stop with a scissors and sewing. I washed one of those chutes recently and was amazed at the fraying that occurred. It was so bad the seams let loose and ruined the chute.

I had heard about using a soldering iron to cut nylon and had bought a cheap 20 Watt iron for $5 at one of those tool tables. I flattened the tip into a spade shape.

It worked GREAT! I cut out a pattern from 1/4 inch luan plywood put it on the nylon and trace it with the soldering iron. It cuts the nylon like it isn't there. Much easier the trying to use paper patterns and cut it with scissors. It melts the edges when it cuts so there is no fraying at all.

One tip. When you flatten the tip, leave the edges about a 1/32 to 1/16 wide, and rounded. If it's too sharp, the edges of the nylon might melt back together.
 

Micromeister

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Very nifty tip Handeman!
I've been using Olfa rotary wheel knives up to now but this sounds very intersting.
Thanks for sharing.
 

kandsrockets

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I make my own chutes. I had been just cutting the rip-stop with a scissors and sewing. I washed one of those chutes recently and was amazed at the fraying that occurred. It was so bad the seams let loose and ruined the chute.

I had heard about using a soldering iron to cut nylon and had bought a cheap 20 Watt iron for $5 at one of those tool tables. I flattened the tip into a spade shape.

It worked GREAT! I cut out a pattern from 1/4 inch luan plywood put it on the nylon and trace it with the soldering iron. It cuts the nylon like it isn't there. Much easier the trying to use paper patterns and cut it with scissors. It melts the edges when it cuts so there is no fraying at all.

One tip. When you flatten the tip, leave the edges about a 1/32 to 1/16 wide, and rounded. If it's too sharp, the edges of the nylon might melt back together.
We cut all our rip stop with a hot knife. I use the standard chisel point that comes with a radio shack soldering iron. Another thing I did with all of our templates is cover the edges with alum duct tape. This keep the nylon from sticking to your template when you hot cut it.
 

troj

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I had heard about using a soldering iron to cut nylon and had bought a cheap 20 Watt iron for $5 at one of those tool tables. I flattened the tip into a spade shape.
You've made your own hot knife, which is exactly how riggers do it for man-rated stuff.

I'm betting there's a special tool sold specifically for this, but your idea is inexpensive and I bet works just as well!

-Kevin
 

Gillard

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You've made your own hot knife, which is exactly how riggers do it for man-rated stuff.

I'm betting there's a special tool sold specifically for this, but your idea is inexpensive and I bet works just as well!

-Kevin
i have been using a soldering iron to cut rip stop nylon, and there is a blade attachment for a soldering iron that works perfectly
 

Handeman

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i have been using a soldering iron to cut rip stop nylon, and there is a blade attachment for a soldering iron that works perfectly
I'm sure there is a blade available, but I would have to buy it. I've been told I'm so cheap I can squeeze a nickle til the buffalo sh**s.:eek: I can't really argue that too much. Maybe some day.:D

Thanks....
 

Handeman

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Here's one of them: Weller Hot Knife Tip for SP23 Soldering Iron

Some friend of mine started and ran Eagle Creek outdoor and travel gear company, and they cut nylon webbing with turkey de-beakers. :eek:
Whatever works. :D

I'm using what I have because I got the 20W pencil for $4.95. I can probably by another one cheaper then a Weller tip. But like I said earlier about the nickel and the buffalo.....that's just me.
 

luke strawwalker

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Whatever works. :D

I'm using what I have because I got the 20W pencil for $4.95. I can probably by another one cheaper then a Weller tip. But like I said earlier about the nickel and the buffalo.....that's just me.
Nothing wrong with cheap... you live on a farm you learn all sorts of creative ways to get cheap in darn near everything...

A farmer can pinch a nickel til the buffalo sh!*s and then use the manure in the garden... LOL:) Later! OL JR :)
 

The EGE

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I cut mine with nice sewing scissors... the edges don't fray at all. My mom (I'm a teenager...) machine-sews the edges, and I've never had a problem with fraying.
 

Stymye

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I use a good scissor and hem the edges, makes for a very strong chute



 
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Handeman

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I cut mine with nice sewing scissors... the edges don't fray at all. My mom (I'm a teenager...) machine-sews the edges, and I've never had a problem with fraying.
You sound like you have to have your Mom sew it because you're a teenager?:confused:
Sounds like you need to have your Mom teach you how to use the sewing machine. That's a skill you may not use much, but I know it will come in handy at some point.
 

Handeman

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I use a good scissor and hem the edges, makes for a very strong chute
I did the same with the first chutes I made. Worked great. Until I tossed them in the wash machine.

I've found the hot blade works even better then the scissors for cutting the nylon.
 
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