Coronavirus: What questions do you have?

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cwbullet

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I am deeply disappointed in the Moderna vaccine. Did I get a third arm? No. 5G reception? Nope. And now I hear I was supposed to become magnetic and didn't get that either? WTF man?! I guess I shoulda gotten Pfizer.
I was hoping for bulletproof and levitation.
 

BABAR

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@cwbullet

Any estimates on what percentage of those declining vaccination are COVID survivors (previously known infected.)?

these people may think they don’t need the vaccine as they believe they can’t get it again. I think that belief is in error, as acquired immunity from original strain infection vs the new variants seems to be less reliable than that gained by the mRNA vaccines.
 

cwbullet

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@cwbullet

Any estimates on what percentage of those declining vaccination are COVID survivors (previously known infected.)?

these people may think they don’t need the vaccine as they believe they can’t get it again. I think that belief is in error, as acquired immunity from original strain infection vs the new variants seems to be less reliable than that gained by the mRNA vaccines.
I do not have numbers I can release. The only numbers I have are on the military and that is protected.
 

PatD

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I thought that might be a good outcome for me but then I re-read it and it was tentacles, not testicles. I am one short of a full set. Oh well...
Knew a guy in the army that jumped off a tank fender in the dark. Unluckily, he landed on a tankers bar that was stuck upright in the mud. His last name was Ott, thereafter he was 'one shot Ott'. :) He didn't think it was funny in the least.
 

OverTheTop

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Knew a guy in the army that jumped off a tank fender in the dark. Unluckily, he landed on a tankers bar that was stuck upright in the mud. His last name was Ott, thereafter he was 'one shot Ott'. :) He didn't think it was funny in the least.
ROFL!!! Ouch! Mine didn't involve tanks fortunately. It was an exceptionally rare medical condition (about four cases now on the entire interweb)) and not cancer. Very lucky. It was spotted after one of the guys at work had a run-in with testicular cancer and was talking about it. I thought I hadn't checked for a while, and after going home then said "That's odd". The rest is history. So check yourselves guys, it can save your life.
 

cwbullet

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Covid News:

U.S. cases of COVID-19 are up 70% over the previous week and deaths are up 26%. The Delta variant is the predominant variant worldwide with the Lambda variant increasing in parts of South America. The variants are still covered by the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) by 88 and 96% respectively. Almost all deaths and hospitalizations are in those unvaccinated.
 

Bill S

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Chuck, any data as to how the J&J vaccine is faring vs variants, etc? My casual research shows about 60%-ish. Since I had the J&J this is of particular interest to me.
 

Marc_G

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Chuck, any data as to how the J&J vaccine is faring vs variants, etc? My casual research shows about 60%-ish. Since I had the J&J this is of particular interest to me.
++ This. My wife had the J&J. She doesn't have the greatest immune system. I'm concerned for her. Would love to hear data as to whether a booster of Pfizer or Moderna would be helpful for her (studies are ongoing to determine safety and efficacy of this mix n match).
 

BABAR

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Marc_G said:
No superpowers from Pfizer but gosh these octopus tentacles come in handy...


I thought that might be a good outcome for me but then I re-read it and it was tentacles, not testicles. I am one short of a full set. Oh well...
Why do you need a full set of octopus testicles?
 

ksaves2

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That is not bad advice. I have began recommending first or elbow bumps.
Yeah if someone picks their nose or coughs into their hands, then absent mindedly offers their hand to someone to shake, transference of whatever is on their hands to the next person occurs. Now that person picks their nose or bites their nails and viola, whatever was on their hands in the form of a respiratory virus is now introduced to their respiratory system.
Now one can argue whether or not critical numbers are transferred but it is a potential vector nonetheless.

Take for instance an uncovered sneeze at Wal-Mart. Some poor sap unaware of the poor bastids sneeze comes along just after the "sneeze event" and walks into the invisible cloud of "vermin" suspended in the air. Sure the particles will be dispersing over time but if one gets enough viral particles inhaled, illness can result. Eeeewwwwwwwwww!!
Kurt
 

boomtube-mk2

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I received the Madonna vaccine and started making stupid political comments about subjects I knew nothing about using a phony British accent.

Actually I received the Madurna vaccine and I became reclusive, standoffish and insular . . . no wait, I'm always that way . . . never mind.
 

BABAR

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I received the Madonna vaccine and started making stupid political comments about subjects I knew nothing about using a phony British accent.

it could be worse.

you could be involuntarily and spontaneously belting out, “Like a Virgin…” in a phony British accent.

that would be really bad.

on multiple levels.
 

kuririn

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you could be involuntarily and spontaneously belting out, “Like a Virgin…” in a phony British accent.
Or start checking into luxury hotels and acting like a spoiled brat making ridiculous demands.
(Worked in one, good friends with the assistant manager).
 

rocketsaway

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As in rocketry...Show me the DATA.

July 19, 2021 1:52 pm ET
A tremendous number of government and private policies affecting kids are based on one number: 335. That is how many children under 18 have died with a Covid diagnosis code in their record, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yet the CDC, which has 21,000 employees, hasn’t researched each death to find out whether Covid caused it or if it involved a pre-existing medical condition.

Without these data, the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices decided in May that the benefits of two-dose vaccination outweigh the risks for all kids 12 to 15. I’ve written hundreds of peer-reviewed medical studies, and I can think of no journal editor who would accept the claim that 335 deaths resulted from a virus without data to indicate if the virus was incidental or causal, and without an analysis of relevant risk factors such as obesity.

My research team at Johns Hopkins worked with the nonprofit FAIR Health to analyze approximately 48,000 children under 18 diagnosed with Covid in health-insurance data from April to August 2020. Our report found a mortality rate of zero among children without a pre-existing medical condition such as leukemia. If that trend holds, it has significant implications for healthy kids and whether they need two vaccine doses. The National Education Association has been debating whether to urge schools to require vaccination before returning to school in person. How can they or anyone debate the issue without the right data?

By Marty Makary
Martin Adel "Marty" Makary is an American surgeon, professor, and author.
He practices surgical oncology and gastrointestinal laparoscopic surgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital
 

Marc_G

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Could you explain how a Covid vaccine was produced in less than a year ?
The tech already existed and has been moving forward for several other needs, going through the usual process. The virus was sequenced before most people knew there was a real threat and the necessary spike protein nucleic acid sequence to use was quickly identified. Animal model tests were done in early spring and the first shots went into arms in phase 1 human trials in May. By early June it was apparent that appropriate antibodies were being raised in those that got the shots and various doses were tried in a larger set of trial participants. No safety concerns came up and the trials escalated to larger phase three trials over the summer.

At that point the limiting factors usually applying to clinical trials became moot: getting volunteers suitable for the trial ( there were plenty of willing volunteers to nearly instantly populate the trials), and because the disease was so prevalent and the effect of the vaccine so dramatic, it didn't take long to get a statistically significant result. That two companies with technologically similar but different vaccines were able to make it to market at nearly the same time shows how ready the mRNA tech was prior to this crisis.

Meanwhile the vaccines were being manufactured on contingency based on pre orders so it could be distributed as soon as approval under EUA happened. Of course, if the data sucked then a lot of vaccine would have gone in the dumpster.

Short story: we got lucky that the technology had come as far as it had when this pandemic started.
 

ThirstyBarbarian

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The tech already existed and has been moving forward for several other needs, going through the usual process. The virus was sequenced before most people knew there was a real threat and the necessary spike protein nucleic acid sequence to use was quickly identified. Animal model tests were done in early spring and the first shots went into arms in phase 1 human trials in May. By early June it was apparent that appropriate antibodies were being raised in those that got the shots and various doses were tried in a larger set of trial participants. No safety concerns came up and the trials escalated to larger phase three trials over the summer.

At that point the limiting factors usually applying to clinical trials became moot: getting volunteers suitable for the trial ( there were plenty of willing volunteers to nearly instantly populate the trials), and because the disease was so prevalent and the effect of the vaccine so dramatic, it didn't take long to get a statistically significant result. That two companies with technologically similar but different vaccines were able to make it to market at nearly the same time shows how ready the mRNA tech was prior to this crisis.

Meanwhile the vaccines were being manufactured on contingency based on pre orders so it could be distributed as soon as approval under EUA happened. Of course, if the data sucked then a lot of vaccine would have gone in the dumpster.

Short story: we got lucky that the technology had come as far as it had when this pandemic started.
If it had happened a few years ago, it would have taken a lot longer.
 

BABAR

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Amazing accomplishment, maybe not a home run but at least a triple on the first two up to bat. About the only real down side of the first mRNA vaccines was the refrigeration requirement. Bad mouth pharmaceutical companies all you want for their prices, but those involved in the development, testing, and deployment of these vaccines are heroes in my book.
 

cwbullet

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Could you explain how a Covid vaccine was produced in less than a year ?
Already answered, but the bottom line is we have been looking at RNA vaccines because they are lower risk and more focused than DNA and protein-based vaccines. They looked at the mRNA vaccines for eBola, SARS, and MERS before it, but the need dissipated too soon for the vaccine to come to fruition and the at-risk population is smaller. Today, unlike in the past, we can quickly get the genetic sequence and create a vaccine in no time. It is an amazing time for genetics.

To scare you more, we are testing equipment for crime scene evidence and nail down a profile in no time. The special forces have been using it in the middle east for years. It is almost like it was lifted from movies. The sample size need is next to nothing.
 

TigerHawk

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I believe the first case of the Lambda-variation has been found in Houston, Texas recently. Is that true?
 

rharshberger

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Already answered, but the bottom line is we have been looking at RNA vaccines because they are lower risk and more focused than DNA and protein-based vaccines. They looked at the mRNA vaccines for eBola, SARS, and MERS before it, but the need dissipated too soon for the vaccine to come to fruition and the at-risk population is smaller. Today, unlike in the past, we can quickly get the genetic sequence and create a vaccine in no time. It is an amazing time for genetics.

To scare you more, we are testing equipment for crime scene evidence and nail down a profile in no time. The special forces have been using it in the middle east for years. It is almost like it was lifted from movies. The sample size need is next to nothing.
Sample size like the 30 year old cold case that was solved with a DNA sample size of only 15 human cells, the article was just in the news a couple of days ago.
 

hball55

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I think these covid variants are not natural, but engineered. Viruses are supposed to get weaker in time, but these variants aren’t following that path, unless we are being lied to just so we can continue to be controlled.
 

boatgeek

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I think these covid variants are not natural, but engineered. Viruses are supposed to get weaker in time, but these variants aren’t following that path, unless we are being lied to just so we can continue to be controlled.
Viruses are like anything else. They evolve to get a competitive advantage. Often that means evolving to become less deadly, sometimes it means evolving to become more infectious (Delta). Sometimes the virus makes us evolve to survive (smallpox, Black Death).
 

dhbarr

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I think these covid variants are not natural, but engineered. Viruses are supposed to get weaker in time, but these variants aren’t following that path, unless we are being lied to just so we can continue to be controlled.
Is that how you think the flu has worked for the past 500 years?
 

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Is that how you think the flu has worked for the past 500 years?
That is absolutely not how the FLU has worked. It has absolutely gotten stronger, but we adapted to make better and better vaccines. The same will happen with COVID.
 

cwbullet

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93717.jpg.webp



The delta variant has a faster replication rate, a reduced incubation period, and greater viral shedding. It causes our body to produce roughly 1000 times more viruses than prior versions of the virus and is 50-64% more infectious. This accounts for the high infection rate among immunized and unimmunized patients.
 
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