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Coronavirus: What questions do you have?

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NateB

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This was your 2nd shot, right? I hope you bounce back more quickly than that first shot.
1 of my coworkers was hit pretty hard after her 2nd dose. She said it lasted about 30 hours and then she felt fine again, and added it was definitely worth it.
 

BABAR

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The vaccine has kicked by behind. I have had a fever, chills, body aches, and fatigue. I stayed home from work today to recover.

I would get it again. I will say that the vaccine has to have less long-lasting side effects than catching COVID. I have several 18-30-year-olds that I tracking that have heart failure with an EF less than 40.
Sorry about your relapse. Keep your legs moving. prevent those Deep venous thromboses and Pulmonary Emboli!

all I got for my second shot was a really sore arm for about a day and a half, I was tired day two, but that may have just been cuz I slept poorly from the sore arm.

unless people have liver or kidney disease, I’d just say take 400mn Motrin and a couple of Tylenol every 6 hours for the first 24 hours after both first and second doses.


@cwbullet , any official word on Covid variants that are definitely resistant to vaccine? I saw a report of one that seemed resistant to monoclonal antibodies from previous Covid Infections, but you can’t believe everything your read.
 

cwbullet

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This was your 2nd shot, right? I hope you bounce back more quickly than that first shot.
Back to work today. 80% recovered from the shot. Arm still hurts like heck.
 

cwbullet

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1 of my coworkers was hit pretty hard after her 2nd dose. She said it lasted about 30 hours and then she felt fine again, and added it was definitely worth it.
Concur - back to work this am.
 

NOLA_BAR

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Just in time for Mardi Gras.
Ha, yes technically that has been cancelled, meaning no parades. The bars are closed right now, but only for inside service. The city is still expecting crowds, mainly from out of town.

For the last few years we have left town for Mardi Gras week to travel out west or Florida. Schools have the whole week off, and it is popular for family’s with kids to either go skiing or go to Disney World.
 

cwbullet

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The city is still expecting crowds, mainly from out of town.

For the last few years we have left town for Mardi Gras week to travel out west or Florida. Schools have the whole week off, and it is popular for family’s with kids to either go skiing or go to Disney World.
That is the “Typhoid Mary” type problem. I guess if you travel that you might be the Typhoid Mary for Florida.
 

NOLA_BAR

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That is the “Typhoid Mary” type problem. I guess if you travel that you might be the Typhoid Mary for Florida.
Ha, that was pre-COVID! Not going anywhere this year. Staying home and away from people. We have been very cautious throughout this whole thing, staying home as much as possible. No eating out, no church services, no inside family visits. Our son is in school, so that is probably our biggest risk.
 

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Ha, that was pre-COVID! Not going anywhere this year. Staying home and away from people. We have been very cautious throughout this whole thing, staying home as much as possible. No eating out, no church services, no inside family visits. Our son is in school, so that is probably our biggest risk.
That is pretty much my life. Home, work, Home - repeat.
 

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OK this may sound dumb but I have to ask it....Why are they using such long needles to give the vaccine ? Also this stuff is not thick like penicillin so why aren't they using the air guns like the military uses? I remember when I went thru basic training the would take us down to medical 50 at a time roll up the sleeves and bang bang bang 50 men or women inoculated in 5 minutes. I'm sorry but with all of the smart people that have been involved in all of this it's just seems like there has been very little forward thinking. My hat is off to the folks who develop the vaccine but you would think there would have been parallel tracks with people who understand packaging, moving, and dispensing products. I mean when I see the videos of the folks getting the shots it reminds me of the 1960's with all of the long needles, glass vials and such. I'm probably wrong but just wondering. :)
 

Nytrunner

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Maybe it has to do with the storage requirements?

The old vials may be more conducive to packaging and handling at the cold temps needed
 

NateB

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The needles are standard length for IM injections and a fairly small gauge, smaller than what I normally use on patients.

The jet injectors fell out of use due to cross contamination from pt to pt.
 

NateB

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Our hospital is vaccinating about 1000 people a day. The issue isn't the administration process, but the availability of the vaccine. Our state health department says Indiana isn't receiving enough vaccines to cover the demand and cannot open it up to more people yet.
 

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Florida has been allocated 2 million vaccines but only half have been administered yet when you call up any facility they’re either out or phone lines busy or server overloaded.
 

JLP1

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Thanks Nate I didn't know about the air injectors, I guess I have an aversion to needles. When I see them on the TV those things look like they are 5 inches long. 😋
 

NateB

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Thanks Nate I didn't know about the air injectors, I guess I have an aversion to needles. When I see them on the TV those things look like they are 5 inches long. 😋
Pfizer recommends a 25g and 1-1.5" long needle attached to a 1ml syringe and only injecting 0.3ml in the deltoid muscle, it's a pretty easy shot. The extra length you see in pictures are different types safety caps built in to protect the dirty sharp after use.

For comparison, I always keep 18g IVs and 18g 21g needles with 3ml syringes in my pocket at work.

You also get over any fear of needles pretty quick when you practice on each other or have students practice on you before you let them touch a real patient.
 

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Got Pfizer vaccination last night. As the father of a Type1 diabetic, and former kid getting allergy shots, I have lots of experience with needles.
Insulin uses a pretty short needle (being, subcutaneous vs intramuscular) so that needle looked pretty long to me! Having said that, I barely felt anything. It is a very thin needle.
 

cwbullet

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Got Pfizer vaccination last night. As the father of a Type1 diabetic, and former kid getting allergy shots, I have lots of experience with needles.
Insulin uses a pretty short needle (being, subcutaneous vs intramuscular) so that needle looked pretty long to me! Having said that, I barely felt anything. It is a very thin needle.
If no pain yet, that is surprising. 80% have pain and swelling in their arm. 15-18 have chills. 10% have a headache. The rest are under 10%
 

SwingWing

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Oh, the arm is a little sore, just didn't feel much at the time of the jab.
It's similar to a tetanus shot
 

cwbullet

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Oh, the arm is a little sore, just didn't feel much at the time of the jab.
It's similar to a tetanus shot
That fits. I would plan for a day off after the second shot. 50-60% require a day off.
 

cwbullet

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On a slight update: As many as 10+ vaccines may be released on the World in the next 1-4 months. Many of them use the only technology of a live weakened or attenuated virus that delivers a part or parts of the genetic code of the virus to increase the immune response when you become infected. Many contain a snippet to DNA or RNA (not mRNA) to close for a protein that will induce the response. Many quote a reduction in symptomatic infections or severe infections in early trials of 35-90%.

There some reports of variants of COVID that are starting to become "resistant" to the vaccines. It is more than the vaccine is less effective against some variants. 5% loss of effectiveness is still very effective.

More to come.
 

Sandy H.

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Many of them use the only technology of a live weakened or attenuated virus that delivers a part or parts of the genetic code of the virus to increase the immune response
I imagine this could be due to cost, ability to produce in volume etc., but in a resource-unlimited scenario (not real world, of course) is this type of vaccine considered equal to the current vaccines or is it likely to have better/worse effictiveness and/or side effects? Would it be likely that this type of vaccine can keep pace with the mutations faster than the current version?

I am completely out of my realm of knowledge with this type of topic, so it is an honest question, not an effort to stir controversy or point fingers - just trying to get more educated for when I get my opportunity to be vaccinated.

Be well!

Sandy.
 

Marc_G

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Chuck-

I hope your recovery continues unabated.

I've got a question which I don't think I've asked yet. I've heard chatter from some quarters to the effect that WHO is now recommending lower cycle counts on PCR tests, related to a memo released on January 20th. The memo (this one) doesn't actually call for this; it says read the instructions. But, the fact that the memo was released on inauguration day makes for good conspiracy theory, to the effect that lower cycle counts coinciding with a new President resulting in lower case counts (and fewer COVID-diagnosed deaths) is proof of a liberal conspiracy around COVID-19 being overblown. I'm surprised I can even type that sentence without the letter Q.

Anyway, I'd like to debunk this for the folks I'm in communication with. I've heard of no plans to change the diagnostic testing criteria for PCR-based COVID-19 testing, to the effect of lowering the cycle threshold for diagnosing positives. Have you heard anything about this?

I've pretty much stopped wasting my breath on folks spouting conspiracies, but when I can send some facts their way, I try to do my part :)
 

cwbullet

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Chuck-

I hope your recovery continues unabated.

I've got a question which I don't think I've asked yet. I've heard chatter from some quarters to the effect that WHO is now recommending lower cycle counts on PCR tests, related to a memo released on January 20th. The memo (this one) doesn't actually call for this; it says read the instructions. But, the fact that the memo was released on inauguration day makes for good conspiracy theory, to the effect that lower cycle counts coinciding with a new President resulting in lower case counts (and fewer COVID-diagnosed deaths) is proof of a liberal conspiracy around COVID-19 being overblown. I'm surprised I can even type that sentence without the letter Q.

Anyway, I'd like to debunk this for the folks I'm in communication with. I've heard of no plans to change the diagnostic testing criteria for PCR-based COVID-19 testing, to the effect of lowering the cycle threshold for diagnosing positives. Have you heard anything about this?

I've pretty much stopped wasting my breath on folks spouting conspiracies, but when I can send some facts their way, I try to do my part :)
We have no plans to change our testing and I am hearing nothing out of the CDC and NIH. There is not evidence of a high rate of false positives and the only thing that will make a positive PCR is viral RNA. The test we use is similar to the text we use to catch murders. The RNA is magnified so we only need a few cells of the virus to get a positive. If you test positive, you have the virus.

What the WHO is arguing is that you may no longer be a spreader so we should test again. This makes no sense and is likely politically motivated. You are more likely to get a false negative than a false positive with this test. If I happen to order a second test and it comes out negative, it is more likely that the second test is a false negative. Some of this changes based on prevalence in your location but at this stage, COVID is everywhere.
 

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