bringing out flame colors

Discussion in 'Photo/Video Tips' started by watermelonman, Sep 5, 2016.

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  1. Sep 5, 2016 #1

    watermelonman

    watermelonman

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    This picture is not mine, but long stood out at me due to the vibrance in the flame -
    [​IMG]

    I have kept RAW files of most of my rocket shots, and recently purchased Lightroom, but have not been able to get that type of results. Anyone have any post processing tips for bringing the flame out to crazy levels?
     
  2. Sep 6, 2016 #2

    ChrisAttebery

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    To me it looks underexposed. Maybe a twilight launch?
     
  3. Sep 6, 2016 #3

    Oberon

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    I think it is underexposed, but a daylight shot. Most colored flames will badly overexpose and you won't see any detail. So you need to adjust the exposure settings for the flame - the result will underexpose the rest of the shot somewhat, but it will make the flame stand out. I think you have to do it on the camera itself before you take the shot for best results.
     
  4. Sep 6, 2016 #4

    Viking

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    Agreed. Definitely underexposed so the flame is correctly exposed, then pushed a few stops in post and probably a curve tweak to compress the highlights, and a saturation tweak to add a bit more colour.
     
  5. Sep 6, 2016 #5

    scsager

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    No special secrets or quick fixes. In this example, I started with a badly underexposed and slightly out of focus shot.
    This was shot with a cheap 500mm manual focus mirror lens.

    Over the years I got comfortable with ACDSee, and that's what I use instead of Lightroom.

    Tilt, Exposure, Contrast, Burning, Dodging adjustments. Here is the before and after.

    IMGP4587.jpg

    IMGP4587a.jpg
     
  6. Sep 6, 2016 #6

    mikec

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  7. Sep 6, 2016 #7

    watermelonman

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    Wonderful. Thanks everyone!
     
  8. Sep 6, 2016 #8

    ChrisAttebery

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    We'll have to compare notes at XPRS if you make it.
     
  9. Sep 6, 2016 #9

    jadebox

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    Ditto. :)

    I also set my camera to underexpose by 2 stops on sunny days. It helps reduce overexposure of highlights (bright areas such as reflections or rocket flames). Fixing underexposed areas in Lightroom or Photoshop to bring out details works pretty well. But, you can't fix an overexposed area that's lost all detail.

    -- Roger
     
  10. Sep 6, 2016 #10

    FredA

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    Who's purple motor? What formula?
     
  11. Sep 7, 2016 #11

    watermelonman

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    Oh, the original photograph is nothing more than a Cesaroni J316 with some serious photography tweaks.
     
  12. Sep 7, 2016 #12

    FredA

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    Oh, the original photograph is nothing more than a Cesaroni J316 with some serious photography tweaks.

    Well now, in PS, you can do anything you want....thought this was about TAKING the photo....
     
  13. Sep 21, 2016 #13

    Tonimus

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    Yup. Sometimes I've even gone 3 stops. It really is amazing how well Lightroom can bring out the dark areas. I almost always shoot one stop under when outdoors doing regular photos, just to keep from blowing out something I missed.
     
  14. Sep 21, 2016 #14

    watermelonman

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    Both! For it to come out well you need good original material, seems like simple underexposing is the main ticket.
     
  15. Sep 21, 2016 #15

    TangoJuliet

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    Underexpose and ALWAYS shoot in RAW! Which means you'll HAVE to post-process, but it's really the only way to get professional results.
     

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