Blade suggestions for Tube Cutting Jig

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j.a.duke

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I've built a tube cutting jig based on

Tube Cutting Jig

I think I need a single-edged razor blade that's longer than the standard one shown in the picture and that I've been using. I'd like to be able to have a single blade mounted to handle all the tube sizes from BT-2 to 80 without having the move the blade up or down based on the size.

I've tried a scraper blade (about 3" long), but it really isn't as sharp as a razor blade (and it's double-edged).

Has anyone built this jig (or a similar style) and what did you use to cut the tube?

Thanks.

Cheers,
Jon
 

Micromeister

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The Blade in the photo sure looks like a standard single edge razor blade to me.
One of the difficulties I see with the jig design is it doesn't look like the blade is very easily adjustable for different diameter tubes.
I use a #24 or #2 X-acto blade that I strop to razor sharpness in my jig. It works very well on just about any thickness tube, I've used it to cut Mailing tubes, but it was designed to do standard and heavy walled craftpaper tubes like Estes and Quest tubes.

I think your likely to need a strop and jewelers rouge to bring whatever blade your attaching up to razor sharpness and need to make yourself a set of mandrels to fit inside the tubes your cutting.
Hope this helps a little.

Sharpening Strops-a-sm_5 dif strops & cake rouge_10-26-06.jpg


Buds Strop-e1_3pic .5x3x18 RedOak & Leather pg_10-20-09.JPG
 

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kandsrockets

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I've built a tube cutting jig based on

Tube Cutting Jig

I think I need a single-edged razor blade that's longer than the standard one shown in the picture and that I've been using. I'd like to be able to have a single blade mounted to handle all the tube sizes from BT-2 to 80 without having the move the blade up or down based on the size.

I've tried a scraper blade (about 3" long), but it really isn't as sharp as a razor blade (and it's double-edged).

Has anyone built this jig (or a similar style) and what did you use to cut the tube?

Thanks.

Cheers,
Jon
I have a jig like that one and used a carpet blade. Works like a charm. I have cut up to 5.5" tubes on it. Anything larger I just use my table saw with a jig I made for it.
 

blackjack2564

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I've built a tube cutting jig based on

Tube Cutting Jig

I'd like to be able to have a single blade mounted to handle all the tube sizes from BT-2 to 80 without having the move the blade up or down based on the size.

Jon
Simple, just place it[blade] for cutting the largest tube you will cut. Smaller sizes can be elevated up to the blade by placing the correct size [thickness] board under it to bring the tube up to the blade.
 

j.a.duke

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The Blade in the photo sure looks like a standard single edge razor blade to me.
One of the difficulties I see with the jig design is it doesn't look like the blade is very easily adjustable for different diameter tubes.
I use a #24 or #2 X-acto blade that I strop to razor sharpness in my jig. It works very well on just about any thickness tube, I've used it to cut Mailing tubes, but it was designed to do standard and heavy walled craftpaper tubes like Estes and Quest tubes.
John,

I've seen your jig previously and would love to be able to clone it, however, at the moment, don't have the tools & time to do so. I'm working on mandrels, but have been using tube couplers reinforced with centering rings on each end as the backup for the blade.

From the pictures, it would appear that the blade tip is pressing against the jig base, while the shank is secured somehow. How do you adjust your blade for larger tube sizes? Also, do you have picture from the left end of the jig? I'd like to see if my assumption about how the blade is working is correct.

Also, when you cut, which side of the jig are you on? I've set mine up that I'm pushing against the fence and blade (as I'm right-handed), but thinking about things, it might be easier and more accurate to pull the tube into the cutter and fence (sort of like "Japanese" pull-cut saws vs. western push-cut).

Thanks,

Cheers,
Jon
 

Micromeister

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John,

I've seen your jig previously and would love to be able to clone it, however, at the moment, don't have the tools & time to do so. I'm working on mandrels, but have been using tube couplers reinforced with centering rings on each end as the backup for the blade.

From the pictures, it would appear that the blade tip is pressing against the jig base, while the shank is secured somehow. How do you adjust your blade for larger tube sizes? Also, do you have picture from the left end of the jig? I'd like to see if my assumption about how the blade is working is correct.

Also, when you cut, which side of the jig are you on? I've set mine up that I'm pushing against the fence and blade (as I'm right-handed), but thinking about things, it might be easier and more accurate to pull the tube into the cutter and fence (sort of like "Japanese" pull-cut saws vs. western push-cut).

Thanks,

Cheers,
Jon
Joh:
My #24 or #2 blade is held in a Hacksawed slot by a 10-24 brass Thumbscrew. Adjusting for larger tubes I simple extend or retract both blade edge and angle with the tip resting in the 0" grove scored across the base. I've cut as large as 5" dia. craft tube tubes and 4" super thick mailing tubes with this jig though I belived it would be quicker to use some sort of saw on the 1/4"thick mailing tubes LOL!!!
I'm left handed which might make a bit of difference but since we're still cutting off the good part on the Base side of the jig it shouldn't make all that much difference. What may make a difference is the amount of mandrel that remains inside the tube on the LEFT side away for the jig while using this area to hold and turn the tube during cutting.
I think I do I'll attach what I have anyway:)
I posted a complete parts list for this fixture in the thread about cutting tubes with a mitre saw just the other day.
Hope these helps:
 

rocketguy101

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@Micro I took the liberty of compiling your parts list, pictures and comments into a pdf file for future inquiries...
 

MarkII

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I have heard of a design that has the blade mounted on a pivoting holder above the tube. Different tube diameters are accommodated by adjusting the blade holder up or down. Another way would be to have the blade holder mounted in a vertical slot so that it can be slid up or down to the correct height and then locked into place. In both of these mounts, the blade is located above the tube, not below it. A channel is still used to align the tube and keep it squared up and perpendicular to the blade, but the blade is mounted on a sturdy stationary arm on the upright part of the channel or just above it, and the cutting is done from the topside as the tube is rotated.

MarkII
 

cwbullet

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I am surprised some has not tried to produce that type of jig for a profit.
 

dave carver

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You will find Testors blades the sharpest out there. These things rival surgical blades for sharpness.

Be extra careful with them, they will cut off pieces of you as easily as balsa;)
 

jcDerRedMax

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Rotary cutting blades are available in most craft, fabric stores. They are nice because the larger size means you can mount them farther away from the angle and thus have room for an adjustable track to move the blade in or out as needed.
 

Commonwealth.Net

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I use a "Chop Saw" with a 60 tooth blade with no offset.
Cuts any tube in 1 second.
I can cust Estes type and high power type tubes.
Total investment about $100.00
 
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