Bike (as in bicycle) question

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Peartree

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Not wanting to hijack the existing thread on bicycling, I wanted to ask a question because I know that there are quite a few knowledgeable riders here.

My wife and I are tired of trying to keep old Wal-mart bicycles in operating condition and, with most of our kids out of the house, we finally have a few dollars so we no longer have to buy the cheapest thing out there.

Here are our desires:

We currently don't ride much or not at all. I try to run three days a week, but have been fighting foot injuries that sometimes make that difficult. I do, however, try to get a bike ride in very occasionally and can ride five or ten miles with no great difficulty other than my current bike doesn't shift into the upper range and I'm stuck with the lower gears.

We often walk in the evening by ourselves or more often, with our dogs. We can easily walk two to three miles and have occasionally walked five or more.

My wife doesn't ride because one of our kids borrowed it and it's no longer ride-able.

We'd like to ride more than we do and perhaps trade biking for some of our walking (hey, the dogs are still going to want to walk).

We would most likely ride on semi-improved surfaces, either neighborhood streets or on park trails (usually packed dirt trails or crushed limestone) or on one of the local towpath trails (converted canal towpaths) or rails-to-trails that are either crushed limestone or asphalt.

I have been told that what we need is not a mountain bike, since we don't do true off road trails, but more of a hybrid bike that would be good for both paved streets and improved trails.

Yesterday we finally went to the good bike store and talked (mostly listened) to them.

What they were/are recommending is the Trek Verve which has three models 1,2, or 3 which all have the same frame but which have increasing quality tires, drivetrain, brakes, etc. (and increasing cost).

Having usually spent under $200 for a bike, and often less than $100, this is an entirely new world to me.

So, here are my questions:


What do you know about the Trek Verve? Is it a good bike? Is it a good match for what we do?

Is there another brand/model that you would recommend?

Is that a decent/fair price for an entry level bike for people like us?



Thanks for your help and advice.
 

rharshberger

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Trek makes excellent products, I have ridden several over the years but never owned one. However a number of friends of mine have owned Treks. Another brand that I would recommend is Giant, I have been riding a mostly original solid frame 1993 Giant Rincon 26" MTB for the last 24 years, only replacing the seat, tires and grips, plus regular maintenance, Giant still honors the lifetime gaurantee on it. The better the quality the more enjoyable and lasting the bike will be.

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Woody's Workshop

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I have a Mongoose. Not one of new cheapies with a heavy steel from. Mine is Aluminum Alloy, light as a feather. It's about 25 years old. Back in the day, I paid well over $500 for it.
It's in need of some TLC, but...no funds right now. Needs cables removed and lubed, new brake rubber and general chain/sproket cleaning & lube.
But the rims are still round and no loose spokes, tires are still good shape too.
With 15 gears I use to ride some long wheelies with it racking through 5 gears.
Schwinn use to be a big name in bikes. I know they have a cheapy line now for the Big Box Store to compete. But if you can find a dealer I believe the good ones are still made.
Biking is a lot easier on the body than running, that's for sure!
Good Luck with what ever you choose to buy.
 

SwingWing

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What you have there is a hybrid style bike. This is probably a good choice for the mission you describe. Weather it's Trek, or any one of 20 other brands, getting the right style is good.
Hybrid bikes tend to have an up-right riding stance, lower gearing (mountain components vs road) heavier frames, with some suspension and slightly wider than road tires. they are great for MUP (multi-user paved) trails and occasional dirt/limestone trails. Overall good choice for what you describe
 

kclo4

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Hybrid bikes tend to just be awful messes of the worst features of road bikes and mountain bikes. They tend to have poor components and are generally very heavy. They call them hybrid, but they just plain cannot be used for off road trail riding. They are kind of soulless, the kind of bike you buy then leave in the garage.

With that said, if the vertical seating position is the only style that is comfortable for you to be on for an extended amount of time, it's the right bike.


Cyclocross/gravel bikes are very near to standard road bike geometry but offer clearance for slightly larger knobby or semi knobby tires. If you don't mind that sort of geometry this style of bike will support the gravel paths and generally be much faster. They come with road bike drop bars and the associated brake/shifter mechanisms, and you will either like or hate this setup.

Hardtail (no rear suspension) mountain bikes that do not have a "race style" geometry (meaning aggressively leaned over forward) can be nearly as comfortable as the hybrid type, but may be more fun in all situations. You can put a skinny slick road tire to ride fast, all the way to knobby off road tires, and anything in-between. If you get one with front suspension bumps will be easier on the wrists. Basically a proper mountain bike will do anything better than a "hybrid" bike, you just pick the tires for the application.

Commuter/"Fitness" bikes are usually a road style geometry but usually come with mountain bike style handle bars and may actually be more of a "hybrid" bike than the model you listed. This setup may serve you will also, but again, anything a commuter bike can do, a mountain bike can do as well.

The best thing I can say is to ride as many at the bike shops as possible of the different types I listed, or others if you are inclined. In the cyclocross, road bike, and mountain bike side of things they sometimes have "demo" bikes that you can rent to try out before you buy. They will usually take the rental price off if you buy a bike with that shop. This is generally reserved for the more expensive side of bikes though.

On that topic, if you think you will use the bikes more at all, spend more than you ever thought you would or should, if you can. You don't need crazy carbon fiber race stuff, but with the increase in budget the bikes you get will just be plain more enjoyable to ride, and generally the quality and reliability of the components goes up as well. Short of occasional tune ups or damage from mishaps you just plain don't have to worry about stuff not working.

If you can, buy last year model stuff that's on sale. You can often get good deals or haggle the price down further because they need to move those bikes.
 
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georgegassaway

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Advice I'll toss in is to be sure that the bike frame is the right size for each of you.

And if you are buying new, most bike shops will do "bike fit" for free, to be sure that the bike is set up and adjusted just right for your body. When I started riding 2 years ago (first time since I was a kid), at least I was lucky that the bike I got via Cragslist for $120 was the right size for me.

But the fit was off. I learned about that on the internet, and did a lot of adjusting of the seat height, seat fore-aft distance, and even seat tilt. I still think the handlebars are too low for how I want to ride (sitting upright, not leaning forward), but they are maxed out on vertical adjustment.

Also, I did not like the handlebar grips, old style round knobby things. I got new ones, Ergon I think as pictured below. But most new higher-end bikes have grips more like below, not the round knobby things. Still, if grips do not feel comfortable, test out the fit and feel of some actual grips in bike stores and see what feels most comfortable for the price.



The last bit of gear that I got to address that (numb hands) were gloves with padding. Again, test fit the real thing in a store, if you buy mail order they may not end up fitting well.



If riding makes you feel uncomfortable on the seat after riding awhile, but it's not the bike seat itself, google "bike riding chamois". I rode for over half a year before I finally got some.
 

OverTheTop

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Not sure about in the USA, but in Oz you start getting reasonable bikes at about $500-800AUD. Spend about $1500 (little Oz dollars again) and it is almost a religious "hallelujah" moment when you jump on, with an increase in specifications, handling and fun factor. If you really get to like it you need to spend about $4k to get the next quantum leap (Carbon frame, tubeless tyres, lots of good stuff) and another "I wish I had done this years ago" moment. That's where I am at currently, with a Felt Team 6 Carbon hardtail.

If you like jumping around a bit and transitioning between grass, concrete, bitumen, be careful with the semi-slick tyres that are slick in the middle and treaded for banked turns. They can slip and get out from under you. I had a couple of falls and didn't like them at all. Full knobbies (2.35") for me now, even on the road for my commute. They are not quite as efficient as the slicks on the pavement. Haven't had a fall since. With my riding style I do tend to throw the bike around a little, including taking it onto skate parks for some jumping. I guess my earlier days of aerial ski jumping are trying to live on!

As George said, get a pair of gloves. My personal favourites are Pearl Izumi.
 

3stoogesrocketry

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I built this bike out of components from 5 seperate bikes . It is a single speed , and has a cruzing speed of 12mph. I try and do at least 12/15 miles per day weather depending. Total cost is around $75 for new tubes , chain and sprockets , headlight , and digital speedo / odometer .

Eric

temp_5.jpg
 

GuyNoir

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I ride a Trek 520 steel framed touring bike. Built like a tank and rides like your grandfather's 1970's era Caddy (i.e. living room comfortable). More $$ than you probably want to spend, but Trek's a fine brand and worth looking at.

I STRONGLY endorse George's comments on getting a good fit. My local bike shop has an excellent reputation for fittings and once they dialed in my Trek I can ride literally all day with no problem.

RE: hybrids, one of my riding buddies rides a Fuji hybrid, and while he's done some component swapping on it, it's carried him across Iowa 5 times with no problem.
 

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Peartree

Be cautious of the bike shops they can preach a good argument that you absolutely need the latest and greatest...........but you don't. I agree don't buy the Walmart junk, do one of two things buy a top name brand but used or go buy a new bike from Dicks Sporting goods, they have a house brand, I think it is called Diamond, that is good middle quality. The bike shop is a good place to learn, just can be very expensive.

Fit Critical, but does not have to be exact. Bike shops will sell you hard as George expressed about exact fit, but frankly you did not described long enough, routine rides for exact fit to come into play.

I'm gonna recommend you buy a mountain bike, fairly relaxed posture, and will go any of the places you described and then some, and trust me the tires will be fine on the pavement, again especially considering the riding you described.

Must have features:

Grips like George pictured

A soft seat, your butt will eventually fit the harder seat, but for what you described you need soft. Go only online buy a couple of gel seats that still have the slim profile (If you follow this advise, THIS WILL BE YOUR FAVORITE COMMENT) you and your butt will thank me.

Disc brakes, eliminates all the crazy adjusting, they work extremely well, and are also only found on mid range and higher end bikes, this one component will assure you are getting decent quality bike.

DONT buy rear suspension.

$300 per bike will buy you a couple of very nice bikes.



Now the rack, do NOT, I repeat, do NOT buy a rack from the bike store or even Dicks, you will pay hundreds of dollars for what you can buy for $50 in Walmart, especially if you have a hitch, and especially given that your only loading two bikes. I just saved you a ton of money............


My wife and I are right where you are, we bought good used bikes and a cheap rack, we take our bikes on about every vacation, especially to the beach, we ride around the neighborhood, and the local park. I mountain bike some, but not the wife, and we have ridden the Virginia Creeper Trail. You take a shuttle up and then you get 16 miles of improved trail in beautiful mountains all downhill.

Good luck, have fun.
 
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Zeus-cat

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Another option is to look for a bike club in your area. Maybe someone wants to get rid of a bike they no longer use. A guy I used to work with has seven Trek or equivalent bikes. I imagine he sells one once in a while and then gets a new one to replace it. If I remember correctly he has a bike path bike, a rain bike, a mountain bike... Also, might be a good place to get advice on where to shop.

We just got our bikes tuned up by a local guy that does bike repair out of his house. Maybe someone like that would also be a good place to look for a used bike that he has refurbished.
 

kclo4

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Couple things, bike fit IS very important. If a bike is uncomfortable to ride, you won't want to ride it. If one is willing to step up the price brackets into a good quality bike, it should fit. I mentioned that you can often get good deals on last years model which is awesome, but if they don't have the right size, skip the deal, it's not worth it.

Forgot to mention, if you have a Performance Bike in your area check them out. They sell mostly house brands and you can usually get more bang for your buck than the Trek, Specialized, Giant's, of the world. Not generally the greatest in customer service and such, but that's the tradeoff.

You don't need the latest and greatest tech, that's why last year model deals are great, but there is a reason why the latest is generally the greatest. The technology has gotten so good there almost isn't any bad bikes on the market once you get to the $1Kish range. That's why you really just need to ride as many styles of bikes and find out what is comfortable and feels the best. Stability and control are going to be important if riding on non-paved paths.

On the bike rack front, I completely disagree with the going cheap on a bike rack. Spending $50 to hang $2000 worth of bikes out the back doesn't seem worth it. It really depends on the model and style of the rack, but I want something durable and that does the least amount of damage to the bikes in transport. If you can afford it and are using a hitch, I would opt for a "tray" style rack that does not strap anything directly to the frame. Easy on and off, and no extra wear, and no bikes banging into each other down the road.


Peartree

Be cautious of the bike shops they can preach a good argument that you absolutely need the latest and greatest...........but you don't. I agree don't buy the Walmart junk, do one of two things buy a top name brand but used or go buy a new bike from Dicks Sporting goods, they have a house brand, I think it is called Diamond, that is good middle quality. The bike shop is a good place to learn, just can be very expensive.

Fit Critical, but does not have to be exact. Bike shops will sell you hard as George expressed about exact fit, but frankly you did not described long enough, routine rides for exact fit to come into play.

I'm gonna recommend you buy a mountain bike, fairly relaxed posture, and will go any of the places you described and then some, and trust me the tires will be fine on the pavement, again especially considering the riding you described.

Must have features:

Grips like George pictured

A soft seat, your butt will eventually fit the harder seat, but for what you described you need soft. Go only online buy a couple of gel seats that still have the slim profile (If you follow this advise, THIS WILL BE YOUR FAVORITE COMMENT) you and your butt will thank me.

Disc brakes, eliminates all the crazy adjusting, they work extremely well, and are also only found on mid range and higher end bikes, this one component will assure you are getting decent quality bike.

DONT buy rear suspension.

$300 per bike will buy you a couple of very nice bikes.



Now the rack, do NOT, I repeat, do NOT buy a rack from the bike store or even Dicks, you will pay hundreds of dollars for what you can buy for $50 in Walmart, especially if you have a hitch, and especially given that your only loading two bikes. I just saved you a ton of money............


My wife and I are right where you are, we bought good used bikes and a cheap rack, we take our bikes on about every vacation, especially to the beach, we ride around the neighborhood, and the local park. I mountain bike some, but not the wife, and we have ridden the Virginia Creeper Trail. You take a shuttle up and then you get 16 miles of improved trail in beautiful mountains all downhill.

Good luck, have fun.
 

Blackleaf99

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I would recommend spending some time reading the posted information at the Nashbar website.

https://www.nashbar.com/

They are an excellent reputable company and will put someone on the phone with you to answer questions. Read the product specifications, descriptions, sizing charts and especially the buyer's reviews if you are considering any items for sale.

Get onto their email list and you will find they frequently have very good sales and closeouts. The bike sales business is intensely competitive and this is good for the consumer.

From what you wrote in the OP, you probably need something with more durable tires than a road bike. The newer mountain bikes with suspension are surprisingly comfortable. Just my 2 cents.
 

OverTheTop

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As a few people have commented, suspension is great. Front suspension can take a lot of the jolts out of your arms and help the bike handle better. Rear suspension is normally only for downhill racing where it helps keep the rear on the ground and the weight penalty is not so bad (gravity works!).

If you want something to take the thump out of your butt have a look at the Cane Creek Thudbuster seatposts. A few years back I had a sore back and this made riding much more palatable. Don't need to use it any more nowadays, but it helped greatly at the time.
 

H_Rocket

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Another set of opinions

The bike you mentioned is what I would refer to an urban/commuter bike. Ideal for short (<15mi) rides. If you are looking for something to replace running I would look at the Trek FX series. Again you will pay a bit more than you probably want, however you will get what you pat for. I would suggest you look at the FX3 to FX6 as a good range. Below and you are cutting corners and above, you are paying for components you do not need. Also, for your wife ask about their WSD bikes. they are bikes with the geometry slightly adapted for women.

I disagree with one above poster about bike shops. Yes they will cost a bit more (they do not have the buying power to be able to shave prices). If you at all think you are serious about this then building a relation ship with a good shop and even more importantly a good mechanic is critical. Like any other store, go in and tell them what you want to spend. If you think they are up selling you wrong, find another shop.

A suggestion to look at if you are looking for comfort over performance, consider a nice bike by Raleigh - they have an impressive collection of "recreation bikes".

Also, understand this: a good bike requires maintenance. Either plan to learn how or expect to spend about $75-100 a year on each bike for service.

And last but not least - whatever you buy add in a helmet. If you are not planning on wearing one do us all a favor and just keep walking.
 

OverTheTop

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And last but not least - whatever you buy add in a helmet. If you are not planning on wearing one do us all a favor and just keep walking.
Definitely, and make sure it is adjusted correctly. I would be dead back in 2010 if it were not for a helmet. Hit head-on in a car park by a driver on the wrong side of the road. It is amazing the idiots they give car licenses to these days.
 

kclo4

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I think a hardtail mountain bike can do anything a commuter bike can do, but better, more stable, and be more versatile.

Also, WSD are worth looking at, but often times are not any better, or even different than "mens" bikes. Sometimes it's the same bike, with the same components, but just follows "shrink it and pink it." Sometimes they take the same geometry frames, and include a smaller size and change the touch points like the seat and handlebars. Sometimes they actually do make geometry changes by tending to shorten the top tube and sometimes increasing standover height. This sometimes works better for women with shorter torsos and longer legs proportionally, but that doesn't classify all women. So look at them, ride them, but by no means get hung up on having to get your wife a "womens" bike. I would argue that you should stay far far away from the classic drop bar style womens frame unless she is dead set on riding with a full length skirt, which would be silly.

Peartree, were you able to test out some more bikes this weekend?

Another set of opinions

The bike you mentioned is what I would refer to an urban/commuter bike. Ideal for short (<15mi) rides. If you are looking for something to replace running I would look at the Trek FX series. Again you will pay a bit more than you probably want, however you will get what you pat for. I would suggest you look at the FX3 to FX6 as a good range. Below and you are cutting corners and above, you are paying for components you do not need. Also, for your wife ask about their WSD bikes. they are bikes with the geometry slightly adapted for women.

I disagree with one above poster about bike shops. Yes they will cost a bit more (they do not have the buying power to be able to shave prices). If you at all think you are serious about this then building a relation ship with a good shop and even more importantly a good mechanic is critical. Like any other store, go in and tell them what you want to spend. If you think they are up selling you wrong, find another shop.

A suggestion to look at if you are looking for comfort over performance, consider a nice bike by Raleigh - they have an impressive collection of "recreation bikes".

Also, understand this: a good bike requires maintenance. Either plan to learn how or expect to spend about $75-100 a year on each bike for service.

And last but not least - whatever you buy add in a helmet. If you are not planning on wearing one do us all a favor and just keep walking.
 
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Peartree

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Thanks to everyone for all the advice and words of experience. I'm going to have to read it over a couple more time to digest it a bit and I'll try to get my wife to read over your comments as well.

Just so you know, we do have helmets. That's been a rule since long before we had kids. Now, especially since my wife is on horseback several days each week, we all have good helmets and they get replaced on a regular schedule, and that goes for both bike as well as equestrian helmets.

I also have gloves. I bought them when I was lifting weights in college, but quickly started wearing them when I rode my heavy-as-a-tank Schwinn road bike. I nearly cried when I had to get rid of that thing. I bought it used but still cranked out a lot of miles on it. My gloves are still in my closet in my "going to the gym" bag with my jump ropes, swim suits, water shoes, etc.

That old Schwinn, incidentally, is the only thing that makes me a little hesitant about a more "upright" stance, including a mountain bike configuration. Even though most of my riding has been on mountain bike style bikes for quite a few years, a part of me still thinks I ought to be hunched over the handlebars when I get going fast. :)
 

OverTheTop

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a part of me still thinks I ought to be hunched over the handlebars when I get going fast. :)
You can still tuck down when zinging along, it's just not compulsory the rest of the time :)
 

Zeus-cat

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And last but not least - whatever you buy add in a helmet. If you are not planning on wearing one do us all a favor and just keep walking.
Best comment in this thread! My wife and I have ridden for years and both of us have had the misfortune of crashing - hard. Helmets saved us both from any serious head injuries. Our crashes occurred on the same hill several years apart. We both hit debris on the road. As I was sliding down the hill on my back I remember thinking that asphalt is really hard. My shirt was shredded, but my back wasn't too bad.
 

kclo4

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If you like the road bike feel definitely ride some cyclocross or "gravel" bikes in your search. With some skill they can be used for light single track trail riding in addition to gravel gravel roads.

You could also try a "racey" mountain bike which tend to have low or negative rise stems if you like being low on the front.

My whole point is to spend some time riding different styles and price ranges and don't get stuck with a terrible "compromise" bike because of the description you give to the sale guy.

Thanks to everyone for all the advice and words of experience. I'm going to have to read it over a couple more time to digest it a bit and I'll try to get my wife to read over your comments as well.

Just so you know, we do have helmets. That's been a rule since long before we had kids. Now, especially since my wife is on horseback several days each week, we all have good helmets and they get replaced on a regular schedule, and that goes for both bike as well as equestrian helmets.

I also have gloves. I bought them when I was lifting weights in college, but quickly started wearing them when I rode my heavy-as-a-tank Schwinn road bike. I nearly cried when I had to get rid of that thing. I bought it used but still cranked out a lot of miles on it. My gloves are still in my closet in my "going to the gym" bag with my jump ropes, swim suits, water shoes, etc.

That old Schwinn, incidentally, is the only thing that makes me a little hesitant about a more "upright" stance, including a mountain bike configuration. Even though most of my riding has been on mountain bike style bikes for quite a few years, a part of me still thinks I ought to be hunched over the handlebars when I get going fast. :)
 

mkadams001

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Take a look at this site. https://www.rivbike.com Read the About sections and their articles. It is a lot of fun reading.

My advice is to shop a few bike shops and test ride. Set a budget. Buy the bike that fits and feels the best. That will be the one you want to ride and have fun riding.
 

cbrarick

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Not sure what the terrain is where you live, but the cross bike is the best if you have hills. Most hybrids start at many pounds heavier and go up. Probably not a problem in the dead flat states, but here in CT there's always another hill, and you'll get tired of the weight disadvantage soon.
When you get it you could get a "slick"tire versus knobbies that will come with it - any shop would be happy to do the swap when you get it.
Having a relationship with a bike shop is important - eventually you'll need service or a part and the mail order shops won't be there to help you. The good ones put on rides for all levels of riders, with the lower ones being supported by either a mechanic or a trusted stand in for the shop's mechanic (been there done that)...Also, in about 2 months or so you'd want to get the free tune up that came when you got the bike because they'll take the cable stretch out and your shifting will be pristine.
I've had disk bikes, both mechanical and hydraulic. They're cool, work a lot better in snow or heavy mud but that's not your goal. They are also a LOT harder to maintain, and are not generally considered user serviceable.
I'd nix any thoughts of suspension - weight you don't need, loss of energy from the suspension sucking it up, not to mention more things to go wrong. When I first started to ride cross I learned the invaluable lesson of getting off the seat for big bumps and also letting my elbows be loose - human suspension - because we routinely have courses that put you right over the curb...in both directions!

I'm a huge fan of the sella italia flite saddle, very narrow nose, ti rails. I don't get the gel option. it is on all 13 of my built bikes, though!

Have fun anyway!
 

OverTheTop

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Hmmm. Brakes. Almost as contentious as a glue thread :wink:. If you look at the performance of leather brake pads on the old rim brakes, they have the least difference in performance between wet and dry. Absolutely atrocious, but consistent, always :). The newer rim brake compounds are much better, but more change in performance between wet and dry.

I love disk brakes. Had them on the last two bikes and so far covered about 35000km. Maintenance is not significant IMHO (pad change and the occasional bleed) and the performance in wet or dry is really good. No brake fade when the rims get wet. No sand grinding away at the rims. They work with a slightly bent or warped rim, and even when you have electrical tape wrapped around the rim/tyre because of a split that has the tube trying to herniate. YMMV.

Front suspension is a funny thing too. You think it doesn't make much difference to ride quality when you go from fixed forks to suspension. Then you go back to a fixed fork and you realise how much it soaks up and what a more pleasant ride it is. I guess that depends somewhat on what your ride on and what tyres and pressures you run.

Ask around. See what suits you. As people have said, find a good bike shop. The guy I buy mine from is in bike sales because he is passionate about bikes, not because he wants to make a buck. If you find a bike shop with good service and advice, stay with them.

Here is a site with great technical information on all sorts of stuff. Not sure which brakes they recommend :wink:
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/
 

PatB

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I was thinking of what to recommend to you and forgot that I have a bike for sale that sounds like what you might be looking for. Seriously- I had it off the market during vacation and forgot to put it back for sale. It's a Trek Domane which is a racing bike with a more relaxed fit. So it's a "hybrid" in that sense. It was initially designed for cobbled street racing. Anyway, not trying to push this on you, but here's the details if you might be interested- https://www.ebay.com/itm/Trek-Doman...362959?hash=item3d4575f34f:g:GnMAAOSwE2tZclxA

I got the frame from my nephew who works at Trek, and the frame alone is worth more than the asking price. I'm replacing it with a mountain bike for myself.
 

Peartree

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I was thinking of what to recommend to you and forgot that I have a bike for sale that sounds like what you might be looking for. Seriously- I had it off the market during vacation and forgot to put it back for sale. It's a Trek Domane which is a racing bike with a more relaxed fit. So it's a "hybrid" in that sense. It was initially designed for cobbled street racing. Anyway, not trying to push this on you, but here's the details if you might be interested- https://www.ebay.com/itm/Trek-Doman...362959?hash=item3d4575f34f:g:GnMAAOSwE2tZclxA

I got the frame from my nephew who works at Trek, and the frame alone is worth more than the asking price. I'm replacing it with a mountain bike for myself.
It's lovely, and I'm sure an awesome ride, but WAY out of my price range at this point.
 

Kallahan11

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The differance between a 200 and 400 dollar bike is about the same as the difference between a 400 dollar and 1000 dollar bike. The walmart bikes (Or BSO's bike shaped objects) are build to be very profitable at that price point, everything is just junk. If you plan to ride less that 100 miles a year they are fine though.

Just for giggles heres a crazy man taking a walmart bike down a double black diamond downhill mtb course. [video=youtube;wkMnk_eCDQU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkMnk_eCDQU[/video]
 

Blackleaf99

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This has absolutely nothing to do with Peartree's OP. But each time I watch this video I feel myself grabbing the chair I am sitting in. There have been other taller bikes, but this guy rides without assistance. I do not know how he keeps his balance with his CM so far off the ground.

STOOPIDTALL - CICLAVIA 2013 - LA BIKE CULT

[video=youtube;bJXXckWLc0E]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJXXckWLc0E[/video]
 

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