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Beginner looking for resources on rocket physics, specifically rocket fins, and how they provide stability to the rocket.

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lgc98

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I am trying to find information for a research project, and I have found few resources on how rocket fin geometry affects the stability. I'm also interested on the size, shape, and other parameters of rocket fins and how they impact flight dynamics. If there are any books, journal articles, or reputable sources that can give me more about the theory background on rocket fins and stability, it would be much appreciated!
 

Joshua F Thomas

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Books:

The Handbook of Model Rocketry - covers all the basics

Modern High Power Rocketry 2
Model Rocket Design and Construction
 

XrayLizard

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Here is an opening statement of sorts (english comp me fail that unpossible ok)

In the early days it was argued than only 4 fins would work. 3 Fins would not.
Until a before-Musk engineer? mentioned...
Arrows made by Native Americans have 3 Feathers, and they work.
 

Switch

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I am trying to find information for a research project, and I have found few resources on how rocket fin geometry affects the stability. I'm also interested on the size, shape, and other parameters of rocket fins and how they impact flight dynamics. If there are any books, journal articles, or reputable sources that can give me more about the theory background on rocket fins and stability, it would be much appreciated!
You are actually asking a question with literally multiple facets:
1: The basic weather vane effect of the fins, which point the rocket into the wind.
The biggest "wind" coming from the opposite direction of the thrust - which is to say why fins help a rocket go in the opposite direction of thrust. Which is all about the center of pressure and center of gravity (mass) of the rocket:
2: Then there is the shape of the fin itself. Here is a good introduction:

I hope this helps. The key is finding the right technical terms to guide your search. And note that "drag" and the weight of the fins, is why real modern rockets use thrust vector control instead of fins.

So you may not find a lot of real "rocket science" on fins because they don't use them.
 
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