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Basic Range or flight Box

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CharlaineC

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A basic range box for those wondering. This is for a day of launching and is more then a simple range box. The simple range box items are marked with an *Motors are not listed but are needed.

1. A Sturdy case is a must (Extra large brief case, Tackle box, Tool box, ect.)
2. *Main Launch Controller (a controller that is able to launch your rockets)
3. Optional Secondary Launch controller (Estes electro beam) always keep a backup handy
4. *Container of Wadding (cellulose, Estes, tissue, ext)
5. Extra recovery equipment in assorted sizes. (Chutes, Streamers, shock cords, Tape disks)
6. Glue Applicators
7. Portable launch pad with Blast deflector
8. *Fine Steel wool
9. Disposable razor knife
10. Small scissors
11. *Batteries (fresh or fully recharged.)
12. Small box to hold igniters (with ignighters)
13. Optional Index Cards with information for your rockets
14. Optional Flight Log book
15. Collection of different grits of sandpaper
16. Masking Tape.
17. Optional Cluster Whips and rods
18. Optional but suggested Small disposable fire extinguisher
19. Watch
20. Optional Tracking equipment
21. Sun glasses
22. Emergency contact list with medication and allergy list.
23. Optional Soft and Stiff Bristled Brushes (for cleaning off dirt, dust and mud)
24. Talcum powder (to dust chutes and streamers)
25. Optional Pliers (needle nose and regular)
26. Emergency repair kit (launch lugs different sizes, thrust rings, screw eyes, shroud line, tooth picks, glue, ect)
27. Optional Camera with fresh batteries and film or cleared memory card.
28. A few plastic grocery bags or doggy do-do bags for trash
 
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Rocket Al

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I would add:

Scotch tape
Small bottle of thin CA
Small bottle of medium, gap filling CA
Syringe type 5 minute epoxy, or else
Small kit of 5 minute epoxy in bottles, along with some mixing cups.
Scotch-Brite pad and can of WD-40 ( for cleaning launch rods)
Emery boards
Kevlar thread and string
Roll of 1 and 2 inch warning tape rolls to use as streamers.
Spare parachute mylar, or envelope of pre-assembled chutes.
Clip board and club flight cards, pens
Suntan lotion
Baby wipes
Spring clothes pins
Small applicator sticks ( grab a handful of those coffee stirrers the next time you stop at Starbucks)
 

MarkII

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Wow, that is SOME LIST! Did you remember to include the kitchen sink? :D

I don't have a very extensive list of items stuff in my "range box." I try to keep things simple and streamlined. I have tried to prepare a "range box" in the past, only to realize after several launches that I had never opened the thing and used anything that was in it. I still bring it along with me, because you never know. But it remains unopened. Here's what I do instead:

What I Bring To A Launch:

Launch Equipment

-if I am launching locally, by myself:


  • my home-built all-purpose launch pad
  • my 12 volt launch controller (Aerotech Interlock), with clip extensions as needed*
  • my lightweight 12 volt battery (portable emergency car starter)
-if I am traveling to one of my club's launches, I leave the above home, because my club specifically requests that participants not bring their own launch equipment

Motors

  • my mini motors box
  • my standard and large motors box
These boxes are a medium and a medium-large tackle box. The medium-sized tackle box contains a selection of 13mm mini motors in their packs, as well as a small number of loose motors. The medium-large tackle box contains a selection of 18mm and 24mm motors in their packs or loose. There is a two-tiered tray in each box. The trays hold igniters and live motors that have come loose from their packages. In each box are also a few very small plastic boxed with colored snap lids. I keep my igniter plugs in them, and the color of the lid matches the color of the igniter. When I pack for a launch, I stock these boxes with motor packs selected from my main motor storage box, which stays at home. The boxes also contain assorted packs of recovery wadding.
  • a medium-sized plastic box with a snap lid containing RMS reloads and RMS motors (on the very rare occasions when I bring them)
  • a small plastic divided fishing box containing Micromaxx motors and igniters, when needed
Other Launch Supplies

  • a small plastic box containing:

  • a roll of regular masking tape
  • a roll of easy-release masking tape
  • a roll of Scotch tap
  • a roll of duct tape!
Rockets

  • in their own carrying cases, or carefully packed onto the back seat and floor of the car
  • the parachutes or streamers that are associated with these rockets, packed in their own zip-lock plastic bags and collectively kept in their own small plastic box
  • a small, travel-sized container of talcum powder - kept in the box with the chutes
Tools

  • 2 or 3 small pieces of fine-grit or extra-fine grit sandpaper - kept in the box with the tape
  • a small pocket knife (kept in my pocket)
  • 3 or 4 long bamboo skewers or small diameter dowels - 12" and 24" long
  • another small plastic box containing whatever hand tools that I think I will need. Usually I throw in:

  • needle-nose pliers
  • long thin needle nose pliers
  • regular pliers
  • wire cutter
  • 4" vise grips
  • several tweezers
  • a pick set
  • a small tack hammer
  • a small retractable snap-blade knife
  • a couple of spring-type wooden clothespins
  • 2 or 3 small plastic spring-loaded clamps
  • an 8" long fish hook extracter
  • (the contents are less elaborate if I am just going to my local field to launch)
  • a small plastic box containing all 3 common grades of CA
Personal Supplies

  • small first-aid kit
  • bug spray containing DEET
  • leather work gloves
  • pail or large coffee can for water
  • box of moist wipes
  • roll of paper towels
I keep the motor boxes and the tools in the trunk, along with the disassembled launch pad, if I am taking it. Everything else goes in the front and back seats and floor of the car.

(*I modified my Interlock Controller by cutting off the Interlock clip a little ways back from the clip, and terminating the double lead with two bullet connectors. I also installed bullet connectors onto the leads coming out of the Interlock clip. I constructed similar extensions that contained conventional micro-clips as well as several types of clip whips, all of which plug into the controller's leads with bullet connectors.)

Mark \\.
 

CharlaineC

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well thats a basic range bow the advanced one is much larger
 

MarkII

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well thats a basic range bow the advanced one is much larger
I was just teasing you; your list is quite good and very sensible. I may start cribbing from it. :D

Both you and I mentioned launch equipment in our lists, but I don't really see that equipment as being part of the range box contents. I see it as a separate category. As I mentioned in my post, my club specifically requests that participants not bring their own ground support gear to club launches (except by prior arrangement).

Your list also mentions more emergency repair supplies than mine does. I guess that I don't include as much of it because I am not usually at launches (or launching by myself) all day. I also usually bring much more than I can get to launch (some of it is just to show off ;) ). So if something were to break when I was at a club launch 2.5 hours away from home (which fortunately hasn't happened yet), I'll just put it back and launch something else. But that is just my particular situation; it doesn't call for as many field repairs, that's all.

I described my motor boxes; do you pack separate motor boxes for your motors?

Mark \\.
 

CharlaineC

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My range boox holds three lpr launch pads in one draw. and my main is carried in another contner. as for motor storage it all depends on how many flights i'm planing, the weather, and the number of motors i have at any given time. their have been a few ocaisions that i take my entire fleet (120+) out and launch them with the scouts and some of the neiborhood kids. for small amounts of motors i use a small locking container. other then that I use a converted wooden ammo box with a lock.
 

jflis

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Range boxes by Samsonite... :D

That's why I have 3 range boxes, I don't want a range suitcase...

Great lists so far. This will either excite or frighten the beginner, but not to worry. Start with the basics. As you fly more often you will discover what YOU need on the field based on how and what you fly and what you want to be able to do on the field.

For example, I never carried CA glue in my box as I never wanted to do field repairs. Now I do repairs all the time and carry a wide array of adhesives with me...

jim
 

gpoehlein

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I like the large tool box I found at Rural King - it has a removable tray and plenty of room for just about everything - including either of my launchers (Estes Bigfoot or Quest pad for mmx rockets). I don't keep motors there - they simply won't fit (I have become well known in my club as having more motors than a small hobby shop! ;)). But one of the users in the old TRF pointed us to the Stanley storage boxes at Lowes/Home Depot. These are perfect for holding motors as they are just the right depth for a motor to stand upright. Picture 1 is the label on one of my cases for reference. Picture 2 is box 1 (13mm and 18mm Estes) closed, while photo 3 is the box open showing the motors in place. Picture 4 is a close-up of a couple of the motor compartments - I have most compartments labeled (gotta label the rest and replace the labels that came off). Photo 5 is my 24mm and Quest motor case. If I'm only going to shoot a couple of rockets, I just use a small box with removable dividers that fits into my range box and put just the motors I'm gonna need in it.

motor1sm.jpg


motor2sm.jpg


motor3sm.jpg


motor4sm.jpg


motor5sm.jpg
 

Pippen

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Great lists so far. This will either excite or frighten the beginner, but not to worry. Start with the basics. As you fly more often you will discover what YOU need on the field based on how and what you fly and what you want to be able to do on the field.

jim
Jim, this is a really important point to make--what's being shown here is what people who have been in the hobby many years have accumulated and find useful. When you were a kid you probably stuffed a few engines into your pocket are you were good to go.

We went out on our first launch with a shoebox sized plastic box that held everything except the rockets and launch pad (the kids just carried those). I don't know the exact contents but it was probably along the lines of engines, sandpaper, masking tape, a sandwich bag with baby powder for parachutes, extra batteries and a needlenose pliers. Oh, and Spiderman band-aids--I just found them at the bottom. ;)

To this day we still use that same plastic shoebox with some extra supplies like duct tape and superglue added in. I put engines in a second shoe size plastic box and we carry the rockets in a big paint bucket I got in the paint department at Walmart. Engines are in ziplock bags labeled with the engine type and the rockets we use them for. If we need more engines we carry them in a cooler with a handle. If we're going to be walking far we load it into the old red wagon...which of course my older kids wouldn't be caught dead pulling, but it gets the job done.

This doesn't need to be expensive or complicated to start out.
 
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Handeman

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Very good lists. I'm not sure I can add much to them, I carry a combination of all the things on the various lists.
What I carry is very different now that I'm also flying MPR and HPR, then when I only flew LPR. Starting out, I only carried what I needed to fly LPR rockets, nothing for field repairs, just the basics, motors, wadding, igniters, an extra chute or two, masking tape for friction fitting motors, a pliers to get them back out of the rocket, and scotch tape for staging.

One thing I have found helps as you accumulate more "stuff" is don't try to put everything in one box or container. Unless you have a pickup truck with a cap, then you can put the one box on the tailgate and have access to everything. I have a car trunk to pack (it's a convertible so the trunk is a little smaller then most) so it's much easier and more efficient to pack everything in separate small containers. I can pack the trunk with many more items that way. I have a range box with tools and supplies, and BP motors. A small wooden box for RMS reloads, a small box for 29mm motor cases, another for 38mm cases, a cardboard box that gets loaded with chutes, a bag of dog barf, roll of paper towels, baby wipes, shopping bags for use as trash bags. A second box has the LPR rockets. This all goes in the trunk with two folding chairs and the folding table. There's still room to put the rocket stand for the HPR rockets, two large MPR rockets, a HPR rocket and most of my latest HPR.

Anything else goes in the back seat. Usually it's the gazebo, a cooler with water, sodas, and lunch, the rest of my latest HPR that won't fit in the truck, and any small last minute items that can sit on the floor in the back seat.

One suggestion that applies wither you're beginning or experienced: When you estimate how much water to bring along, double it. If it's a hot, humid summer day like we get here in Virginia, triple the amount of water you bring. In fact, on days like that, leave the soda at home an pack more water. A half a case of bottled water per person isn't too much on the hot days.
 

MysticalRockets

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All of those are examples of great range boxes.

But none of them are BASIC range boxes.

How about a basic one for a newbie, eh?
 

MysticalRockets

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Okay what would you put in it?
Cheers
fred
Calling me out again, Fred?

Ok, here goes. My newbie range box.
(Does not include engines, igniters, wadding, launch pads or controllers)

Uses: A cheapo Wal-Mart toolbox for 6 bucks.

Scotch tape
Needle-nose pliers
X-acto knife
Small pair of Scissors
2 parachutes (1-12 inch and 1-18 inch)
2 streamers
1 small bottle of epoxy, CA, and white glue
Several extra launch lugs
Small box of band aids
Small tub of baby powder
Small applicator sticks

Engines, wadding, igniters can all be stored in box as well.
 

Fred22

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Calling me out again, Fred?

Ok, here goes. My newbie range box.
(Does not include engines, igniters, wadding, launch pads or controllers)

Uses: A cheapo Wal-Mart toolbox for 6 bucks.

Scotch tape
Needle-nose pliers
X-acto knife
Small pair of Scissors
2 parachutes (1-12 inch and 1-18 inch)
2 streamers
1 small bottle of epoxy, CA, and white glue
Several extra launch lugs
Small box of band aids
Small tub of baby powder
Small applicator sticks

Engines, wadding, igniters can all be stored in box as well.
Not at all oh mystical one :) Notice the friendly tone complete with smileys :) How about extra batteries if you need them for an electron beam launching thing if you use one or whatever is apropriate for your system as well. The thing I like about your list is it's lack of expense. Anything that saves money is good :)
Cheers
fred
 

Handeman

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Calling me out again, Fred?

Ok, here goes. My newbie range box.
(Does not include engines, igniters, wadding, launch pads or controllers)

Uses: A cheapo Wal-Mart toolbox for 6 bucks.

Scotch tape
Needle-nose pliers
X-acto knife
Small pair of Scissors
2 parachutes (1-12 inch and 1-18 inch)
2 streamers
1 small bottle of epoxy, CA, and white glue
Several extra launch lugs
Small box of band aids
Small tub of baby powder
Small applicator sticks

Engines, wadding, igniters can all be stored in box as well.
Good list, but........

As a first time, newbie list, I would leave the launch lugs, glue and applicator sticks at home. If it breaks, take it home and fix it. Field repair takes a certain level of experience in my opinion. I think it would be better to get the experience at home in the shop then out in the field.

I would add a 1/2 or 3/4 inch roll of masking tape for friction fitting motors and a regular pliers to get those motors back out.

Other then that, looks like a great list to me.

That's just my 2 cents worth.
 

MarkII

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I described this in a thread in the previous incarnation of TRF. When I first began to fly rockets as a kid in the '60's, I used to take my rockets and launch equipment to our neighborhood launch field in SE Grand Rapids on the back of my Schwinn Varsity. I had put one of those aluminum clip racks on thr back of my bike, the kind that had a small flat platform and a big spring clip built in to it. I would slide the blast deflector off of my Electro Launch Pad, slide the pad under the clip with the launch rod fitting in between the two arms of the clip, and then slide the deflector back on.

I had loosened the joint in my launch rod just enough so that I could, with some effort, separate it into two pieces, so I would only have the lower half of the rod stuck on the pad. I would carry the upper half on my bike by attaching it to the top tube with rubber bands. Then I would slide my rockets (all two of them) onto the lower rod and pedal away with my friend to our field. I had a little leather seat bag in which I carried the rocket engines, igniters and wadding. That was it; no field box.

When I resumed flying rockets a few years ago, I used to carry almost everything in a small backpack. The pack has three compartments; I would put my disassembled Porta-Pad II and my Electron Beam launcher into the middle compartment, the box that my Alpha III starter set came in would go into the back compartment, and miscellaneous items would go in the front compartment. I would throw a couple packs of rocket engines and a pack of wadding into the box, a spare set of batteries into the middle compartment, and a pair of pliers (to help free stuck engines), a roll of masking tape, and a piece of sandpaper into the front compartment. After driving to the field, I would throw on the backpack, grab the launch rod and my rockets, and walk to the launch site. With the pack on my back, and carrying the rod in one hand and my rockets in a plastic box with a handle in the other, I could have looked like I was heading to the river to do a little fishing. That was rocket flying, ultralight syle, and sometimes I miss the simplicity of those days.

Mark \\.
 

Handeman

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That does bring back memories. I never had to take my bike to the launch site, we lived on a dead end street against a huge field. The wind usually blew from the house to the field so my Mom would let me park her car on the street to use the battery and I'd launch from the street. I do remember I usually brought everything up from the basement in one trip.

When I think back I can't believe she let me move the car to the street like that, I was in the sixth or seventh grade at the time.
 

MysticalRockets

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Not at all oh mystical one :) Notice the friendly tone complete with smileys :) How about extra batteries if you need them for an electron beam launching thing if you use one or whatever is apropriate for your system as well. The thing I like about your list is it's lack of expense. Anything that saves money is good :)
Cheers
fred
Grrr... forgot to put the batteries in there. I always have batteries in my range box.

Ugh. That's what I get for posting things fast.

And yes Fred, this is friendly. Otherwise I would have said it alot differently. :D
 

MysticalRockets

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Good list, but........

As a first time, newbie list, I would leave the launch lugs, glue and applicator sticks at home. If it breaks, take it home and fix it. Field repair takes a certain level of experience in my opinion. I think it would be better to get the experience at home in the shop then out in the field.

I would add a 1/2 or 3/4 inch roll of masking tape for friction fitting motors and a regular pliers to get those motors back out.

Other then that, looks like a great list to me.

That's just my 2 cents worth.
Well, that's what the scotch tape and needle nose pliers are for, but either works in a pinch.

And I included the launch lugs and such as a quick fix type of thing. Most people, IMHO, will try to do a quick field repair to get flying again.
 

Pippen

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In the interest of hopefully un-intimidating any new readers who may have choked at the expense, etc. of what's been shown, I hauled out enough of our stuff to take a few pictures. Again, I want to stress that this hobby can get expensive and complicated, but it doesn't have to be that way to learn and have fun.

Below you'll see a shot of the basics we take to the launch. We sometimes the 4-H launch equipment provided but if we don't, we pack the launch pad and controller in a bucket or wagon or someone just carries it!

Plastic shoebox #1
Engines in ziploc bags, labeled with the type of engine and the rockets we use them for

Plastic shoebox #2
Superglue
Tape (duct, masking, electrical--one kind would be sufficient)
Superglue
Sandpaper
Boxcutter
Baby powder/cornstarch (to help keep parachutes from sticking in humid weather)
Needlenose pliers (my husband's castoffs that the kids left in the backyard. Use to pull out stuck engines)
Sharpie marker
Tin with a few extra engine igniters and wadding (this comes with the engines so don't worry about it if you're going out the first time)
1 extra parachute, 1 extra streamer
Clip Whip wires (my son needed these for a rocket he built around his 6th year of building--won't be needed for single engine rockets)
Spiderman Band-aids
Curious George, suited up and waiting to occupy a payload :cool:

Bucket & Wagon
rockets, launch pad and controller if needed
Whatever is needed for the conditions--water, sunscreen, insect spray

Here's the pics. If you ever see a lady hauling a flower power wagon loaded with rocket stuff, that will be us. Be sure and give us a holler. :)

launchbox2.jpg


wagon2.jpg
 
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Micromeister

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From My earliest Mod-Roc days It seemed no matter what size or how many "range boxes" you have there are always something forgotten that really messes up a days flying.

One time I drove over an hour and a half to a launch sight only to realize I've forgotten the battery back at the house on charge:( Ok I'll just use the car battery... then noticed "where are the launch rods?" doh! that ended the day.

I think there's a need for an equipment check list, then you worry about the little stuff.
Charlaine, Mark and Pippens lists all work pretty well.
Being who I am I have check lists and specific boxes set up for different launch activities. Many have duplicate materials, that are frequently forgotten like wadding, masking tape and Quick fix field materials.

and always a notebook containing flight log and all those darn list LOL!!!!
Heres a couple of my "range boxes", motor boxes and well.... the ultimate range box, if I can't get what I need in this one....I shouldn't be flying it anyway ROTFL.

Rolling Build Box_12-25-05.JPG


Portable building kit-c-sm_2-pic pg_06-98.jpg
 

mjennings

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I'm shocked all this discussion of what should be in your range box but none of what should be on your rage box! Stickers! Especially rocket related ones!

:D

My box is a red tool box with a smaller tool box underneath the tray
contents from the bottom up. Items "*" are for solo flying and do not come to club launches

bottom
2 plastic containers
one with wadding,
one with igniters, and igniter plugs, (a travel soap container works very
well for this)
* 3 wire coat hanger halfs for staking the Estes launch pad to the ground
Small tool box
containing motors rubber banded together by designation and motor info

Tray
Baby powder
clip whips (a 2 leg and a 4 leg for clusters)
*blast deflector
*disassembled Porta Pad II
scotch tape
masking tape, (if I remembered to put it back in from the last round of painting)
scissors
knife
pencil/pen
Launch controller
batteries
safety key / rod cap

This has served me pretty well

other equipment that is hand carried
launch rod in a taped closed wrapping paper tube
a puzzle box that has parachutes streamers etc
Binder for recording flight info
and the rockets!
 

Pippen

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I'm shocked all this discussion of what should be in your range box but none of what should be on your rage box! Stickers! Especially rocket related ones!!
You know, even before you posted that I was thinking that Micro's rocket motor box would look even groovier with a flower power sticker on the lower left. :cool:

John, do you have a grill and cooler hidden away in there? As long as I'd be hauling all that stuff out of the house I'd want a good meal out of it. ;)
 

Mikus

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Great lists!

The only things I see missing are a hat for shading from the sun.

And a snake bite kit (I fly in Texas) for a really, really bad day out in the field. :eek:
 

Handeman

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snip.....
And I included the launch lugs and such as a quick fix type of thing. Most people, IMHO, will try to do a quick field repair to get flying again.
If they are driving a long way or going to an all day club launch, I completely agree. I was thinking of my first launches, my son and I, five minutes away at the school yard. On a good day we flew till we run out of motors, on a bad day we flew until all the rockets were lost or broken. We never fixed them at the field until we started making hour long trips to the club launches.
 

DaveCombs

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Sharpie marker
It took 23 POSTS to get this onto the list?

This is ESSENTIAL - especially if you catch a thermal and you want to some day get your rocket back. Take a moment to put your phone number on the nose cone shoulder or somewhere else. I have actually gotten one back as well as returned one to its owner this way.
 

MarkII

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All of those are examples of great range boxes.

But none of them are BASIC range boxes.

How about a basic one for a newbie, eh?
That WAS the short, simple list!

Oh, yeah. I forgot to add, under Personal Supplies:

  • Machete
  • Pistol with 6 rounds ammo

Sheesh! :D :p :D :p

Mark \\.

P. S. Now come on; obviously I'm kidding!!
 
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