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ColumbiaNX01

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I will be putting up a new shop on my property (back yard). I can legally build one up to 1000 sq ft. I am contemplating building it out of traditional lumber or steel building. If I build it out of traditional lumber I would build it myself, but leave the slab and electrical to the professionals. Doing it that route would be the cheapest for me. But then I have to paint the thing every few years. If I do a steel building I would hire the professionals to put it together for me along with the slab and electrical. The place that I would get the steel building has a 50 year warranty on rust. I would never have to paint the thing. After 50 years when the warranty is up I would be to old to care lol.

This would be a stand alone building. I would park my truck in it so I would have a large over head garage door. This would serve as a rocket/hobby/power tool sanctuary.

Any thoughts on the subject?
 
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TALON

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The slab (foundation) is very important! If you do it yourself, I would over design it. Electrical scares the **** out of me! If it was me, I would leave it to the pro's! I would rather spend extra $$$$ on the steel & have the pro's do it. Are you going to have a paint booth? And yes yesterday was a great day!
 

Steve Shannon

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I had Tuff Shed build me a backyard 16x30 shop. It came with a wood composite floor. I insulated it very well and wired it. In order to avoid problems I had it inspected. The inspector was great, making good suggestions which made me appreciate the process.
I did the drywall and now have a dedicated rocket shop.
 

ColumbiaNX01

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The slab (foundation) is very important! If you do it yourself, I would over design it. Electrical scares the **** out of me! If it was me, I would leave it to the pro's! I would rather spend extra $$$$ on the steel & have the pro's do it. Are you going to have a paint booth? And yes yesterday was a great day!
Yes it was a good day. Yes, regardless of a steel building or a lumber building I would have pros to the electrical. I dont know my much about concrete. I know if you do the concrete wrong there could be lots of long term issues. I like the idea of steel, building will go up faster than do it yourself.
 

tomsteve

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is vinyl siding and steel roof an option for the DIY?
 

ColumbiaNX01

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is vinyl siding and steel roof an option for the DIY?
IDK I live in an HOA. I have to do either use lumber building with asphalt shingles and brick exterior or steel building with colors similar to my house. dumb
 

bill2654

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Steel roofing is just as affordable as a shingle roof. When my roof needed replacing a few years ago, my roofer told me he could do metal for a tad more than asphalt shingles so I went with metal. Never need another roof. (at least not while I'm alive)
 

tmacklin

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I will be putting up a new shop on my property (back yard). I can legally build one up to 1000 sq ft. I am contemplating building it out of traditional lumber or steel building. If I build it out of traditional lumber I would build it myself, but leave the slab and electrical to the professionals. Doing it that route would be the cheapest for me. But then I have to paint the thing every few years. If I do a steel building I would hire the professionals to put it together for me along with the slab and electrical. The place that I would get the steel building has a 50 year warranty on rust. I would never have to paint the thing. After 50 years when the warranty is up I would be to old to care lol.

This would be a stand alone building. I would park my truck in it so I would have a large over head garage door. This would serve as a rocket/hobby/power tool sanctuary.

Any thoughts on the subject?
1,000 square feet would be a building 25' x 40' and would be a difficult and potentially dangerous task without a crew. There are many tasks that mandate at least two people to accomplish. If you are talking about a building half that size (say 20' x 25') or less and having 8' tall walls, that would be doable assuming both men had some construction experience and the required tools. The roof could be either metal or composition shingles, and the siding could also be metal or wood (plywood). Age and health also enter into the equation as does budget.

Good luck, have fun and be safe! :smile:
 

tomsteve

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IDK I live in an HOA. I have to do either use lumber building with asphalt shingles and brick exterior or steel building with colors similar to my house. dumb
I used to build houses and know a little of how crazy them HOA rules can be. built in one( prices starting a $499,000....a deal!!) that had a few weird rules: no fences, no cars allowed in driveway overnight, no baskeball nets attached to garage and if a portable one must be brought in at night, whenever a party, guests must park at the clubhouse, must have a house color and trim color approved by HOA,and the 2 that blew my mind: no bar-b-ques whatsoever allowed and homeowners must have a lawn care company do the lawn care and landscaping.
prolly had a rule sayin what way the TP could come off the roll,too.:eyeroll:

funny your HOA say that as steel buildings have a lot of lumber in them.
that's assuming youre referring to a pole barn type structure
 

ColumbiaNX01

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I used to build houses and know a little of how crazy them HOA rules can be. built in one( prices starting a $499,000....a deal!!) that had a few weird rules: no fences, no cars allowed in driveway overnight, no baskeball nets attached to garage and if a portable one must be brought in at night, whenever a party, guests must park at the clubhouse, must have a house color and trim color approved by HOA,and the 2 that blew my mind: no bar-b-ques whatsoever allowed and homeowners must have a lawn care company do the lawn care and landscaping.
prolly had a rule sayin what way the TP could come off the roll,too.:eyeroll:

funny your HOA say that as steel buildings have a lot of lumber in them.
that's assuming youre referring to a pole barn type structure
Yea no poll barns.
 

rharshberger

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Personally I prefer the conventional frame structure, over a steel frame building. I have owned both, the conventional framed was easier to heat and cool than the insulated steel building was. As for putting them up, framing is easier for me because I have been doing most of my life helping my dad build houses, steel buildings require a bit of specialized knowledge, especially when it comes to sheeting the exteriors and roof as there are tricks to working with sheetmetal, its doable but go with whichever you are more comfortable with.
 

djs

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Steel building I would think would be way too hot in the summer- unless you had windows to open and a few fans going? Wood would be a little more comfortable, if not as "strong" as steel.

If you plan on putting large tools out there, make sure your electrical service can handle the amps. You may have to upgrade the main box if this ties into it?
 

Steve Shannon

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Wood is R1 per inch. Metal is probably R0 per inch. Both would be hot but fiberglass batt insulation would work for both.
 

ColumbiaNX01

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Steel building I would think would be way too hot in the summer- unless you had windows to open and a few fans going? Wood would be a little more comfortable, if not as "strong" as steel.

If you plan on putting large tools out there, make sure your electrical service can handle the amps. You may have to upgrade the main box if this ties into it?
I would put a full HVAC system in.
 

boatgeek

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I would put a full HVAC system in.
If you're putting in HVAC, you're wasting money if you don't insulate, especially in OK. I'm partial to stuff that doesn't need maintenance, which is why the brick house has a metal roof.

Today was a great day too, marching with 50K of my nearest and dearest.
 

Steve Shannon

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If you're putting in HVAC, you're wasting money if you don't insulate, especially in OK. I'm partial to stuff that doesn't need maintenance, which is why the brick house has a metal roof.

Today was a great day too, marching with 50K of my nearest and dearest.
+1, insulation is the best return on energy investment you'll ever get.
 

Blackleaf99

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Wood versus steel: only one question. Do you have termites in your area ?
 

ColumbiaNX01

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If you're putting in HVAC, you're wasting money if you don't insulate, especially in OK. I'm partial to stuff that doesn't need maintenance, which is why the brick house has a metal roof.

Today was a great day too, marching with 50K of my nearest and dearest.
That is a dumb response. Why would I build a shop with lumber or steel and use it to park my truck in along with all my rocket/hobby stuff. That is stupid. When you put all that money to build a shop and your going to put 10,000 dollars of your tools along with rocket stuff along with a truck in there why would it not be 100% insulated. Hmmm.....

The question of the OP was not to see if I should insulate or not but to either build out of lumber or steel. I believe anything that you build and your going to spend any time in plus put your personal possessions should always be insulated. Yes truck and tools dont need to be in a insulated building but rocket stuff and paints, ect..... for longevity should be kept at a stable climate.

Who would want to build rockets in the summer or winter time in a shop in Oklahoma that is not heated and cooled????????????
 
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MikeyDSlagle

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You can go lumber with metal siding. Not conventional 2x4 frame. Use 4x6 or 6x6 posts; 2x6 purlins; you may have to go 2x8 for your rafters. Then wrap it with metal. That is a simple description of course. Lots more to it when you get down to it. Unless you have a good background in construction and some friends to help and proper tools and equipment, let the pros handle it. Especially one that size. They would know all the permits needed and would get that done too.

I'm in the market for a shop myself and still shopping around and weighing my options. Check out SteelMaster buildings. They do quanset type buildings. Lots of pros and cons... May be for you.

I would definitely opt for a separate meter for the shop.

Mikey D
 

FredA

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Definitely heat and insulate.
Otherwise you'll be fighting with condensation on your nice tools and they will rust.....at least that's what happens in this neck of the woods.
 

ColumbiaNX01

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You can go lumber with metal siding. Not conventional 2x4 frame. Use 4x6 or 6x6 posts; 2x6 purlins; you may have to go 2x8 for your rafters. Then wrap it with metal. That is a simple description of course. Lots more to it when you get down to it. Unless you have a good background in construction and some friends to help and proper tools and equipment, let the pros handle it. Especially one that size. They would know all the permits needed and would get that done too.

I'm in the market for a shop myself and still shopping around and weighing my options. Check out SteelMaster buildings. They do quanset type buildings. Lots of pros and cons... May be for you.

I would definitely opt for a separate meter for the shop.

Mikey D
Lucas Metal Works a large steel building manufacture. They are only 30 miles from me. The provide steel for people all over the country.
 

boatgeek

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That is a dumb response. Why would I build a shop with lumber or steel and use it to park my truck in along with all my rocket/hobby stuff. That is stupid. When you put all that money to build a shop and your going to put 10,000 dollars of your tools along with rocket stuff along with a truck in there why would it not be 100% insulated. Hmmm.....

The question of the OP was not to see if I should insulate or not but to either build out of lumber or steel. I believe anything that you build and your going to spend any time in plus put your personal possessions should always be insulated. Yes truck and tools dont need to be in a insulated building but rocket stuff and paints, ect..... for longevity should be kept at a stable climate.

Who would want to build rockets in the summer or winter time in a shop in Oklahoma that is not heated and cooled????????????
Honestly, your response (why wouldn't I insulate) was exactly what I was thinking. Insulation hadn't come up except in the post where you replied saying you were putting in an HVAC system, and you didn't mention anything in your response. So I probably should have assumed that you were planning on insulating, but we all know what happens when you assume. Plus, insulating was half of my response and a desire for low maintenance was the other. That was exactly the question you were asking in the OP.
 

JohnCoker

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If you pour a slab floor, put electrical boxes and conduit in it. A grid of 2x3 boxes will allow you to run tools like a table saw and run power to your work table without wires running across the floor.
 

FredA

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Putting electrical boxes into the floor sounds like trouble in a space where you might bring a wet/snow-covered truck...
Would really fear flooding.
 

Steve Shannon

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Putting electrical boxes into the floor sounds like trouble in a space where you might bring a wet/snow-covered truck...
Would really fear flooding.
When mounting an outlet in the floor there are special moisture resistant boxes and gfi outlets as required by code. There are even ones for outdoors.

Edit: forgot the link.
http://www.lewelectric.com/outdoors/

Steve Shannon
 
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TALON

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When mounting an outlet in the floor there are special moisture resistant boxes and gfi outlets as required by code. There are even ones for outdoors.

Edit: forgot the link.
http://www.lewelectric.com/outdoors/

Steve Shannon
I would have a dedicated bay for your truck that would have a slight slope to drain out under the garage door (like most home garages). Or have it slope to a drain. In either case, no floor outlets in this area.
 

FredA

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Those boxes are cool .... but....
Only if you remember to always unplug everything and close them.
Only if the seals remain intact - how waterproof are they going to be in 10 years????

Hanging cord retractable cord reels from the ceiling seems like a much more logical thing to do. IMO
 

ColumbiaNX01

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I would have a dedicated bay for your truck that would have a slight slope to drain out under the garage door (like most home garages). Or have it slope to a drain. In either case, no floor outlets in this area.
That is a great idea. If I build my maximum sq ft of 1000 I can have sectioned off area. A floor drain is a great idea. I could wash off tools or was the truck or rv inside.
 
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