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Hospital_Rocket

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Just to prove that all is not lost, I found this nugget on RMR

RRosenfeld of Aerotech

All current RMS assembly drawings from 18mm to 98mm and external dimensional
drawings are now available in the RESOURCES folder on Aerotech's website:

www.aerotech-rocketry.com

These should make it easier to verify motor mount sizes and clarify actual
part numbers and dimensions that are not in the assembly instructions.


Robert
 

n3tjm

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Yep... I downloaded a lot of them already. Whats interesting is they have one for all of their motors, and for all delay lengths...

Interesting.

The N4800 should have a cross section drawing showing the core geometry. I would love to see that...
 

DynaSoar

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Originally posted by Hospital_Rocket
Just to prove that all is not lost, I found this nugget on RMR
Ah, dimensions. Very helpful when trying to re-engineer an AT kit to handle motors other than what they intended.
 

Rocketjunkie

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Originally posted by n3tjm
The N4800 should have a cross section drawing showing the core geometry. I would love to see that...
It does show in general. Think of a body tube with 4 or 6 (can't tell from drawing) rectangular fins at one end. Use as core with propellant cast directly into the phenolic liner.
 

jetra2

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So, Tom, are you saying that there's a section on the N4800 that has a 'slotted' grain? Why?

Jason
 

Rocketjunkie

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Originally posted by jetra2
So, Tom, are you saying that there's a section on the N4800 that has a 'slotted' grain? Why?

Jason
This is known as a finocyl (fin on cylinder) grain.

It's a method of controlling surface area in a single piece, case bonded grain. The fins increase the initial burning area to compensate for the increasing burning area as a long core burner burns. An article on finocyl grain design is here:
https://www.seainc.com/papers/AIAA_1997-3340.pdf
 
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