Army SPEAR Team shot.

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CTI

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Gary Rosenfield from Aerotech just sent this to me.

https://fb.watch/6cYqEYfSg6/

“From what I understand, the Army SPEAR team reached 84 km (275,520 feet) according to inertial data using commercial high power motors: An AeroTech O5280X DMS in the booster and a CTI M2245 in the sustainer. Actual altitude may have been well over 300,000 feet, reaching and exceeding the Karman line. As far as I know this is a record with commercial certified high power motors.”

That’s pretty slick.

Anthony J. Cesaroni
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FredA

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Nice, but not straight up - was that a launch requirement?
 

MClark

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If the video on the linked page is the 84 km launch it is pretty far off vertical.
 

cwbullet

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Good we are still pushing the envelope.
 

jderimig

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Nice, but not straight up - was that a launch requirement?
If it was at WSMR they will allow ballistic return of the booster, maybe if that is opted for a launch angle may be required. I do not. John Demar would know.
 

3stoogesrocketry

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If it was at WSMR they will allow ballistic return of the booster, maybe if that is opted for a launch angle may be required. I do not. John Demar would know.

Judging by the sever tip off the rail in the smoke trail , that was not intended.
 

Chad

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man, given the acceleration, i can't believe it didn't buckle correcting that wobble off the pad. the picture of the airframe implies the minimalist of minimal build hah.

amazing stuff
 

UhClem

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Princeton Spaceshot used the same motors a couple of years ago. I can't turn up a final report with an altitude though.
 

Mike Haberer

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If the video on the linked page is the 84 km launch it is pretty far off vertical.
It's hard to tell because the videographer didn't do all that great a job, but that angle was at least 30 degrees off vertical. That translates to 317,000 feet if launched vertical (minimum).
 

mikec

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Princeton Spaceshot used the same motors a couple of years ago. I can't turn up a final report with an altitude though.
Which seems strange, given that they claimed that had exceeded the Karmen line on their Facebook page. But I didn't see a scrap of post-flight documentation on their website.
 

FredA

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But what glue -- we need another epoxy thread, don't we????
 

jsdemar

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This was a West Point cadet project. It would have gone higher if it hadn't tipped off the rail. Something around 4-5 degrees was required. No booster recovery, as planned. Ignition was likely done using my BKNO3-V... they bought a bunch of ProCast kits from Quickburst.
 
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