Are We Gaining Members?

Klatuso

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In your opinion, are we gaining members or losing already given members? From your anecdotal expriennce, is our forum gaining, losing, or maintaining steady? Is model rocketry losing to younger members entranced by drones?

I have my own opinions that drones are exponentially different than a rocket launch with flame and smoke and distance....and hoping it comes down safe. Drones, ugh. Throw it in the air, watch in slow motion and see where exactly you want it to go and then walk two feet to recover what? A plastic glob with a rechargeable battery. What son or daughter would be more interested? You or him/her?

Let's allow our kids to be interested in the uncertainty of launch and recovery. These kids will someday take us to other planets. Drone kids will take us closer to...leaves, house roofs, silly people waving hello?

I got a feeling I am preaching to the choir.
 
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markkoelsch

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I am not really concerned with this forum. I am more concerned with the overall participation within the hobby.

I would guess that the population/membership on NAR and Tripoli are relatively stable. They might grow a little and shrink a little. Assuming that is basically correct the next question, and important point is how much flying is happening? At we buying enough to keep our vendors and manufacturers healthy?

Another big thing is maintaining our flying fields. There are clubs that essentially do not exist due to a loss of a field.

Another thing is attracting and maintaining younger members. Case in point would be the local prefecture I fly with. The average age is increasing, and I really have not seen an influx of new people that equals the number of folks who have left the hobby. I understand it- heck, I have not had time to fly a rocket since last July. Life happens, people get older, and retrieving rockets and such can be challenging depending on where you fly.

I tried to get both of my kids involved. My nearly 15 year old son appreciates the amount of work it takes, but finds it boring. My daughter is 6, and is not interested at this point.

My point is that forums have come and gone. There was the old compuserve rocketry group- obvioisly not a thing anymore. Then there was Rocketry Online started by Darrell Mobley, which was sold to Extreme Rocketry Guys, then to Kevin Trojanowski, then as part of the sale of TRF, and then shutdown. Darrell Mobley struck again with Rocketry Planet in mid 2000’s. It was the best forum and news source the hobby has likely seen. I admit my bias as I was a moderator as were a couple other folks who frequent TRF. Darrell passed away and eventually we shut down RP. I am sure I am missing some.

Point is this- the forum is probably more a reflection of the health of the hobby than anything else.

Do not be surprised that if one day TRF is no more. As long as the hobby is healthy there will be someone/something to fill that function.


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blackjack2564

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Over the years I have flown with several clubs in various parts of the USA. [14 yrs]

Where as, you would show up to launch...have a hard time finding a parking space & find 30-50 sometimes 70 fliers attending.

Painfully & slowly over time......10-15 ,sometimes ,rarely 20 fliers & then majority over 50 yrs old [50-70]
Seems like the majority of fliers are B.A.R.S.
Yes some launches have a huge influx of high school/college age fliers, but that lasts as long as their project & then gone forever. This part concerns me. Rarely if ever do we get youngsters from these contests [TARC-SLI] joining or staying in the hobby/sport.

I [66] can't fly large rockets anymore, can't carry them or walk around in rough fields/terrain. I fear it's a dwindling sport/hobby.......hope I'm wrong.

The influx of population to so many rural area's, the political incorrectness of things that go bang [or are perceived so] & perception of legal issues,[possible lawsuits]has cut down on the willingness of landowners that allow us to fly.
Finally in general,the dumbing down of our youth today regarding tools, outdoor activities of any kind, & mental exercise requiring imagination & thinking without a personal "device" of some type.

When I was a kid, everyone played outside...all day after school & weekends till mom hollered"diner".
Baseball...Football sandlot games. Biking...building forts, treehouse, swimming hole or quarry.
Most of my friends knew how to shoot guns, change tires on a car & do simple things with tools at a very young age. We went camping, played minature golf, soapbox derby cars & Launched ROCKETS!
Model cars...planes...war ships...we built stuff and learned skills through hobbies that we needed as adults.

Guess times have changed, but are still the same.
Now youngsters live on video games, computers & personal devices. Meet & exchange ideas through social media.
Probably what they need for becoming adults in the near future.
 

James Duffy

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There is hard data that shows that NAR membership has grown ~20% over the past decade and a half, largely due to TARC. The earliest, oldest TARC participants are approaching BAR age.

The decline in activity on this forum can likely be attributed to a decline in use of all types of threaded forums, with platforms such as Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, and the like benefiting from this shift.

I'm a marketing stooge in real life (or, rather, I was). While there is a natural life cycle to any leisure activity, I sense that we are about to benefit from a new space race. This one will be between private companies, rather than countries, and will generate a great deal of interest in rocketry activity.

Also, consider this: among traditional craft hobbies, sport rocketry is the "last man standing" that has not experienced a significant shift to ready-to-use (or fly) products. Whether that is good or bad remains to be seen.

James
 

Peartree

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Totally anecdotal, but I spent all day Saturday at a gigantic train and toy show (350 vendors) and there was a lot of gray hair in that place. A lot of Grandparents with grandchildren, but a fair number of "younger" men approaching middle age. Model trains needn't worry about finding an big outdoor space, but it suffers from many of the same things rocketry has. Shrinking numbers of brick and mortar stores and declining interest from young people. At the same time, it pays to recognize that there is an age bracket where young people are focused on career and finding a suitable mate, than they are on hobbies of any sort as well as a time in their lives when there simply isn't a lot of disposable income. Large train layouts have long been the domain of retired guys with both time and money.
 

Klatuso

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I'm not sure "things that go bang" has as much a part to play as you say. Just my opinion. I think this hobby is much like myself (forgive my applying my own biases). I am 54 years old. My sister told me to get a hobby and I thought back...Where do I get this hobby? Oh, I flew rockets when I was young. I'll do that again.

Here is one single anecdotal story (that has no statistical reference), A young man only 10 years old wanted to see my rockets fly. I gave him the launch control and he lifted off the rocket and is hooked. We have children. Friends you fly with have children. Perhaps we need to let them build and launch more easy rockets?
 

Klatuso

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I don't think that "things that go bang" is the excuse. I would like to believe that rockets that go BANG are exponentionally different than guns that go bang and most children are aware of this. I think drones are the biggest drag on our forums and the demise of our NRA launches. That and an overall distrust in institutions. Why drive to Rio Rancho for an approved launch when I can try the same thing here or there?

I must say the last time I went to an ABQ launch I and my companions were welcomed, were explained what was happening and felt great even though we launched not a single rocket. But did we go back once I built my rockets? Nope. Why? Don't know other than I didn't feel like launching at a specific time and place even though I could witness other rockets.

Ouch. We are hurt.
 

Klatuso

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among traditional craft hobbies, sport rocketry is the "last man standing" that has not experienced a significant shift to ready-to-use (or fly) products.

Really?
 

neil_w

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I must say the last time I went to an ABQ launch I and my companions were welcomed, were explained what was happening and felt great even though we launched not a single rocket. But did we go back once I built my rockets? Nope. Why? Don't know other than I didn't feel like launching at a specific time and place even though I could witness other rockets.

I'm surprised by this, although, as in all things everyone has their own inclinations. Although launching on your own is great, for me club launches offer a few things that are irreplaceable:
1) See and talk to other rocket enthusiasts. I don't get that anywhere else (in person, that is; obviously get plenty of that in written form on this forum).
2) See other kinds of rockets and tech that I haven't seen or worked with before. I have zero interest in building HPR but I do enjoy seeing others' work and seeing them fly. I've seen gliders, air-starts, KeyECoyote's Turbo Vortico that really opened my eyes to the fun that saucers can be, and other stuff.
3) Launch higher, given larger launch field
4) Connect with folks that I've become friends with just from attending previous launches

Club launches were probably the missing link in my first go-round with this hobby. Lacking a good launch field nearby, I hardly ever launched anything. I mostly built shelf queens.
 

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Our school's rocket club has been going for eighteen years. We typically have 25-30 members each year out of about 130 students (K-8) at the school. This year I have 34, with fourteen of them girls. It is a very small sample, but in our neck of the woods rocketry is still going strong.
 

liv3mind

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Im not sure but i can give my input, i was never into rockets as a kid, i built some in cub scouts, but i was always into rc cars, and more recently into quad rotors, i just recently got interested in rocketry, and now my kids are ecstatic about it. Im 32. The local launches here seem to have a good turnout of all ages, i am going to be attending my first hpr meet in a couple weeks so i cant comment on the turnout there. I will say i think interests wax and wane in hobbies throughout life for me. There is an overall trend in parents my age that i know personally that does not foster interest in hobbies like rc, drones, rockets, or models, but im not sure if that’s widespread or not.

Fwiw i still do rc and drones, i just added rocketry to the list.
 

Exactimator

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Im not sure but i can give my input, i was never into rockets as a kid, i built some in cub scouts, but i was always into rc cars, and more recently into quad rotors, i just recently got interested in rocketry, and now my kids are ecstatic about it. Im 32. The local launches here seem to have a good turnout of all ages, i am going to be attending my first hpr meet in a couple weeks so i cant comment on the turnout there. I will say i think interests wax and wane in hobbies throughout life for me. There is an overall trend in parents my age that i know personally that does not foster interest in hobbies like rc, drones, rockets, or models, but im not sure if that’s widespread or not.

Fwiw i still do rc and drones, i just added rocketry to the list.

Hey, you’re not even a BAR. You’re brand new!

Would you mind if I ask you a few questions so we may gain some insight to sustain and grow our little hobby? This thread may be recorded for quality control purposes.

What got you interested in rocketry?
How did you find your local club?
How did you learn about HPR?
Can you explain what you called the overall trend in parents your age that doesn’t foster interest in hobbies?
 

liv3mind

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Hey, you’re not even a BAR. You’re brand new!

Would you mind if I ask you a few questions so we may gain some insight to sustain and grow our little hobby? This thread may be recorded for quality control purposes.

What got you interested in rocketry?
How did you find your local club?
How did you learn about HPR?
Can you explain what you called the overall trend in parents your age that doesn’t foster interest in hobbies?

Yes i am brand new to the forums, i can certainly try to answer them

What got you interested in rocketry?
- A few months ago i was browsing youtube and a Level 1 attempt video popped up on my suggested list (probably due to watching drone videos, connected by flight or whatever who knows how the interwebs work). I watched it; I remember saying it was "freaking rad" and even showed my wife. The kids happened to be in the room and went nuts. I didn't forget about it, but i did not pursue it at all. A week or so later, we were in Hobby Lobby and i was in the model area looking for Softball display cases to turn into enclosures for a couple of my tarantulas and i wandered down the Rocket isle, I immediately got excited about that video again and walked out of the store with no display cases but i had a Big Bertha and a Tandem-X launch set for my boys, we built them the same day. We were STOKED, even my wife was interested. Being a semi responsible adult in Southern California i didn't want to just launch anywhere because of fire danger, so i took to google. Only to find out the law is not always clear. I was not comfortable finding a park/field to launch because of potential fines from law enforcement. I called fire department but could not get a straight answer. The two emotions i personally felt were sadness due to feeling like we build them for nothing, and anger for wasting the money. After a bit my wife suggested that we drive out to the desert and launch them, we planned a family trip for the following weekend, during the week doing more googling, it seemed like that was a pretty gray area as well. That leads me to the next question.

How did you find your local club?
-I finally just googled "San Diego Rocketry" and D.A.R.T was the first link that popped up. We attended a launch in lieu of our desert trip. I will say that the websites of a lot of the clubs seem pretty dated and could use some freshening up. But they get the job done. During my googling i read quite a few threads about legalities and builds here on TRF. I found the Tripoli Prefect in my area the same way as above. Google. At our first launch we had a BLAST, the club members were extremely patient and helpful. There were some scout groups and at least one school group there. It must have been like herding cats and the people running the event were great. My kids only launched 2 times each but left wanting to go home and launch their rockets more! They talk about it daily now and are helping me with my L-1 build (sanding, stirring etc).

How did you learn about HPR?
-The D.A.R.T launches are about an hour away from us if there is no traffic, they have a 1k ft waiver. My 8 year old built the Crossfire and my 6 year old build the Amazon. At this launch site the crossfire can use B6 motors and the Amazon can use C6. Naturally my 8 year old wants to use the c6 motors, so we found the Tripoli Prefect. By this time we had build a Baby Bertha, a Goblin, and my wife had decided she wanted a Glitter Pink V-2. My brother even jumped on board and ordered a Big Daddy. The Tripoli Prefect is in El Centro, about 3 hrs away for us, not too bad, but i didn't want to drive all the way out there just to launch a Goblin and a Crossfire ;) so i started researching L-1 builds (that was after all what grabbed my attention in the first place. I finally got mine ordered and started putting it together over the weekend. We are going down to the next launch to fly our smaller rockets in april, i hope to have my L-1 ready for may (if its not too hot). Because my kids are helping with the build its a family event, even my brother and parents are considering attending when i fly it.

Can you explain what you called the overall trend in parents your age that doesn’t foster interest in hobbies?
-Well this is a easy one and a tough one, the tough part is short; in my age group and in my area it seems like there is less and less "hands on" parenting as far as activities/hobbies go. My wife an i like to do all our hobbies as a family as much as possible, so if i get rc cars, the kids get to build some, they play hockey so i coach. It seems its much easier for kids to be kept busy with a phone, tablet or tv. It seems in order for there to be a hobby that takes off, there needs to be a Youtube channel(s) that really grab the attention. The other issues is that because we live in a very digital age which breeds instant gratification, i wont get into it too much, because its a slippery discussion in its self. But hobbies that require building and planning do not give instant gratification. This seems to be a generational thing to me, i am plenty guilty of it in many regards, somehow it did not effect my hobbies

All in all, i hope to be involved in rocketry and keep my kids interested for years to come, the science behind it is very intriguing. I do not intend to get certified and bail. If i can instill the desire to learn about science in any way to my kids i will. Currently my 6 year old plans to go to space, and my 8 year old wants to be a paleontologist. Rocketry as a hobby seems to bring the ooohs and ahhhs for them as well as me.

I wonder how many people buy a rocket kit then find that they cant use it in their yard or park and it ends there? I dont mind driving the family to a launch but maybe Not everyone will want to drive 3+ hrs for one? Or even an hr?

i may have more to add when i get home from work, not sure
 

Exactimator

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Yes i am brand new to the forums

B.A.R.: Born Again Rocketeer. You'll see that term around. A lot of us did this as kids and then get back into it as adults. I'm always surprised when an adult rocketeer isn't a BAR. You're new to the hobby.

A week or so later, we were in Hobby Lobby and i was in the model area looking for Softball display cases to turn into enclosures for a couple of my tarantulas and i wandered down the Rocket isle, I immediately got excited about that video again and walked out of the store with no display cases but i had a Big Bertha and a Tandem-X launch set for my boys, we built them the same day. We were STOKED, even my wife was interested.

Chalk one up for the brick and mortar hobby shop. I've been under the assumption that younger people were all online now (which tracks with your YouTube experience) but it turns out a hobby shop actually played a part in this case. I stand corrected.

Thanks for the kind words about the launch experience.

When you go out to Holtville for the HPR launch you'll find the typical crowd of 15-20 white guys over 40. I think the most diversity we have is a couple women. The group is growing, and we're getting more younger guys coming out and getting their L1 certs too. Some come from the DART launches since it's a natural gateway. Others find their way there without DART. Hopefully your brother and wife get certified too.
 

Klatuso

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I hope you are right. But let's get back to what I asked. Are we losing or gaining members to this forum? Pehaps a moderator or
the person in charge might say something. Do you really know who or he or she is???? Do you my members even know who owns this website?
 

liv3mind

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B.A.R.: Born Again Rocketeer. You'll see that term around. A lot of us did this as kids and then get back into it as adults. I'm always surprised when an adult rocketeer isn't a BAR. You're new to the hobby.



Chalk one up for the brick and mortar hobby shop. I've been under the assumption that younger people were all online now (which tracks with your YouTube experience) but it turns out a hobby shop actually played a part in this case. I stand corrected.

Thanks for the kind words about the launch experience. That was John, Chris, Dave and myself (and possibly Mike) running the launch. In fact, I think I know who you are. Did your wife have a baby in a harness on the front of her at a recent launch? And did you have a small black drone you got up really high?

When you go out to Holtville for the HPR launch you'll find the typical crowd of 15-20 white guys over 40. I think the most diversity we have is a couple women. The group is growing, and we're getting more younger guys coming out and getting their L1 certs too. Some come from the DART launches since it's a natural gateway. Others find there way there without DART. Hopefully your brother and wife get certified too.

Yep that was us. Myself, 6 year old, 8 year old, and wife with our 5 month old strapped to her, and my brother. Good memory! And all 5 of us are planning to come camp friday night and be there for Saturday portion of the Holtville launch (6th and 7th) unfortunately we cant stay for sunday this time (hopefully having a baby out there wont be a bother to anyone he doesn’t fuss much). I will be bringing my L1 build with me to get some more opinions and information before i button everything up, I’m hoping to make a cert attempt in May; i have a build thread going on here as well. My brother will for sure come out for the cert attempt but work keeps him pretty slammed.

Like i said i built a couple rockets in cub scouts, but i never had an interest till now, in-fact as a kid for the merit badge i remember feeling a little like it was a chore to do; if that qualifies as new i will take it :).

I apologize, i remember all the faces but i couldn’t put names to you all. It was however a-lot of fun, we are coming this Saturday again to D.A.R.T. With my mother in law.
 

liv3mind

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I hope you are right. But let's get back to what I asked. Are we losing or gaining members to this forum? Pehaps a moderator or
the person in charge might say something. Do you really know who or he or she is???? Do you my members even know who owns this website?

I think member retention in a forum is a valid concern, but a hard one to tackle even for a mod or owner I would assume. Do we count lurkers as members even though they never join/post? The people who just browse for info? Im sure a huge portion of members joined to ask 1-2 questions and never say anything again as well. A couple other forums i am part of seem to have a lot of people who show up for a month-year and are active than never post again. Sometimes they lose interest and are vocal about it, sometimes someone is toxic towards them, or they just disappear.
 

blackjack2564

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I hope you are right. But let's get back to what I asked. Are we losing or gaining members to this forum?


I've been around long enough on this & a few other now defunct Forums to add my point of view.

It's an evolving thing. We are constantly in flux.
We have lost many old time members over the years & gained many more younger ones.
Seems like the average life expectancy of a Rocketeer/Forum member is around 3-5yrs.
They go through the Cert process [L-1 through 3] then lose interest. Seems that after attaining L-3, many feel there is nothing more to do and are gone.

Then there are folks that have been bitten at various ages & are in for the long haul, finding their niche in the hobby, being modeling...sport flying...extreme projects...research motors.....gliders..... odd rocs..etc

There are endless possibilities for those wishing to expand the experience.
Then the one with the attitude that credit cards & cash can buy them through the journey & get burned out quick.

There is a core group of contributors that post regularly over the years and help folks along the journey.

Many have fallen away due to marriage, babies, kids in college [cost of raising them] loss of flying fields and clubs closing down.
As you have found, it's not easy to just build and go fly a rocket. Much equipment is needed, rules must be followed, waiver established, open land to fly on becomes harder & harder to get.

So we constantly lose some and gain new ones. If you remain here about a year or so, you can tell who comes....goes...and has been here a long time.
Looking at the join dates in upper right hand corner is a good clue. Post counts can give some indication, but many read but rarely post.

We have far fewer ...what I call "serious projects" than we used to & it seems far too much arguing and condescending attitudes that have driven many away.

Overall there are about 10-12,000 members of both groups NAR & TRA, but in reality probably half that who are actually active fliers.
High school/college teams account for a fair number, but they come & go in 2-4 year cycles and are gone,never to be heard from again, after the projects/competitions are complete.
We had over 500 kids in rockets for schools flying their competitions for many years at our club, not 1 ever became a member when school was over.

This Forum was started by an active flier who single handed ran it. That is a HUGE burden. It was sold several years ago to a group who owns many Forums of all types for monetary [profit reasons]
They are not rocket folks at all. I think I read they own over 60 Forums. They are business folks.
I am not passing judgement of any type, just stating some facts as I know them.
 

samb

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In your opinion, are we gaining members or losing already given members?

Not sure what "losing already given members" means.

From your anecdotal expriennce, is our forum gaining, losing, or maintaining steady?

Very anecdotally, maintaining steady.

Is model rocketry losing to younger members entranced by drones?

Not a clue but is it wrong to admit this older member is entranced by drones.

... Pehaps a moderator or the person in charge might say something. Do you really know who or he or she is???? Do you my members even know who owns this website?


Not sure where you're going with this. Blackjack has the right answer I think; people come, people go, seasons change, stuff happens.

I think this is still the outfit that owns TRF: https://www.groupbuilder.com/

Someone with the TRF handle Admin has represented himself as the owner. He doesn't post here very often. Here is one of his most recent (from 2017): https://www.rocketryforum.com/showthread.php?141510-Who-is-Carbon-Media-Group&p=1710722#post1710722


Angie is the TRF handle of the admin who is the most active and helpful here. Hope this helps
 

Bat-mite

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My story: saw a model rocket launched as a kid, never did it myself. Wanted to.

Grew up, had kids of my own, finally bought a launch set. Started launching at school fields, got tired of losing rockets.

Met someone who said, you should join the NAR and fly with a club. Joined local club NARHAMS.

Discovered that you could "certify" and fly really big rockets. Sounded like a challenge.

Joined MDRA and got L1, then L2, then L3.

My kids still love it, especially when they get to ride in Mr. Tom's truck to the away cells. They launch LPR, but are still too young to build their own.
 

Exactimator

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I hope you are right. But let's get back to what I asked. Are we losing or gaining members to this forum? Pehaps a moderator or
the person in charge might say something. Do you really know who or he or she is???? Do you my members even know who owns this website?

It slows down and picks up again. It seems to generally hold steady. In the five years I’ve been here there’s been at least a dozen threads about the imminent death of this forum. There’s also been at least that many about the imminent death of the hobby itself (and Estes, CTI, etc). Five years later and TRF is still here. So is the hobby. Facebook has syphoned off some activity (IMHO it’s much easier to post pics there) but there’s a ton of information here and it’s not going to go away any time soon.

ETA: At the bottom of the home page is a little blurb of forum statistics. Under the QUICK LINKS tab you can view the forum leaders, including the admins.
 

markkoelsch

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There is hard data that shows that NAR membership has grown ~20% over the past decade and a half, largely due to TARC. The earliest, oldest TARC participants are approaching BAR age.

The decline in activity on this forum can likely be attributed to a decline in use of all types of threaded forums, with platforms such as Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, and the like benefiting from this shift.

I'm a marketing stooge in real life (or, rather, I was). While there is a natural life cycle to any leisure activity, I sense that we are about to benefit from a new space race. This one will be between private companies, rather than countries, and will generate a great deal of interest in rocketry activity.

Also, consider this: among traditional craft hobbies, sport rocketry is the "last man standing" that has not experienced a significant shift to ready-to-use (or fly) products. Whether that is good or bad remains to be seen.

James

James, do stats exist showing how many of the TARC folks remain in the hobby for longer than the projects term?


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mikec

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There is hard data that shows that NAR membership has grown ~20% over the past decade and a half, largely due to TARC.
There's certainly evidence that NAR membership has grown (see https://www.nar.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/State-of-the-NAR-February-2016.pdf page 5) but I'm skeptical that it has a lot to do with TARC. In my experience students don't join NAR when they are participating in TARC, and I don't think I've ever met anyone who was in TARC and stayed active afterwards. But I'm curious to hear what others have to say.
 

neil_w

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I don't think I've ever met anyone who was in TARC and stayed active afterwards.
This is an interesting question. I have two thoughts on this:
1) They are primed to become BARs later in life. I think in general that high school and/or college are pretty common times to give up the hobby for a while, only for some to return later.
2) Participating in TARC is a *very* different experience from building and flying rockets non-competitively as a hobby. I wonder which is more likely to "stick".

In any case, it'll be a good issue for the next owners of Estes to tackle. How do they increase visibility of and participation in the hobby?
 

Eljay

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re: the BAR experience - there's a few variations, mine was thinking about what I enjoyed doing as a kid and trying to replicate those experiences for my kids. With the TARC folks since they're older I'm not sure there's that same association but who knows. They seem to be enjoying themselves, anyway.

re: drones... I fly drones. It's fun and it's a useful photography tool. The kids enjoy racing against them, etc. I don't really see that as an either/or with rocketry.
 

James Duffy

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James, do stats exist showing how many of the TARC folks remain in the hobby for longer than the projects term?[/url]

I'm sure that this data does not exist. However, if it did we could make a reasonable guess that 99.9% of the teenage TARC/NAR members will not maintain the membership beyond their participation in the TARC program.

Well, why not? The same reasons that most of us quit flying rockets around that stage of life. Your early 20s don't allow for a great deal of hobby time, and any leisure time and money tends to get expended on the pursuit of the opposite sex. And that's fine.

The typical BAR rejoins the hobby when they have a family of their own. The next few years should prove to be very interesting, as many early TARC participants have now started families of their own.

Also: note that much of the NAR membership growth attributable to TARC is due to teachers joining, not students. These memberships are probably "stickier," to use a marketing phrase.

James
 
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