Anyone watching the Stanley Cup?

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

Donnager

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
1,342
Reaction score
1,126
Watched game 5 (and bits and pieces of the previous games/matches). Not a big hockey fan, but can't not root for Florida.

Edmonton seems to play a little more precisely.
 
There's two of them as far as I know. Florida Panthers and Tampa Bay Lightning.

Tampa bay has had a few Stanley Cups, 3 I think. This year would be the first for the FL Panthers.....If they can get by Edmonton, and I'm not sure.
 
I'm not really a fan of either team, but I'm at least glad it wasn't a 4 game sweep and Edmonton is at least trying to make a series of it.
 
Nobody except the Oilers thought that they were going to win Game 5 in Florida. I can't bring myself to root for them... they beat the Kings in Round 1, after all, but at some point in his career I'm sure Connor McDavid will win a Cup. Florida has never won one... which actually gives them the "underdog" label, although they had the better record in the regular season. It is annoying that way that the announcers coo over Edmonton, they're not exactly impartial.
 
I am Canadian and live in Canada. It is impossible to avoid here.
And there are lots of Canadians on the Edmonton team, 16 compared to a mere 13 on Florida :D
Edmonton did not play well in the first 3 games and looked like losing the sweep was possible. But they have played well the last 2 games to force an upcoming game 6 in Edmonton. That should be a real barn burner, as will a potential final game 7 in Florida.
Fun stuff.
 
I am Canadian and live in Canada. It is impossible to avoid here.
And there are lots of Canadians on the Edmonton team, 16 compared to a mere 13 on Florida :D
Edmonton did not play well in the first 3 games and looked like losing the sweep was possible. But they have played well the last 2 games to force an upcoming game 6 in Edmonton. That should be a real barn burner, as will a potential final game 7 in Florida.
Fun stuff.
I think Edmonton will likely win their home game.

Their coach has been adjusting to FL. I'd be surprised if it doesn't go to 7 games.
 
Personally, I think playoff hockey games are some of the most entertaining games of any sport to watch. The playoffs are grinding, and these guys are exhausted by this time of the year, yet they still drag themselves out for game after game. You don't get to the finals on luck, as you can in single elimination formats like football. And the rules aren't overly complicated like football can be at times.

Some of the other traditions are really good too. Watching the handshake line after a series ends there seems to be genuine respect for each other by both teams. And other sports don't have anything like the winners skating around with the Stanley Cup passing it from player to player.
 
This is it! A huge do or die game for Edmonton tonight! I really think they can do it, home ice advantage will help.
25 degress (80 F) forecast for Edmonton with possible showers so the crowd shouldn't be cowering in the heat wave affecting much of the rest of the country (it was 31 here on the Atlantic coast yesterday).
 
The playoffs are grinding, and these guys are exhausted by this time of the year, yet they still drag themselves out for game after game.

I think this is a problem the NHL needs to think about solving. Playing an 82 game regular season and then a potential 28 more games in the playoffs (if you win the Cup and all your rounds go to 7 games) means that the regular season is just kind of a pre-season session now. Playing a potential 110 games in a year is almost inhumanly possible. MLB does have more games in a season, but baseball is not hockey. Not taking anything away from baseball, but the players on a baseball team spend about 80% of a game standing around or sitting on the bench with brief spurts of extreme athleticism. Hockey players are literally getting bashed repeatedly every other minute or so by guys moving at very high speed and, these days, the average height and weight of an NHL player is 6'2", 200 lbs.

This has incentivized more and more hockey players at younger ages to have insane yearly schedules. Although I never played in the NHL, I did play Division 1 hockey and did play some minor league pro hockey in my youth. That was a long time ago (1980's and a bit in the 90's). My son turned 16 recently and he is playing AA and AAA hockey. He ended up playing 85 games last season and our travel radius was well over 1000 miles. I very much do not want this kind of schedule for my son, but, if you want to be even vaguely competitive in the sport now, you need to push young tweens and teens into these insane schedules. On his AAA team last year, 7 kids sustained career ending injuries last year (3 catastrophic concussions, 2 blown out knees, 1 arm/shoulder injury and 1 broken pelvis). They were all quickly replaced with kids waiting in the queue to take their place.

I get the NHL wants to maximize profits and I LOVE watching hockey! I just think the NHL/DIV 1 system in hockey has gone beyond what is right. It will never feel "normal" to be watching the Stanley Cup in June...
 
I think this is a problem the NHL needs to think about solving. Playing an 82 game regular season and then a potential 28 more games in the playoffs (if you win the Cup and all your rounds go to 7 games) means that the regular season is just kind of a pre-season session now. Playing a potential 110 games in a year is almost inhumanly possible. MLB does have more games in a season, but baseball is not hockey. Not taking anything away from baseball, but the players on a baseball team spend about 80% of a game standing around or sitting on the bench with brief spurts of extreme athleticism. Hockey players are literally getting bashed repeatedly every other minute or so by guys moving at very high speed and, these days, the average height and weight of an NHL player is 6'2", 200 lbs.

This has incentivized more and more hockey players at younger ages to have insane yearly schedules. Although I never played in the NHL, I did play Division 1 hockey and did play some minor league pro hockey in my youth. That was a long time ago (1980's and a bit in the 90's). My son turned 16 recently and he is playing AA and AAA hockey. He ended up playing 85 games last season and our travel radius was well over 1000 miles. I very much do not want this kind of schedule for my son, but, if you want to be even vaguely competitive in the sport now, you need to push young tweens and teens into these insane schedules. On his AAA team last year, 7 kids sustained career ending injuries last year (3 catastrophic concussions, 2 blown out knees, 1 arm/shoulder injury and 1 broken pelvis). They were all quickly replaced with kids waiting in the queue to take their place.

I get the NHL wants to maximize profits and I LOVE watching hockey! I just think the NHL/DIV 1 system in hockey has gone beyond what is right. It will never feel "normal" to be watching the Stanley Cup in June...
I haven't seen an uptick in NHL injuries since the expansion in the '90s to 82 games. I agree that kids shouldn't be playing that much, but it hasn't seemed to impact the NHL much at all.
 
USA Hockey has a lot of safeguards to prevent injuries, but hockey is a contact sport and injuries are going to happen. They recently increased the age for full contact from PeeWee (11-12) up to Bantam (13-14), supposedly to help prevent injuries while the kids' bodies were developing before puberty. If you've ever seen PeeWee's check, it's laughable... they just kind of bump each other. That's really a silly rule, what they need to do is to teach the kids how to check properly and how to play heads-up hockey, which is how you prevent injuries. That's why there's such emphasis on preventing head contact.

In terms of the schedule and intensity, I don't think AAA hockey (which is for advanced players, and isn't easy or cheap to get into) and certainly Div I college hockey (which is really hard to get into) is much different that other sports at that same level. It's all about how serious they are about playing... and how talented they are. Being physically big helps too, especially at the younger ages. You don't see many 5'9" NHL players anymore.
 
I haven't seen an uptick in NHL injuries since the expansion in the '90s to 82 games. I agree that kids shouldn't be playing that much, but it hasn't seemed to impact the NHL much at all.

Not sure if there is any data from the "old days" about injuries. But, today, one thing online betting has given us (besides bankruptcies...) is amazingly detailed info on things like player injuries and availabilities.

For the 2023-24 season (so far) there have been 499 player injuries that caused a player to miss at least one game and 127 season ending injuries (no data I could find on how many of those were career ending, but you could probably glean a lot from the injury, if you cared to dig that deep). So, about half the players that touched the ice in the NHL this year sustained at least one injury that knocked them out for a game and about 12% of the players sustained season ending injuries. I have no clue how that stacks up against the 80's and 90's.

USA Hockey has a lot of safeguards to prevent injuries, but hockey is a contact sport and injuries are going to happen. They recently increased the age for full contact from PeeWee (11-12) up to Bantam (13-14), supposedly to help prevent injuries while the kids' bodies were developing before puberty. If you've ever seen PeeWee's check, it's laughable... they just kind of bump each other. That's really a silly rule, what they need to do is to teach the kids how to check properly and how to play heads-up hockey, which is how you prevent injuries. That's why there's such emphasis on preventing head contact.

In terms of the schedule and intensity, I don't think AAA hockey (which is for advanced players, and isn't easy or cheap to get into) and certainly Div I college hockey (which is really hard to get into) is much different that other sports at that same level. It's all about how serious they are about playing... and how talented they are. Being physically big helps too, especially at the younger ages. You don't see many 5'9" NHL players anymore.

All true. The equipment today is WAY better than when I played competitively. I still like to play in the geriatric beer league and am constantly amazed at how much better the equipment is from my youth.

Agree very much on the detriment of raising the age for checking. Now, when they introduce checking at 14U, you have players on the ice that are still 5' tall and weigh 100 pounds alongside a post-puberty 14 year old at 6' and 200 pounds (that is almost exactly the height/weight range on my son's team when he played 14U). If you introduced checking when they were all younger and universally smaller, they would learn how to check and receive a check before you had this massive size discrepancy. I am not a fan of raising the age of checking leagues.

As for schedule compared to other sports, agree. This is a problem with youth sports in North America. When I grew up, I could play 3 varsity sports (football, hockey and lacrosse for me) and still maintain a DIV 1 level competitiveness in my main sport (hockey). Now, you pretty much have to specialize in one sport and play it exclusively all year round if you want to be competitive. I watch kid after kid in my son's leagues get smashed (it was a rare game this past year that someone on one side of the ice didn't get removed from the game on a stretcher - we had 5 games get called off early due to catastrophic injuries) and, anecdotally, do not remember that many injuries in the AAA level hockey I played.

I understand completely that the push for more money has forced all the pro leagues into these very long schedules and I don't deny them the right to maximize the profits. I also understand the pros get paid handsomely for their jobs and don't deny them the opportunity to make big money and assume the risk involved. I just don't think the effect it has had on our youth sports is healthy for our kids. And, yeah, in the case of youth hockey, I think USA Hockey has lost their way in so many cases and they make odd decisions/rules that are counter-productive to both player safety AND competitiveness. Hockey Canada seems to have done a much better job in making more sane decisions over the past decade or two.
 
Not sure if there is any data from the "old days" about injuries. But, today, one thing online betting has given us (besides bankruptcies...) is amazingly detailed info on things like player injuries and availabilities.

For the 2023-24 season (so far) there have been 499 player injuries that caused a player to miss at least one game and 127 season ending injuries (no data I could find on how many of those were career ending, but you could probably glean a lot from the injury, if you cared to dig that deep). So, about half the players that touched the ice in the NHL this year sustained at least one injury that knocked them out for a game and about 12% of the players sustained season ending injuries. I have no clue how that stacks up against the 80's and 90's.
Can't find any injury stats, but I did find that when they updated to the 82 game schedule, they actually were coming DOWN from an 84 game schedule that was used in the 92/93 and 93/94 seasons. They went to an 80 game schedule in the '74/'75 season, so I wouldn't think you'd see much of a change in player injuries due to the length of the season in the NHL.
 
Can't find any injury stats, but I did find that when they updated to the 82 game schedule, they actually were coming DOWN from an 84 game schedule that was used in the 92/93 and 93/94 seasons. They went to an 80 game schedule in the '74/'75 season, so I wouldn't think you'd see much of a change in player injuries due to the length of the season in the NHL.
You are correct, the seasons have always been long:

1960: Start of Season - 5 OCT 60, Stanley Cup Final - 16 APR 61, 194 days
1970: Start of Season - 9 OCT 70, Stanley Cup Final - 18 MAY 71, 222 days
1980: Start of Season - 9 OCT 80, Stanley Cup Final - 21 MAY 81, 225 days
1990: Start of Season - 4 OCT 90, Stanley Cup Final - 25 MAY 91, 234 days
2000: Start of Season - 4 OCT 00, Stanley Cup Final - 9 JUN 01, 249 days
2010: Start of Season - 7 OCT 10, Stanley Cup Final - 15 JUN 11, 252 days
2023: Start of Season - 10 OCT 23, Stanley Cup Final - 21 JUN 24 or 24 JUN 24, 256 or 259 days
 
Personally, I think the "B" level should be no-check, with checking introduced at Squirts (9-10). That will teach the kids that they need to keep their heads up, while they're small enough so that hits won't cause any injuries. They There's a stigma attached to playing "B" hockey, "Oh, so you don't think my kid is very good?". There's a stigma attached to "B" hockey, they need to call it something else, perhaps "Recreational", so that the parents get the idea that the primary purpose is to have fun and learn the game, and not to "advance". It's all about the kid... if THEY like it enough to move on, great, if not, hey they had a fun experience for a few months out of the year. I see way too many "hockey parents" that make it all about pushing their kid too hard, and the kid ends up "retiring" once they reach middle school and have other things to do with their life.
 
You are correct, the seasons have always been long:

1960: Start of Season - 5 OCT 60, Stanley Cup Final - 16 APR 61, 194 days
1970: Start of Season - 9 OCT 70, Stanley Cup Final - 18 MAY 71, 222 days
1980: Start of Season - 9 OCT 80, Stanley Cup Final - 21 MAY 81, 225 days
1990: Start of Season - 4 OCT 90, Stanley Cup Final - 25 MAY 91, 234 days
2000: Start of Season - 4 OCT 00, Stanley Cup Final - 9 JUN 01, 249 days
2010: Start of Season - 7 OCT 10, Stanley Cup Final - 15 JUN 11, 252 days
2023: Start of Season - 10 OCT 23, Stanley Cup Final - 21 JUN 24 or 24 JUN 24, 256 or 259 days
Don't forget the 2019-2020 Covid Cup... that wasn't given out until September. THAT was a long season...
 
Don't forget the 2019-2020 Covid Cup... that wasn't given out until September. THAT was a long season...

Yeah, I omitted the 1999-2022 seasons because COVID messed them all up.

Personally, I think the "B" level should be no-check, with checking introduced at Squirts (9-10). That will teach the kids that they need to keep their heads up, while they're small enough so that hits won't cause any injuries. They There's a stigma attached to playing "B" hockey, "Oh, so you don't think my kid is very good?". There's a stigma attached to "B" hockey, they need to call it something else, perhaps "Recreational", so that the parents get the idea that the primary purpose is to have fun and learn the game, and not to "advance". It's all about the kid... if THEY like it enough to move on, great, if not, hey they had a fun experience for a few months out of the year. I see way too many "hockey parents" that make it all about pushing their kid too hard, and the kid ends up "retiring" once they reach middle school and have other things to do with their life.

Completely agree on the demise of the "house league" hockey teams. It was a great venue for kids that wanted to play, but couldn't make the "travel team". Even in the "old days" the house league petered out after PeeWees, but now, it is virtually non-existent past Mites or Squirts in most places. Too bad - great opportunity for kids to enjoy the sport in a recreational way all the way to their teens.

Couldn't agree more on the toxicity parents bring to many sports now. I have been torn for years about letting my son continue in this sport. Many times I have considered making him stop, but it is his passion and he does have the skill to at least make it into DIV 1 (prob not NHL, being realistic), so I never wanted to be the one that barred him, but I do have concerns. I did make him stop playing for this summer (as opposed to the normal 3-4 weeks of hockey camps and 1-2 summer regional teams). He wasn't happy about it, but both of his feet were so messed up from the season, he needed surgery in May so he could be good again by the August start of the youth season. He took up golf last month and has been having a ball playing 3-4 days a week with his friends. I couldn't be happier that he is taking a break from hockey and playing another sport for a while. He has even talked about joining the High School golf team and maybe the teen summer golf league next year. He isn't competitive in golf, but he is having fun and I think it is super healthy to branch out from just playing hockey 12 months out of the year.

Perversely, a lot of kids in the hyper competitive sports' AAA/DIV 1/Pro leagues, often get disgruntled with the sport during the season. I can tell my son starts to get tired of hockey now by the Spring and just wishes the season would end. Many times, when he is 60-70 games into a season, it just isn't much fun anymore, even when they are winning.
 
Perversely, a lot of kids in the hyper competitive sports' AAA/DIV 1/Pro leagues, often get disgruntled with the sport during the season. I can tell my son starts to get tired of hockey now by the Spring and just wishes the season would end. Many times, when he is 60-70 games into a season, it just isn't much fun anymore, even when they are winning.o
That’s why I’ve only ever done mountain biking, It’s a sport that challenges you, not you’re team so you get to do it at your pace.

Ps we also live here in the Appalachians so we’ve got plenty of places to ride.
 
You are correct, the seasons have always been long:

1960: Start of Season - 5 OCT 60, Stanley Cup Final - 16 APR 61, 194 days
1970: Start of Season - 9 OCT 70, Stanley Cup Final - 18 MAY 71, 222 days
1980: Start of Season - 9 OCT 80, Stanley Cup Final - 21 MAY 81, 225 days
1990: Start of Season - 4 OCT 90, Stanley Cup Final - 25 MAY 91, 234 days
2000: Start of Season - 4 OCT 00, Stanley Cup Final - 9 JUN 01, 249 days
2010: Start of Season - 7 OCT 10, Stanley Cup Final - 15 JUN 11, 252 days
2023: Start of Season - 10 OCT 23, Stanley Cup Final - 21 JUN 24 or 24 JUN 24, 256 or 259 days

Yep, the teams/league are milking the season length for all its worth = more money in their pockets.
 
Back
Top