Airbrushes, A Different Slant

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
That might work as a primer gun.

For primer only.
 
Why?

I guess I meant for me.

'cause I rarely have anything big enough to need a spray gun to paint.

Although I may have 4 or 5 rockets all waiting for the weather to break so I can prime them.

A spray gun would make quicker work of spraying primer on a bunch of rockets all at once.

I rarely have anything bigger than a BT-80 model.

Preping and cleaning a spray gun is a lot of trouble for a smaller rocket...I just use a rattle can.

Besides, I can't tell what quality that unit is from the pic.
 
I'm getting into some larger rockets (Enedeavor and it's ilk) and wonder if an airbrush is the right tool to do the main body paint for a 4" x 71" airframe. I want to try some of the more interesting colors and, IIRC, you need to keep a wet edge to make for a nice finish with high gloss/candy/metallic paints. I would think that overly challenging if you only have a couple of ounces of paint in your jar.
 
Al, I think you could do well with that gun and the paints you mention.and I look forward to seeing the results.
 
Originally posted by Hospital_Rocket
Gordon -> can you tell me why?

HR:
It's going to depend on the Size of the model your painting, Even on LMR's I rarely need more then a 5oz airbursh bottle to complete a 60" bt-80 size model. If you plan on painting HPR models than I'd say sure, if you have a decent compressors with tank. 45psi will empty a 20gal tank pretty quickly. I have a low volume air spary gun and a touch-up gun similar to the one your looking at. I think I've used both once since their purchase. it's just more convienent to use a 3 or 5 oz resealable airbrush bottle than mixing paint or primer in that huge cup.
Hope this helps.
 
I'll agree with micromister here.

A 4x71" model is pretty large and though I think I *could* do this with my airbrush (Paasche H, #5 nozzle, cranked up to "full bore"), a small detail gun would be a better choice. A full sized spray gun is definitey too big, though.

I couldn't get your links to work, but here's a couple of details guns for not too much money:

https://www.apackrat.com/home_&_garden/air_tools/air_guns/951789.html
https://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=46720

Be sure you have enough compressor flow and/or tank capacity.

Since you mentioned your interest in high-gloss, candies and metallics, let me warn you this may well lead you into the more specialized side of paint formulations. If what you're after is the effects you see on custom motorcycles and cars, be aware that they use materials that are often times not so simple to handle - particularily the isocyanate hardener ('2-pack") clear coats that give that ultra-deep, wet-looking gloss. Full-face, positive air pressure respirators are the recommended choice here (solvent filter respirators are OK for lacquers, but not isocyanate based hardener technology). Though I am capable of "gearing up" to shoot this sort of stuff, these days I tend to avoid doing so unless absolutely necessary. I really wish there were friendlier/safer products that could give these sort of effects without the saftey hassles. I would be willing to trade some ultimate durability (after all we're not painting cars here). With auto-paint suppliers needing to come up with more eco-friendly products, maybe that will eventually trickle down to our level.
 
I was looking at the House of Kolor paints.

I understand about the really sophisicated show car finishes being for the skilled. I think if I ever really get into those kinds, I will just find an auto shop and pay them to do the paint.

A
 
Myself I think a show car finish is simple. Because the quality
of the materials are so much better. Your getting what you pay
for, And house of colors is one of the best.
most of all you need a place where you can use these kinds of primer and paints. I do all of mine outside because of the fumes.
Then you need a good compressor to supply enough air.
mixing most of the pimers and paints. just need to be thined.
And a activator or a hardner to make them dry. So you can mix
up small amounts at time. working with only a few ounces of
materials. The primers is where I see the diffrence.Has alot more
soilds, so it builds and fills fast. Most paints jobs only need two
coats of this.
 
if you go with HOK expect to spend some money on a equivalent pricey clear coat .. no sense in covering one of the top of the line paints with a bargan clear... it gets expensive when your dealing with HOK
 
To midpwrguy's comments that the auto paints are "simple". This is true if you are careful about setup, prep, temp/humidity conditions and mixing. The shooting is remarkably easy with such good product and good guns. Like anything else, though, it's all the other stuff that makes it a hassle.

Many airbrush artists outsource the clear coating to autobody shops, as they can use safer products for base and layered color coats.

Honestly, I don't find shooting outside an ideal solution to the problems that isocyanate fumes present. First, you can't control where those fumes are going, the breeze could blow it right into your face. Second, especially here in dry, dusty Colorado, getting dust-free results in an uncontrolled outdoor environment is not a good bet.

As for HOK products, they make both 1 and 2-part formulations. It's the 2-part stuff (with the isocyanate hardeners) - e.g. the clear coats - that demand special attention. The "regular" 1-part paints, including many of their base and regular color coats can be safely handled with normal respirators and normal ventilation conditions. So, if you're willing to pony up the money for their products, I say go for it.
 
Originally posted by Hospital_Rocket
I was looking at the House of Kolor paints.

I understand about the really sophisicated show car finishes being for the skilled. I think if I ever really get into those kinds, I will just find an auto shop and pay them to do the paint.

A

HP:
Just to add a little to limd21 was saying Please be very aware of the materials your shooting. All 2 and 3 part urethanes and polyurethane paint system hardners contain isocyanates which are cumulative in the body, they go in but they NEVER come out...very nasty stuff. If your using these products you must use a supplied air respirator. We had an extreamly talented painter permanently disabled because he was a hard head, refusing to use a "confining" supplied air mask system that would have saved his life. Charcoal fliter masks and dust particle masks are useless against isocyanates. Please be careful, Read every single warning lable. Yes paint can Kill.
 
I managed in a organic chem lab experiment to get flogged by an Isocyanate poison. I spent two freaking days in the hospital on O2
I'm a gonna stick with water based.

If it flys as planned, nobody can see the paint, if it does not, I don't want anybody noticing the pretty paperweight.

A
 
Originally posted by Hospital_Rocket
I'm a gonna stick with water based.

If it flys as planned, nobody can see the paint, if it does not, I don't want anybody noticing the pretty paperweight.

A

HR:
Your don't have to go quite that far, most Enamels and even some lacquer based paints work just fine in airbrush and touch-up gun applications. Personally I'm partical to enamels which I can modify if needed into a polyurethane with addition of a hardener;)
I think the best Item I've come across in the last 5 years was my introduction to 3M Finessit-II compound. I've taken a seriously Orange peeled nasty old Krylon spray can painted finish to a mirror polished, smooth as a babies butt surface with that product and some elbow grease. Kinda pricey at 22 buck a quart but worth ever last penny.
Hope this helps.
 
Back
Top