Adam Savage's Favorite Tools: Japanese Hand Saws

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stealth6

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I started using Japanese (and other) pull saws (dozuki, kataba, ryoba) many many years ago, and never looked back. Vastly superior to western style "push" hand saws in every way. These days any time I find myself in a situation where I have to use a "normal" saw (like borrowing from someone else, or that's what's available, etc.) I find myself thinking "what the heck is this piece of crap?".

I didn't even watch the video you posted, but I'm assuming the guy in them is extolling the virtues of these saws, yes?

(I even rhymed "dozuki" with "bouzouki" in a punk rock song my band played back in the day)

s6
 

heada

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I still use a western style cross-cut saw for trimming limbs off trees (very aggresive and needs wet wood). I also use one for doing break down of large lumber into manageable pieces which then go to the jointer and planer. For any kind of detail work like cutting tenons or dovetails, I go with a pull saw because they're more precise.
 

OKTurbo

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Yes! One of my favorite tools. I’m no Adam Savage, but here’s the video I did.
 

dr wogz

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I have one, and yes, I do like it to the "western' style.

But one issue I find is that when I pull, the end tends to vibrate, so it doesn't come thru the piece as easily as I would expect it to..
 

mjennings

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Neat. I'll have to look into getting one.
 

stealth6

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I have one, and yes, I do like it to the "western' style.

But one issue I find is that when I pull, the end tends to vibrate, so it doesn't come thru the piece as easily as I would expect it to..
Two things:

1 - Sometimes if you pull too hard, and/or bear down on the cut in an effort to be more aggressive, this can happen. Try "letting the saw" do the cutting a bit more, and back off a bit. Also a shorter blade tends do the vibration thing a bit less, so don't necessarily go with a larger/longer saw if you don't need to.

2 - Look into "dozuki" saws. These Japanese saws have a rigid spine (similar to an English "back saw") and you pretty much get no vibration/wiggle of the blade. They also have very thin blades and therefore make very thin kerfs. As well, the blades are easily replaceable (and often relatively inexpensive to do so). They are usually made as a crosscut saw, where they excel. But the crosscut versions also work pretty well in ripping. If you do want a dedicated rip saw, blades are available (though a bit harder to find in the US).
The downside to a dozuki style saw is that the spine means you can't cutter deeper than the blade itself, so if you are cutting all the way through a thick piece of stock they sometimes aren't the best tool for the job.

Make sawdust!,
s6
 

dr wogz

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Two things:

1 - Sometimes if you pull too hard, and/or bear down on the cut in an effort to be more aggressive, this can happen. Try "letting the saw" do the cutting a bit more, and back off a bit. Also a shorter blade tends do the vibration thing a bit less, so don't necessarily go with a larger/longer saw if you don't need to.

2 - Look into "dozuki" saws. These Japanese saws have a rigid spine (similar to an English "back saw") and you pretty much get no vibration/wiggle of the blade. They also have very thin blades and therefore make very thin kerfs. As well, the blades are easily replaceable (and often relatively inexpensive to do so). They are usually made as a crosscut saw, where they excel. But the crosscut versions also work pretty well in ripping. If you do want a dedicated rip saw, blades are available (though a bit harder to find in the US).
The downside to a dozuki style saw is that the spine means you can't cutter deeper than the blade itself, so if you are cutting all the way through a thick piece of stock they sometimes aren't the best tool for the job.

Make sawdust!,
s6
yeah, when cutting 2x4s mainly.. I try to be smooth with long steady strokes..
 

Woody's Workshop

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I've used a lot of machines and hand tools.
Pull saws do a much better job than push saws every time.
If you want to get into hand tools, and even make some for yourself.
This guy can teach you a lot, and he is fun to watch.
I support his channel, it's $2.99 a month.
Even if you are experienced like me, you will learn stuff.
I did, and I'm sure you will too.
Rex Krueger
 
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