38MM Hardware?

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mjslive2fly

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Newbie here. Any recommendations on 38MM hardware? Years ago I was given a Dr. Rocket 38/240 case with fore/aft closures although I think I'm missing the seal disk? Should I go with this or switch to some other hardware?

Planning on a BSD .38 Special for an L1 Cert sometime this year.

Thanks for any info.
 

COrocket

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I would recommend looking at Cesaroni. The hardware is less expensive, and they require minimal assembly and are a breeze and clean up. Also, a ProDAT tool eliminates the hassle of finding different delay times if you are using something other than the medium delay that is supplied with Aerotech. The case spacers also allow for different reloads to fly in the same case, which is a major plus.

Also, you don't need a seal disk for your 38/240 hardware. They are only required for motors that are 38/480 and above. I would recommend certifying on an Aerotech H123W that fits in your case, because you are set with what you have and can get a good discount on a certification reload.

I certified my L1 with Aerotech, then tried some larger I motors with Cesaroni and I loved them.
 
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Handeman

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Newbie here. Any recommendations on 38MM hardware? Years ago I was given a Dr. Rocket 38/240 case with fore/aft closures although I think I'm missing the seal disk? Should I go with this or switch to some other hardware?

Planning on a BSD .38 Special for an L1 Cert sometime this year.

Thanks for any info.
If 50 people answer this, you'll probably get 50 different answers.

CTI has come out with grain spacers that let you fly three different size motors in the same case. That saves a lot on cases, but the reload cost is higher then Aerotech.
The Aerotech (Dr. Rocket & Rouse Tech are the same thing) have higher casing costs, but the reloads are less. Aerotech is also coming out with grain spacers so you should be able to fly different number of grains in the same case, just like the CTI.
The other difference is ease of assembly. The CTI are very simple. The Aerotech are more complicated, although I don't think they are hard to do at all.
Then there is the types of propellants available. Each vendor has a variety of propellant types. What kind do you want to fly?

That's just the arguments for CTI and Aerotech, I haven't even mentioned the snap ring case and loads like Loki, AMW etc.

As for the 38/240 case, that is a good case and you don't need the seal disk for any of those reloads. The seal disk in only required when you get up into the 38/480 and larger loads.

I would recommend you get an Aerotech 38/360 and maybe a 38/480 case. You only need the case since you already have the closures. You might want to get a seal disk for some of the 480 loads. Then you might want to get the 6 grain CTI case with a couple of spacers. Between those 4 cases, you can fly H & I motors in the Aerotech, including the I1299N warp9 load, one of my favorites, and 4 to 6 grain I & J loads in the CTI case.

OR get a 38/600 Aerotech case and a couple of Aerotech spacers. Between that case and spacers and your 240 case, you can fly any 2, 3, 4, 5 grain Aerotech loads.

Good Luck. I'm working through the same thing with 54mm cases right now.
 

stickershock23

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I would recommend looking at Cesaroni. The hardware is less expensive, and they require minimal assembly and are a breeze and clean up. Also, a ProDAT tool eliminates the hassle of finding different delay times if you are using something other than the medium delay that is supplied with Aerotech. The case spacers also allow for different reloads to fly in the same case, which is a major plus.



I

I have to agree in the long run you'll spend less money, and have an easier to use system. Especially if you are semi new to high power. Also you have more choices of propellant types.

I have found that CTI is so easy to use, I get more flights in and I don't have to prep rockets the day before, I can do it right at the launch site.

Of course dont toss the case you have. it's always niceto have several choices!
 

Binder Design

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I like snap ring hardware so I'd vote Loki. Bottom line is....Get whichever hardware that your onsite vendor carries reloads for.

Mike Fisher
 

stickershock23

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I like snap ring hardware so I'd vote Loki. Bottom line is....Get whichever hardware that your onsite vendor carries reloads for.

Mike Fisher
This is true and also great if you ever decide to get into EX motors. snaprings are so simple!
 

H_Rocket

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In answer to your one question, with a 38-480 you do not need a seal disk.

As to preferences, if this is your first HPR motor, I suggest you look at learning to fly with this one and then deciding whatever brand meets your needs from there. I mean you are halfway done and the reloads are only going to cost in the $19-$30 range. It's a cheap L1. Plus, you get the opportunity to (if you add electronics) to slap it silly with a H999 Warp 9

Two outstanding reloads available for it are the H148 Redline and the H123 White Lightning.

Afterwards, it gets real personal. The best advice it to choose what you can easily get and from that choose what you like.

I have most all of them:
  • AMW
  • AT/Rouse/Dr. Rocket
  • CTI
  • Ellis
  • Gorilla
  • Skyripper
Each has its own special place and I am an equal opportunity pyro-whore.
 

cjl

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Get whatever your local/onsite dealer stocks. People can argue about motor preferences all day long (and all brands have their benefits), but at the end of the day, if your dealer stocks Aerotech only, then get Aerotech. If all they stock is Loki, get Loki. This will make it a lot easier to get motors, and you won't need to pay Hazmat.

That having been said, I like AT and Cesaroni.
 

Gillard

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Get whatever your local/onsite dealer stocks. People can argue about motor preferences all day long (and all brands have their benefits), but at the end of the day, if your dealer stocks Aerotech only, then get Aerotech. If all they stock is Loki, get Loki. This will make it a lot easier to get motors, and you won't need to pay Hazmat.

That having been said, I like AT and Cesaroni.
got to agree with this.
no good getting a motor casing if your supplier does not stock the reloads.
 

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