2017 - Return of the Year of the Bike

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georgegassaway

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The bike I have could be better...... but mostly in the sense of being able to keep up better on group rides or to ride longer distances for the same amount of energy/exercise expended.

As far as exercise, to me it does not matter if my bike isn't so efficient when riding solo - if I'm willing and able to ride "X" distance. If the bike was easier to ride then I could ride "X+Y" distance,but the amount of exercise would be the same. If I only still rode "X" distance, I'd be done faster, but would have had LESS excercise. I know some could quibble with that, but it works for me.

The opposite end of that spectrum is when people on the group rides have electric bikes. Yeah, good for them - they can "out ride" me, and blow past me going up hills or anywhere else. But none of the electric riders should ever dare to tell me I need to speed up! :) Anyway, they are not getting in as much exercise, they are riding more for the sake of riding with a group or taking some "hard" trail more easily. UPDATE - Boatgeek mentioned commuting. Yeah, I wasn't thinking about that, just the group rides I've been on. Commuting means a commitment every day (or every time weather allows) no matter how much you may feel up to it that day. And electric is a great way to do that, use as-needed.

That all said, definitely should have a good comfortable bike to ride, not a crappy too-cheap one (or even mid-range that just does not fit you for whatever reasons - see the other thread or things like bike fit). But it does not have to be really expensive unless you want to do a group ride more easily or set some impressive mileage total rather than doing it for the sake of exercise.

I am glad this thread got revived today. Reminds me that on Monday's group ride my front brakes went out, a little over halfway into the ride. Could not get them fixed, but the brake pads do seem to be worn out in any case (just so bizarre that while I'd had some noise from them in recent weeks, they went from "OK" to almost nothing from one minute to the next).

Anyway, after googling a few minutes ago for where I might get some brake pads.....and not wanting to risk a bad job on replacing them, I decided my health is more important than a few bucks. So I'm going to drive over to a bike shop I REALLY trust (a 25 minute drive), and have them replace the pads. Or do whatever else is needed, as it is still very strange they went out so fast). Need to do that today since there is another group ride I plan to do Wednesday, and forgot I needed to plan to do that today till seeing this thread.

As for my own riding, with the broken arm setback over winter, slow start, then a 2 month summer time-out from any riding to get things ready for NARAM, I'm at about 620 miles for the year.
 
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DRAGON64

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Called Blevins Bike Shop here in Huntsville, AL and talked with a guy, who said me may already have a few models in mind for me. I will be at their store bright and early on Saturday morning. Sorry to read about the health issues there H_Rocket... Hopefully you can get recovered real soon.

The doctors say that weight loss is key, but so is physical activity. I already walk at work about 1.125 miles in the AM, and hope to start walking with my wife in the evenings, at least until it gets cold. But like I first stated, that money is buring a hole in my pocket, and it seemed like the logical choice to spend it on my health (for a new bike), then more hobby stuff that I seem to keep in long storage.
 
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Peartree

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The thread referenced a couple posts ago was mine. We still haven't pulled the trigger. We were out of town on a mission trip to the Kentucky mountains and came home to a freezer leaking all over the garage floor. We were able to save most everything but buying a new freezer put a crimp in our budget for a month or three.
 

DRAGON64

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The bike I have could be better...... but mostly in the sense of being able to keep up better on group rides or to ride longer distances for the same amount of energy/exercise expended.

As far as exercise, to me it does not matter if my bike isn't so efficient when riding solo - if I'm willing and able to ride "X" distance. If the bike was easier to ride then I could ride "X+Y" distance,but the amount of exercise would be the same. If I only still rode "X" distance, I'd be done faster, but would have had LESS excercise. I know some could quibble with that, but it works for me.

The opposite end of that spectrum is when people on the group rides have electric bikes. Yeah, good for them - they can "out ride" me, and blow past me going up hills or anywhere else. But none of the electric riders should ever dare to tell me I need to speed up! :) Anyway, they are not getting in as much exercise, they are riding more for the sake of riding with a group or taking some "hard" trail more easily.

That all said, definitely should have a good comfortable bike to ride, not a crappy too-cheap one (or even mid-range that just does not fit you for whatever reasons - see the other thread or things like bike fit). But it does not have to be really expensive unless you want to do a group ride more easily or set some impressive mileage total rather than doing it for the sake of exercise.

I am glad this thread got revived today. Reminds me that on Monday's group ride my front brakes went out, a little over halfway into the ride. Could not get them fixed, but the brake pads do seem to be worn out in any case (just so bizarre that while I'd had some noise from them in recent weeks, they went from "OK" to almost nothing from one minute to the next).

Anyway, after googling a few minutes ago for where I might get some brake pads.....and not wanting to risk a bad job on replacing them, I decided my health is more important than a few bucks. So I'm going to drive over to a bike shop I REALLY trust (a 25 minute drive), and have them replace the pads. Or do whatever else is needed, as it is still very strange they went out so fast). Need to do that today since there is another group ride I plan to do Wednesday, and forgot I needed to plan to do that today till seeing this thread.

As for my own riding, with the broken arm setback over winter, slow start, then a 2 month summer time-out from any riding to get things ready for NARAM, I'm at about 620 miles for the year.
Hope the arm is better George. Thanks for the advice, I know you have posted it a number of times, but it never gets old. Like you, I am seeking a ride that is more upright and comfortable. I have locations to ride, and more to seek out etc. I am really looking forward to the journey. I searched the local craigslist ads hoping to get a nice bike at a nice price. But there was not much to look at locally, unless I am just not seeing the value in whats posted, because I just don't know enough of what I am looking at. I feel kind of pressured at the moment to get something, what with the change in the weather leading to more favorable riding conditions and temps.

As for the Wallyworld bike in the garage... I had planned to donate the bike to Christmas Charities... someone out there needs it more than I.
 

georgegassaway

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I lucked out for the bike I got via Craigslist. $120 for an old 24 speed Gary Fisher Solstice Hybrid. The owner was tall like me, so fortunately I got the right frame size.... otherwise I could have made a terrible mistake and gotten a too-small frame. At the owner's place, I did ride it around the block to confirm it rode & felt OK before paying for it.

Spent some more bucks such as a seat that I was more comfortable with (took a few tries), and by the next spring replaced the semi-knobby hybrid tires with some smoother (and narrower) road tread tires for less rolling resistance. After nearly 2 years and maybe around 2800 miles or so on those tires by the end of the year, I'll probably replace them for 2018's ride season.

Oh, yeah, also replaced the handgrips. The original round ones were very uncomfortable, got a more ergonomic set. A friend gave me some other things, such as lights, though I added to those. Did other things that were not as necessary but things I wanted to do. Which included a $60 used iPhone 4 to run the Cyclemeter app, which is a fantastic bike computer that also logs GPS data for the ride. Almost like having a co-rider when riding solo, so the solo rides are more interesting. Also got an app called iArrow that is a compass showing distance and bearing. I always reset it to my current location before starting a group ride, so if I got dropped I can use it to steer me back to my car's location.

But if I could have afforded a better bike, i'd have gone to a reputable bike shop. I have learned over time there are bike STORES, that are often high priced and salespeople are into it mostly for their commission (Cough - Eriks - cough). And bike SHOPS where sure they want to make money, but they also care more that the customer gets the right kind of bike and has a good riding experience. And also have great repair service, without ripping you off.

So, I"m heading out for my favorite bike shop in a few minutes.....
 
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Kallahan11

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Called Blevins Bike Shop here in Huntsville, AL and talked with a guy, who said me may already have a few models in mind for me. I will be at their store bright and early on Saturday morning. Sorry to read about the health issues there H_Rocket... Hopefully you can get recovered real soon.

Besides being overweight, I was diagnosed with multiple pulminary emboli in late July, and came as close as I ever want to the long sleep... The doctors say that weight loss is key, but so id physical activity. I already walk at work about 1.125 miles in the AM, and hope to start walking with my wife in the evenings, at least until it gets cold. But like I first stated, that money is buring a hole in my pocket, and it seemed like the logical choice to spend it on my health (for a new bike), then more hobby stuff that I seem to keep in long storage.
There is a simple solution to the health/hobby spending, pick up cycling as a hobby, then you get to double dip. At least that's what I tell myself.

Anywho, after the leg infection set me back in april about a month I've rejiggered my goal to 2500 miles, of which I'm at 2049 right now. The light in evening is dying quick now so weekday miles will drop but I see another 450 miles as an easy goal. Made it though the DALMAC ride this year again from east Lansing MI to St. Ignace MI in the UP, which helped my miles significantly.
 

boatgeek

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I'm one of those annoying electric bike riders. :) The upside for me is that I can ride my 25-mile round trip commute 3-4 days a week year round instead of 1-2 days a week and not in winter. It's also pretty time-competitive with driving, which will only get better as Seattle traffic seizes up more. I do try not to be a jerk on the trail, but I admit to a little satisfaction when I pass someone for the third time because they didn't want some weedy middle-aged guy riding upright showing them up. They pass me in a burst of speed, slow down a little, I pass them at the same speed I was riding, rinse, repeat.

My best investments (besides the superhero bike) have been a more comfortable seat and good lights. For road and packed trails, I like the 50-80 PSI tires that are about 1" wide and have a little tread but not big knobs. They're a nice compromise between comfort, traction, and efficiency.

I'm only at 1370 miles for the year. Summer vacation took a toll on my riding. Gotta get back to it hard for the fall to make 2017.
 

DRAGON64

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There is a simple solution to the health/hobby spending, pick up cycling as a hobby, then you get to double dip. At least that's what I tell myself.

Anywho, after the leg infection set me back in april about a month I've rejiggered my goal to 2500 miles, of which I'm at 2049 right now. The light in evening is dying quick now so weekday miles will drop but I see another 450 miles as an easy goal. Made it though the DALMAC ride this year again from east Lansing MI to St. Ignace MI in the UP, which helped my miles significantly.
Cycling as a hobby... I'm sure there is room, and my money is probably better spent too! My dad always said that spending money on a "healthier you" pays back in far better dividends.
 

DRAGON64

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There is a year end sale going on at a local bike shop, and here is my potential shopping list: Trek bike (their main brand); grips similar to what George has on his bike; saddle (cause those stock saddles are non-existent) and a helmet. Speaking of helmet, anyone recommend a decent helmet? $150 is not in my budget of $600...
 

Kallahan11

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Any helmet should do, they all have to meet safety standars and with the exception of mips helmets you just get lighter/better venting with more money.
 

Kallahan11

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Saddles are a wierd thing, a big plush saddle is fine for 10 mile rides and such, bur after that they will start chaffing. The reason all decent bikes come with the saddles they do is because they expect you to wear cycling shorts with a chamois. This keeps the padding attached to you and not the buke which reduces chaffing for longer rides. You can get cycling shorts/pants that look like normal clothes btw or even underwear with a chamois.

For example, i cannot ride my road bike withkut my cycling shorts, but with them (and chamois cream) i can do 70 mile rides with little disomfort.

I would start with a comfy saddle and keep your original. If you get to the point where your veing chaafed, but the original back on and try cycling shorts with chamois cream.
 

DRAGON64

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Saddles are a wierd thing, a big plush saddle is fine for 10 mile rides and such, bur after that they will start chaffing. The reason all decent bikes come with the saddles they do is because they expect you to wear cycling shorts with a chamois. This keeps the padding attached to you and not the buke which reduces chaffing for longer rides. You can get cycling shorts/pants that look like normal clothes btw or even underwear with a chamois.

For example, i cannot ride my road bike withkut my cycling shorts, but with them (and chamois cream) i can do 70 mile rides with little disomfort.

I would start with a comfy saddle and keep your original. If you get to the point where your veing chaafed, but the original back on and try cycling shorts with chamois cream.
I did not know that about riding shorts, very interesting. I suppose once I get to the store on Friday they would tell me the same thing... they may even try to sell me on a pair of shorts instead of a saddle. Thank you for that, this kind of changes my research with regards to a saddle.
 

boatgeek

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Saddles are a wierd thing, a big plush saddle is fine for 10 mile rides and such, bur after that they will start chaffing. The reason all decent bikes come with the saddles they do is because they expect you to wear cycling shorts with a chamois. This keeps the padding attached to you and not the buke which reduces chaffing for longer rides. You can get cycling shorts/pants that look like normal clothes btw or even underwear with a chamois.

For example, i cannot ride my road bike withkut my cycling shorts, but with them (and chamois cream) i can do 70 mile rides with little disomfort.

I would start with a comfy saddle and keep your original. If you get to the point where your veing chaafed, but the original back on and try cycling shorts with chamois cream.
I'm with Dilbert on this one: https://dilbert.com/strip/1994-07-18

Granted, I don't do 70 miles in a day, just 25 in two stretches. I have a somewhat cushy gel pad saddle with a smooth surface, wear normal shorts or fleece pants and have never had a chafing issue. I can see the possibility of chafing if you have a fuzzy saddle though. YMMV!
 

DRAGON64

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From what I remember from the last time I rode, my sit bones "hurt like the Dickens" and they eventually went numb. Found a method of sitting on cardboard and measuring my sit bones, so I have some of the info I need to select a saddle... love that Dilbert link, made laugh out load here in the office!
 

georgegassaway

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One day I did two 20 mile rides about 2 hours apart. By the end of the second one I was really hurting. My friend Chan(who commutes 20-25 miles a day and has done several 100 mile rides) had told me months before.... one day I'd finally want to get a pair of Chamois to wear. And a few days after, I did. But I got the "underwear" type, so I wear whatever type of pants that are suitable, over them. When warm/hot, athletic shorts (baggy ones). Cool enough, sweatpants. COLD, Blue Jeans.

The ones I got cost $80, IIRC. From advice I'd gotten and read, sort of the more it costs the more comfortable they tend be (up to a point anyway). So I didn't go for the cheapest, but $80 was the most I was willing to pay. Very glad I did. Also glad I tried some on in a bike shop, as the first size I tried was too small (the ends pinched my legs). Had I done mail-order that would have been bad. So that's how I found a pair that fit me properly, trying them on.

The cream I use is this: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Udderly-...5035&wl11=online&wl12=984958047&wl13=&veh=sem

BTW - my front brake pads were OK. Caliper attachment to allow slack for removing/installing the front wheel (allowing brake pads to open up much wider) had gotten dislodged - apparently when I took the bike out of a bike stand at the end of the lunch stop, front wheel had been in the stand. Discovered that was the problem while doing a final "can I fix this?" check before I was going to drive to the bike shop on Tuesday. Had a good 25 mile group ride today.
 
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Crash-n-Burn

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George mentioned chamois cream, so I will add a bit of caveat emptor. I was racing Eagleman triathlon a few years back and had just finished the 1.2 mile swim. I wanted to quickly transition to the bike portion of the race and at the bike rack gave myself a quick... application... of chamois butter. This thick, white cream is intended as a skin lubricant to prevent chafing. I take off on my bike for 56 miles feeling great, until I notice the cream is slowly seeping through the front of my shorts. It didn't dissolve.

Eventually I started the half marathon run with this gob of white goo leaking through the crotch of my tri shorts. That run was equal parts people laughing and people thinking I was enjoying myself a little too much.

So, cream is great but USE IT SPARINGLY.
 

cbrarick

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I'm old school, so it's bag balm. Find it in your local cvs, walmart or walgreens. It's cheap and has some mild bacteriostatic properties.
I never ride without shorts. My saddles are all the same - Sella Italia Flite. I was a bigger guy for racing, lived in crits sprinting. Skinny saddles rub less, just saying.

Helmet - I get the latest and greatest (now MIPS rating which provides rotational protection) and replace them every 5 years, or after it's been hit in a crash (ever). I wouldn't ever ride my bike without one. Why? because my head is worth every penny (however I didn't say the most expensive one, just the best protection). Right now MIPS rated helmets are $20-$50 more then one not MIPS rated. One of my helmets is even in the "saved by a helmet" display that rolls around the nation. 58 MPH head and shoulder first, confirmed by onboard GPS in the form of the Polar Xtrainer Plus with the GPS add-on.
Giro's cheapest MIPS is $65 per their website....but I'm hoping Santa brings me a new Synthe MIPS in yellow.
 

DRAGON64

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Thanks for the recommendation for shorts, undies, helmet, creams and balm. Bag Balm I have, use it plenty in the winter months for dry hands etc. I will need to look into the undies idea, as I am a bit 'big' for shorts yet. I would like to lose some weight before investing in riding clothes yet.
 
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DRAGON64

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I rode tested my first Trek today, a Verve 2. I t was nice and comfortable as a comfort bike. I was hoping for a more comfortable price, but $489 was a bit steep on my minimal budget of $600. I did pick a nice fitting Giro helmet for $40. Not sure if that was a good price or not, but it fit to perfectly to leave it on the table.

Tomorrow my daughter and I are visiting LBS number 2 to look at GIANT's
 

Kallahan11

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I rode tested my first Trek today, a Verve 2. I t was nice and comfortable as a comfort bike. I was hoping for a more comfortable price, but $489 was a bit steep on my minimal budget of $600. I did pick a nice fitting Giro helmet for $40. Not sure if that was a good price or not, but it fit to perfectly to leave it on the table.

Tomorrow my daughter and I are visiting LBS number 2 to look at GIANT's
Another piece of advise is when you buy the bike, consider the LBS. Most bikes under $8000 are built to spec by Giant regardless of their branding. Find a bike you like, find an LBS you like. Make sure they at least do a basic fit. the seat may feel taller than you think it needs to be but if it's too short long rides will give you knee problems. This is also something you can adjust as you ride more. If the front of your knee starts bothering you raise your seat, if your knees lock out on the down stroke, or the rear of your knee bothers you lower your seat. Pedal on the ball of your feet or a little behind that.
 

cbrarick

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Another piece of advise is when you buy the bike, consider the LBS. Most bikes under $8000 are built to spec by Giant regardless of their branding.
No.
Scott has done Schwinn, Trek, Colagno. There's tons of bicycles that retail for under 8 k that aren't Giant. I own several.
You're absolutely right about fit, it's worth every penny.
 

DRAGON64

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Thanks for the tips, even the small fit they did for me before the test ride really helped to make the ride really comfortable.

I asked the LBS that I am visiting tomorrow to send me a list of bikes in my price and size, and here is what I got in return

The Giant Cypress is a road comfort hybrid at $350. The Giant Escape is a road hybrid at $370. The Giant Roam 3 is a crossroad bike (pavement, dirt, and gravel) for $$480. The Giant Sedona DX is a crossroad bike for $490. We also have the Specialized Crossroads at $440 and the Specialized Roll at $490. I hope that helps!
I have pulled the pdf docs that GIANT provide for each of their bikes, and I am comparing feature (do I really need disc brakes etc). Also watching a number of youtube vids to help with perspective and reviews.
 

H_Rocket

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...comparing feature (do I really need disc brakes etc). Also watching a number of youtube vids to help with perspective and reviews.
Disc brakes - unless you are planning on riding a good bit in rain, grime, what have you - no. Also, discs are somewhat harder to maintain and, for the most part, out of the realm of the every day Joe's ability.

Be careful of reviews. Folks are very passionate about bikes (sometimes I think they are more crazy than rocket folks). Try them, pick one you like and rides well for you. Then get out there and ride!

Once you get crazy about it and tell everyone you see that they are dumb for not choosing your ride you will officially be a member of the tribe!

One thing. A good bike is a precision machine. You need to maintain it. Learn basic maintenance and be prepared to take it in fro service once a year (unless you want to learn bike wrenching yourself).

Also be prepared to spend maybe $50-$75 on a road kit and seat bag. You want a spare tube, some way to inflate it (either CO2 or a small pump), a multi-tool, and some tire levers. Once you get the bike, sit in your yard and learn how to change a tube. Walking a flat back sucks and the best place to learn how to fix it is not on the side of the road.
 

DRAGON64

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Disc brakes - unless you are planning on riding a good bit in rain, grime, what have you - no. Also, discs are somewhat harder to maintain and, for the most part, out of the realm of the every day Joe's ability.

Be careful of reviews. Folks are very passionate about bikes (sometimes I think they are more crazy than rocket folks). Try them, pick one you like and rides well for you. Then get out there and ride!

Once you get crazy about it and tell everyone you see that they are dumb for not choosing your ride you will officially be a member of the tribe!

One thing. A good bike is a precision machine. You need to maintain it. Learn basic maintenance and be prepared to take it in fro service once a year (unless you want to learn bike wrenching yourself).

Also be prepared to spend maybe $50-$75 on a road kit and seat bag. You want a spare tube, some way to inflate it (either CO2 or a small pump), a multi-tool, and some tire levers. Once you get the bike, sit in your yard and learn how to change a tube. Walking a flat back sucks and the best place to learn how to fix it is not on the side of the road.
Al - would you mind posting the contents in your road bag? I found your older post with the contents, but was wondering if maybe you had modified it since then. Lastly, I would like to get a bike computer for measuring distances and speed and overall milage rode etc. There are lots of choice, and one can get analysis paralysis if not careful...

My daughter and I are leaving in 45-minutes, hopefully there is a bike out there looking for me too! Thanks for the additional advice, it is very much appreciated.
 

DRAGON64

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So I went to the LBS otherwise known as Blevins Bike Shop, with my heart set on a GIANT Escape... to disappointment, the Escape was quite an uncomfortable ride. The salesman, who was quite knowledgeable (and patient) tested out and then let me ride 5-different models: GIANT - Escape, ROAM & Sedona Then the Specialized ROLL & Crossroads. The ROLL was nice, with a comfortable seat, and large tires, sporting 7-gears. Out of all of the models, I disliked the disc brakes on the GIANT ROAM; to me the stopping distance seemed long, and the system produced brake noise. Out of these models, only the Crossroads from Specialized produced the most comfortable ride. It was the last model I tested, and I really liked it. The main difference from this model and all the others, is the front and rear gear sets are shifted by turning the ring to the inside of both grips. I do not have a pic yet, but I will post a link to the bike. Mine is the satin black like the one pictured:

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/fitness/crossroads/106441
 

DRAGON64

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So I should be out riding instead of posting to this thread so much... but I have been! I am soaked with sweat, and about to bust a vein! What a workout. Not sure how far I we went, my daughter and I, but it was uphill for half of it. Getting used to shifting had me really working harder than I should... Seat-time will cure all.

So here is the bike I am replacing; a Huffy Stone Mountain II. I rode it for about a week some 20-years ago, and it was just not any fun. Except for dry rotted tires, it is in fairly new condition...



This is my new Crossroads... light as a feather, big as a Clydesdale...





I love the grips on this bike, very comfortable hold. Note the Shimano left and right derailer shifters just to the inside of the grips...



I am assuming a standard derailer by Shimano (?)



I did upgrade to a little larger pedal for a more sure footing. I had no problem with the stock pedals, other than the heels of my shoes rubbing the frame as I pedaled. The Nike shoes I wear for walking are not really well suited for bikes...



The saddle, albeit small, is a gel saddle, and quite comfortable...



I did purchase the bottle cage, and a small (basic) bike computer. The store mounted the cage, but I will mount the computer this evening.

So that is it for the time being... It has been a long time in the making, but everything is starting to come together now.
 

cbrarick

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DRAGON64

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my bag is simple
this tool https://www.parktool.com/product/i-beam-mini-fold-up-with-chain-tool-ib-3?category=Multi-Tools
some spare chain links
pieces of old inner tube, cut up
patch kit
spare tube
couple of zip ties
2 $20 bills (a boot and a spare for use)
a Gu (in case I forget gels and bonk)
this pump strapped underneath https://www.westernbikeworks.com/pr...MI6f-07O-q1gIVBUSGCh14awFwEAQYAiABEgKlPPD_BwE
Thanks for that, I may be able to cobble something very similar minus the pump for the time being.

So day two saw slow progress; I know many of you jumped on your bikes a ride for miles and miles... I'm lucky to last a mile or two round trip from the house. I tried to blow it off as just "getting used to a new bike" but I soon realized that once I get home, I am ready to just chill. Once rested, that is when the soreness really kicks in... not just the legs, but everywhere. I'm not taking this soreness with a negative attitude, but as a message, that biking is working like it should, waking up muscles that have been dormant for far too long. I am learning the bike, and soon realized I have a long way to go to get well accessorized;

First off, the soles of my shoes are too wide, and sometimes the heel of the sole gets caught under the frame of the bike when I pedal. Also, even though I bought a bigger pedal, they are still plastic and my feet tend to slip off from time to time. While riding I have pictured myself falling or crashing, and I try to think of what I would need to protect myself. Gloves! I tried some on at the LBS, but even the fingerless gloves felt restricting and too insulated for warm summer days. I'm sure I will come to realize more as time goes on.

My daughter, the daddy's girl she is, has ridden with me on both days. She is riding the Wally-World bike that I patched back together, and having a tough go of it. After yesterdays ride, she came home nauseous and exhausted, more so than I. I told her we could shop for her a bike, but she says that she is fine with the bike she has.

As I read more about my particular model of bike, I find that the Revo shift handles that I have are not popular at all with seasoned riders. I am on the fence at the moment as I have not ridden the bike long enough to make a clear assessment, but so far they work perfectly as designed. As for me, the bike is doing everything I have asked from a bike. It is a comfort hybrid, designed with fitness in mind, or the commute, lets see where I am at in a couple few months.
 

Kallahan11

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People don't like revo shifters because on mountain bike trails you can accidentally shift with all the bumping around, as such there are no high end revo style shifters as they don't work on drop bars either. The revo shifter on my walmart bike was the one part I didn't have trouble with, if you like it and it's comfortable to use don't worry about what other people think.
 

DRAGON64

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People don't like revo shifters because on mountain bike trails you can accidentally shift with all the bumping around, as such there are no high end revo style shifters as they don't work on drop bars either. The revo shifter on my walmart bike was the one part I didn't have trouble with, if you like it and it's comfortable to use don't worry about what other people think.
I am not caring so much about what other people think, just trying to find out if they are reporting any problems with the shifters. And so far I have found none. Again, making my own assessments here, and only time will tell. I did find a comment buried in a bike forum, where a rider said the Revo shifters should outlawed... he provided no info to back his statement.
 
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