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  1. #1
    Join Date
    2nd February 2010
    Location
    Watertown, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,563

    My Best Recovery Ever.

    Power Line Retrival - 'How-to'


    I launched (and lost) my Executioner on an F39 the previous evening. Searched for hours on Saturday and resumed the search on Sunday.

    Long story short, I received a phone call that 'Mall Security' had located my rocket, hanging over a power line behind the 'Gap' store....

    This is how I got my rocket off of a Live Power Line.....

    This should be a Sticky......



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNLyT0ImO7U


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWfb_lwhklI

    You didn't think I was going to get it down, did you?

    I made one phone call to the Electric Company.

    Jeff Schubert
    Watertown, WI

  2. #2
    Join Date
    21st April 2010
    Location
    So central WI, USA
    Posts
    5,526
    Sticky please. note the power lines where I'm at carry 7200volts...I may be stupid enough to get something caught on them, but I'm not stupid enough to try and get them down myself.
    rex


  3. #3
    Join Date
    26th January 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    13,540
    Did the electric company charge you to retrieve it? I've heard some do.
    NAR 91107, Level 2

    I really, really hate bugs.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    20th January 2009
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,654
    Funny how theyre always in the last place you look. Hopefully you wont get a bill on your next statement.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    2nd February 2010
    Location
    Watertown, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,563
    No, no charge. (I asked before they came out)

    I called the 'Emergency and Power Outage' number, explained my name was Tim Lehr, and told them the situation....

    No, but seriously, anything caught on a power line is considered a hazard by the Electric Company, and they will get it down.

    They arrived in less than 45 minutes, on a Sunday.
    Jeff Schubert
    Watertown, WI

  6. #6
    Join Date
    30th January 2009
    Posts
    2,379
    I know all about landing in the power lines. My L3 flight landed in a set about a mile away. A single call to the power company got my rocket back.
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    Nick DeBrita
    Active Duty Navy Chief
    NAR #81410 L3 TRA #12809 L3

  7. #7
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
    Location
    Virginia - Central
    Posts
    4,185
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketman248 View Post
    I know all about landing in the power lines. My L3 flight landed in a set about a mile away. A single call to the power company got my rocket back.
    What did it cost ya?
    We got two categories of pilots around here. We got your prime pilots that get all the hot planes, and we got your pud-knockers who DREAM about getting the hot planes.
    Now what are you two pud-knockers gonna have?... Huh?”
    Pancho Barnes-
    The Right Stuff
    http://www.mwavs.com/0053148414/M4RS...udknockers.m4r

    Tripoli #2747

  8. #8
    Join Date
    30th January 2009
    Posts
    2,379
    They wouldn't take any sort of payment, so everyone that got rockets stuck in the power lines put in a donation to the Susan G. Komen Foundation in the company's name.
    Nick DeBrita
    Active Duty Navy Chief
    NAR #81410 L3 TRA #12809 L3

  9. #9
    Join Date
    26th January 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    13,540
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketman248 View Post
    They wouldn't take any sort of payment, so everyone that got rockets stuck in the power lines put in a donation to the Susan G. Komen Foundation in the company's name.
    Now that is cool.
    NAR 91107, Level 2

    I really, really hate bugs.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    3,876
    Ahhh yes...power lines


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTUi5B2HHog

    -Dave
    Dave Brunsting | NAR 85879 | TRA 12369
    L1 - 11/04/07, Three Oaks, MI | L2 - 7/25/09, Muskegon, MI
    Michiana Rocketry
    Notre Dame Rocket Team Mentor

  11. #11
    Join Date
    20th February 2009
    Location
    Cayuga, Indiana
    Posts
    12,882
    Although I would not recommend it, I actually did perform a power line recovery at Midwest Power last year. I believe Eric Cayemburg or Justin Farrand posted some "in progress" pics (5.5" blue/silver/red rocket) somewhere. I was getting coaching from a guy that said he was a former fireman. Although it was really tangled I did manage to get it back intact with only a small section of shock cord cut. Looking back, kinda stupid overall though.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    21st January 2009
    Posts
    1,104
    Quote Originally Posted by dixontj93060 View Post
    Although I would not recommend it, I actually did perform a power line recovery at Midwest Power last year. I believe Eric Cayemburg or Justin Farrand posted some "in progress" pics (5.5" blue/silver/red rocket) somewhere. I was getting coaching from a guy that said he was a former fireman. Although it was really tangled I did manage to get it back intact with only a small section of shock cord cut. Looking back, kinda stupid overall though.
    Maybe you didn't notice at the time, but there were several of us watching you from a safe distance with phones in hand, fingers on the "9", ready to go. I was expecting sparks and a flash at any moment.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
    Location
    Back up in the woods
    Posts
    8,212
    A popular member of this forum lost his life last year when he tried to retrieve his rocket from a power line. Reading about that just a day or so after having traded posts with him here on the forum makes the danger no longer seem so hypothetical. You will never get me to go near a rocket that is hung up on a power line. If your rocket is so valuable that you can't afford to lose it, then you can't afford to launch it.
    Mark S. Kulka NAR 86134 L1, ASTRE 471, Adirondack Mtns., NY
    Opinions Unfettered by Logic • Advice Unsullied by Erudition • Rocketry Without Pity
    In the forest no one can hear you order a grande caffè misto.
    Warning: I brake for invisible squirrels

  14. #14
    Join Date
    5th March 2011
    Location
    indiana
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkII View Post
    A popular member of this forum lost his life last year when he tried to retrieve his rocket from a power line. Reading about that just a day or so after having traded posts with him here on the forum makes the danger no longer seem so hypothetical. You will never get me to go near a rocket that is hung up on a power line. If your rocket is so valuable that you can't afford to lose it, then you can't afford to launch it.
    Well said. It's just not worth it. Call the electric Co.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    22nd June 2011
    Location
    Saginaw, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    538
    That's cool they didn't charge you. I'm sure our power company would. Apparently they don't think junk on the lines is a hazard, I can think of several locations where there are shoes and branches on the lines that have been there for years.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    26th January 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    13,540
    Quote Originally Posted by pick1e View Post
    That's cool they didn't charge you. I'm sure our power company would. Apparently they don't think junk on the lines is a hazard, I can think of several locations where there are shoes and branches on the lines that have been there for years.
    In the city where I live, shoes hanging on power lines can be a gang message of some sort. Not sure what the message is, though.
    NAR 91107, Level 2

    I really, really hate bugs.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    28th November 2010
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by qquake2k View Post
    In the city where I live, shoes hanging on power lines can be a gang message of some sort. Not sure what the message is, though.
    I think the message is that they got some new shoes and they had to show off in the most destructive way you can when getting new shoes.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
    Location
    Back up in the woods
    Posts
    8,212
    They are used to mark territory, I believe. Certain brands of shoes are associated with certain gangs.
    Mark S. Kulka NAR 86134 L1, ASTRE 471, Adirondack Mtns., NY
    Opinions Unfettered by Logic • Advice Unsullied by Erudition • Rocketry Without Pity
    In the forest no one can hear you order a grande caffè misto.
    Warning: I brake for invisible squirrels

  19. #19
    Join Date
    26th January 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    13,540
    Quote Originally Posted by top150 View Post
    I think the message is that they got some new shoes and they had to show off in the most destructive way you can when getting new shoes.
    I think it would be more fun to destroy your old shoes with explosives, but that's just me.
    NAR 91107, Level 2

    I really, really hate bugs.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    26th January 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    13,540
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkII View Post
    They are used to mark territory, I believe. Certain brands of shoes are associated with certain gangs.
    Stupid gang bangers.
    NAR 91107, Level 2

    I really, really hate bugs.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    3rd July 2010
    Location
    Springfield, VA, USA
    Posts
    1,548
    Quote Originally Posted by qquake2k View Post
    I think it would be more fun to destroy your old shoes with explosives, but that's just me.
    Maybe add a motor mount and some fins?? Hmmm.....

    Loafer launches anyone?

    G.D.
    Gregg Discenza
    NAR# 91293
    Level 1
    "You're only young once, but you can be immature forever!"

  22. #22
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
    Location
    Back up in the woods
    Posts
    8,212
    Quote Originally Posted by gdiscenza View Post
    Maybe add a motor mount and some fins?? Hmmm.....

    Loafer launches anyone?

    G.D.
    How many lunches can you make with a Big Loafer?
    Mark S. Kulka NAR 86134 L1, ASTRE 471, Adirondack Mtns., NY
    Opinions Unfettered by Logic • Advice Unsullied by Erudition • Rocketry Without Pity
    In the forest no one can hear you order a grande caffè misto.
    Warning: I brake for invisible squirrels

  23. #23
    Join Date
    15th May 2009
    Location
    Northern Illinois Rocket Assembly and Test Facility (NIRATF)
    Posts
    1,975
    Quote Originally Posted by dixontj93060 View Post
    Although I would not recommend it, I actually did perform a power line recovery at Midwest Power last year.
    The "Power" of Midwest Power should actually stand for "Power Lines". Not an uncommon occurrence. My fear now is dropping one on a wind turbine. They are getting closer.
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    Proud member of WOOSH, FVR, IR, QCRS, (RC)2
    2013 APCP: 48,397.3 Ns (18% P)
    Highest altitude achieved: 21,981' AGL

    "Gravity is a cruel and unpredictable mistress"

  24. #24
    Join Date
    6th September 2009
    Posts
    1,819
    Quote Originally Posted by SMR View Post
    My fear now is dropping one on a wind turbine. They are getting closer.
    At the risk of hijacking this thread into an environmental argument, wind turbines are yet another threat to our open spaces of beauty and rocket enjoyment.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    13th May 2012
    Posts
    1,254
    Excuse my ignorance gentlemen, and maybe this is just on these large rockets...but why is the shock cords so long?

  26. #26
    Join Date
    26th January 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    13,540
    Quote Originally Posted by closet astronaut View Post
    Excuse my ignorance gentlemen, and maybe this is just on these large rockets...but why is the shock cords so long?
    On mid and high power rockets, we generally use Kevlar or nylon webbing for shock cords, for their strength. They're so long to be able to absorb the shock of the chute opening suddenly, without causing damage to the airframe. With elastic shock cords or lighter rockets, it's not as much of an issue.
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    NAR 91107, Level 2

    I really, really hate bugs.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    13th May 2012
    Posts
    1,254
    So it's just on the big boys. I also notice the chute isn't connected to the cone but attached about midway down the shock cord.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    26th January 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    13,540
    Quote Originally Posted by closet astronaut View Post
    So it's just on the big boys. I also notice the chute isn't connected to the cone but attached about midway down the shock cord.
    Well, the small rocket in the first photo has 5oz of weight in the nose cone. It's pretty heavy. In the last photo, it's a zipperless design, so it breaks in the middle. There's a lot of weight in the upper section. As for the middle photo, my LOC IV, I think it just looks better.
    NAR 91107, Level 2

    I really, really hate bugs.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
    Location
    Oviedo, FL
    Posts
    5,253
    Quote Originally Posted by closet astronaut View Post
    Excuse my ignorance gentlemen, and maybe this is just on these large rockets...but why is the shock cords so long?
    They are long to allow drag to slow the relative speed of the parts after ejection so that there isn't a big shock for the shock cord to absorb.

    Some use the idea for small rockets, also, by replacing the elastic shock cord with a longer length of Kevlar string. Thin Kevlar, though, can easily cut through a body tube, causing a "zipper" if the 'chute doesn't deploy at the right time. For that reason I prefer old fashioned "rubber band" or "underwear elastic" shock cords for small rockets. But. sometimes I'll use Kevlar string or Kevlar string attached to an elastic shock cord.

    -- Roger

  30. #30
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
    Posts
    671
    I remember seeing someone at NSL 2007 - standing on top of their car - trying to grab their rocket hanging from the high voltage transmission lines running near the field. Their ~8 year old kid watching from the ground nearby.


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