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  1. #1
    Join Date
    21st January 2009
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    Loc N-Load Build Thread

    History: There’s always a story! As a young'n, I always ooogled over the Loc ads in the HPR magazines; a favorite being the “Loc Custom Engineering” offerings with the impressive photo of Ron Schultz dwarfed by his biggest creations! I know I’m not alone in this!

    It seemed as if the K-Load was always the obscure one. The Esoteric, Top Gun, and Mother Lode gathered a lot of attention and flight time, the V-2 and Ultimate Max had their share of fanfare, and the King Viper III remains a noteworthy cluster to this day. But you didn’t hear much about the K-Load. Designed for the “coffee can K”, or Aerotech K458 White Lightning, the 'Load featured a 98mm mount and holds claim to being the first airframe to fly a 98mm K motor in 1987. Nevertheless, you didn’t see many out in the wild; and the fin design was always a bit of a mystery as it was buried in the grass at Longwood Park.

    Fast forward a bit... a sequence of events took place that made NOW the time for the re-emergence of the K-Load. Jason Blatzheim started a K-Load L3 project, Nik Byra put the K-Load in the build que, and Glen put the idea of recreating the lineup of Custom Classics into my deranged head. Thus the K-Load was on the radar, but not yet on the workbench. Then a photo of Mark Coburn with his K-Load appeared in 2017 GLRMR Launch Report, and I thought, Hey, I really like those fins…that’s a good looking rocket! Conversation ensued with Mark, another with Dr. Reese at MWP, a deal on 98mm grunt surfaced, and the Loc crew said “let’s build something”. Thus, the K-Load GT, or the M-Load was born. Except Dave kept talking about the N1000. After sleeping on it, and with a few tweaks, the Loc N-Load is the result!

    The challenge at hand. (Re) Create the K-Load with the same external dimensions, making it strong enough to handle N motors, light enough to fly on the K458 as intended with the original, without using an ounce of glass, all while incorporating modern dual deploy technology. Furthermore, be able to easily transform from the K-Load to the N-Load in a few short minutes simply by swapping nosecones and adding/removing a boat tail. Do it on a budget, make the rocket worthy of, say an M2500T and an N1000W without the use of any exotic components or tools.

    For those that aren’t aware, the original Doc of Loc, Ron Schultz passed away recently. Ron was a pioneer of High Power Rocketry. Much of the growth and advancement in the early years in the 80’s and 90’s involved Ron and Debbie’s work. We wouldn’t be where we are today without his contributions in the glory days!!! This build is a tribute to Ron; I think he’ll like it! Except for putting an N in a 5.5” bird, he would never advise such a combo!

    Mach Diamonds and Blue Skies, Ron!

    [IMG]RonRetroKits by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    And Go!

    Last edited by ECayemberg; 22nd November 2017 at 12:11 AM. Reason: Hmmm: Flickr Uploads?!?!?!
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  2. #2
    Join Date
    26th May 2011
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    CA
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    Yes!! That's a very nice tribute to Ron.


  3. #3
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    21st January 2009
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    E-Bay Assembly

    In order to take the K-Load to the next level, we're going to run couplers the full length of the airframe. Doing so strengthens the airframe, and gives the components two shelves or steps to rest against for double-support. For this to work, and for the internals to form one contiguous structure on the inside of the airframe, attention has to be paid to the sequence of assembly. Difficult: NO, Have to pay a bit of attention: YES!

    That said, we start with assembly of the Electronics Bay. Main components include an 11" tube coupler, 10.5" Stiffy, two 1/4" thick coupler bulkplates, and some steel hardware. First, we secure the eyebolts to the bulkplates. Use some threadlocker and tighten 'em up!

    [IMG]20171117_160114 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Next, we prepare to epoxy the Stiffy into the Tube Coupler. Mid-cure epoxy (12-15 minute) is used in this and many other steps during construction. We won't debate epoxy here, though.

    [IMG]20171117_160646 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    A sizeable batch of epoxy is mixed and applied uniformly to the inside of the Tube Coupler. The Stiffy is inserted into the Tube Coupler until recessed evenly from both ends. Excess epoxy is wiped off the exposed ends of the Coupler.

    [IMG]20171117_162221 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Using the excess epoxy you plowed forward with your Stiffy, secure the Forward Bulk Plate in place. It fits inside the Tube Coupler, butts directly onto the Stiffy coupler. The end of the Bulk Plate should sit flush or slightly recessed from the end of the Tube Coupler.

    [IMG]20171117_162213 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Set aside for the epoxy to cure, being careful that the Bulk Plate and Stiffy stay positioned within the Tube Coupler as intended.
    Last edited by ECayemberg; 22nd November 2017 at 01:04 AM.
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeRoc29 View Post
    Yes!! That's a very nice tribute to Ron.
    Oh Derek, you're gonna like this one, buddy!
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  5. #5
    Join Date
    4th July 2015
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    London, UK
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    This is going to be a thread to savour. Love the detailed write up on both the general history and what it meant to you personally, plus the tribute to Ron Schultz.
    You are a gentleman and a scholar, sir!
    UKRA #1895
    EARS #1329
    L1 6/9/15 Custom built LOC Fantom 438 CTI H125
    L2 3/4/16 Same custom built LOC Fantom w/ DD EXL configuration CTI J410

  6. #6
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    21st January 2009
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    Main Chute Tube Assembly

    Though most of us tend to build from the bottom of the rocket up, we're going to build this one from the top down. With the continuous double walled coupler construction, positioning starts most practically at the nose cone shoulder.

    Performing a quick check, we find that the shoulder of the Loc PNC-5.54L cone is about 4.5" long.

    [IMG]20171117_162518 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Make several marks 5" from the end of one end of the Main Chute Tube around the ID circumference.

    [IMG]20171117_162544 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    A 10" long Tube Coupler will be epoxied into the Main Chute Tube beginning at the 5" mark(s).

    [IMG]20171117_163011 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Apply a uniform layer of epoxy to the inside of the Main Chute Tube, BELOW the 5" marks, and down another 9" or so (5" to 14" from the front/top end).

    [IMG]20171117_163213 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Slide the coupler in from the front/top (nosecone) end.

    [IMG]20171117_163224 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    But don't stop there! Keep 'er moovin! Use the nosecone to push the coupler into the tube fully in one smooth motion.

    [IMG]20171117_163242 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Keep pushing until the nosecone is fully seated on the top of the airframe.

    [IMG]20171117_163534 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Using a scraper device, remove any excess epoxy that was "pushed" onto the tube by the installation of the coupler. Use a bit of alcohol to clean up the epoxy.

    [IMG]20171117_163506 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    I like to use these re-useable plastic sticks from West Systems. When dry, you flex the stick and the cured epoxy flakes off. One of those: can't live without *thingies* in my shop.

    [IMG]20171117_163421 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Perform a quick check to ensure that no epoxy is in the "X-Zone". Your nosecone shoulder needs to occupy this space, so we want to keep it epoxy-glob free!

    [IMG]20171117_163519 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Set aside the Main Chute Tube/Coupler assembly to cure; lay the assembly down horizontally. Since you set the depth of the 10" coupler just right, you wouldn't want gravity to slide it out of position!
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim51 View Post
    This is going to be a thread to savour. Love the detailed write up on both the general history and what it meant to you personally, plus the tribute to Ron Schultz.
    You are a gentleman and a scholar, sir!
    Thank you so much, Tim! Thrilled to have you here and appreciate the comments greatly!
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  8. #8
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    Main Chute Tube Assembly Part II

    Let's do a bit more "work" tonight.

    Loc 3.0 is pretty stealthy with their equipment. Lots of laser cutting and CNC routered materials flowing out of 'Sconsin nowadays.

    The ends of the cardboard tubes benefit from a small amount of TLC to get them "just right" and ensure they last for many flights. One end of the Main Chute Tube was laser cut; super straight but left with little ridges on the end of the tube.

    [IMG]20171118_072535 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    No worries; the ridges are quickly leveled with a sanding block and paper. Both ends of this tube benefit from the application of Thin CA. This application seals the ends of the tube from moisture, delamination, prevents peeling, and hardens the surface substantially.

    [IMG]20171118_072944 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    You'll notice the difference of the color when the CA soaks in. I prefer to go around the ends of the tubes twice.

    [IMG]20171118_073250 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    All soaked in, the end of the tube looks like this. After the CA cures for a few minutes, I like to sand the ends with a block and 220 grit paper.

    [IMG]20171118_073250 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Epoxy Ebay into Main Chute Tube

    Note: Many rocket dudes and dudettes choose to have a fully removable E-bay that is affixed in place using rivets, screws, pins, or otherwise. I too have a few rockets set up this way. With the relatively short (20") Main Chute Tube, I haven't found it advantageous to have a removable bay; in fact I find it simpler with less parts and easy access to simply epoxy ONE END of the Ebay coupler in place (the other side does indeed get screwed in place).

    Prepare to epoxy the Electronics Bay (assembled previously) into the Main Chute Tube. Use a tack cloth to remove any dust from the surfaces to be bonded.

    [IMG]20171118_074329 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Butter the inside of the Bottom/Aft end of the Main Chute Tube, from the edge forward to the 10" coupler previously epoxied in place.

    [IMG]20171118_074712 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Line 'em up and Slide it in! Fixed bulkplate faces forward/up/towards the nosecone!

    [IMG]20171118_074735 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Slide the Ebay in until it bumps into the 10" coupler previously epoxied in place. If desired, clean up the epoxy on the forward end of the Ebay creating a fillet *Note: non-essential step that does nothing for the functionality of the rocket...but if you're OCD....just sayin'* Looking down from the forward (nosecone) end, we see the E-bay is playing bump and grind with the 10" coupler.

    [IMG]20171118_074953 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Stand upright on the E-bay until epoxy cures. Let gravity do it's thing.

    [IMG]20171118_075013 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Last edited by ECayemberg; 22nd November 2017 at 12:55 AM.
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  9. #9
    Join Date
    19th January 2009
    Posts
    3,394
    Note the original K-Load came out before there were any reloads. Reloads were introduced in 1990. The rocket also used the short nose cone, the only 5.5" cone at the time. It was designed for the single use K125 (about 18 sec burn). There were also L250 and M500 motors available. I wish Aerotech would bring back more of the old motors. The K125 became the K170 when burn time was limited to 15 seconds. Also, the rocket was designed for motor ejection so it could be built under 6 lb. (No electronics then either.)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    26th January 2009
    Location
    LAX
    Posts
    3,152


    Coffee Can is the colloquial term, but after much studying, I've come to the conclusion that it's more like something else...



    Tell the LOC boys I'm ready!
    David Reese
    TRA 5590 TAP / NAR 64125
    http://davidree.se / http://www.wildmanwest.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    4th July 2015
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    London, UK
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    I tend to agree with the initial conclusions of your study, and I approve of your research methodology, but would suggest you may need to substantiate your thesis with a bigger bottle...particularly when your findings get to peer review stage... *hic*..
    UKRA #1895
    EARS #1329
    L1 6/9/15 Custom built LOC Fantom 438 CTI H125
    L2 3/4/16 Same custom built LOC Fantom w/ DD EXL configuration CTI J410

  12. #12
    Join Date
    6th December 2013
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    TX
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    2,240
    Quote Originally Posted by ECayemberg View Post
    It seemed as if the K-Load was always the obscure one. The Esoteric, Top Gun, and Mother Lode gathered a lot of attention and flight time, the V-2 and Ultimate Max had their share of fanfare, and the King Viper III remains a noteworthy cluster to this day. But you didn’t hear much about the K-Load. Designed for the “coffee can K”, or Aerotech K458 White Lightning, the 'Load featured a 98mm mount and holds claim to being the first airframe to fly a 98mm K motor in 1987. Nevertheless, you didn’t see many out in the wild; and the fin design was always a bit of a mystery as it was buried in the grass at Longwood Park.
    That's pretty much been my thoughts as well. Very nice summary.

    The Fastest and Most Reliable and Transparent Way to Buy High Power Rocket Motors

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  13. #13
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    18th June 2014
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    112
    Quote Originally Posted by ECayemberg View Post
    Epoxy Ebay into Main Chute Tube

    Note: Many rocket dudes and dudettes choose to have a fully removable E-bay that is affixed in place using rivets, screws, pins, or otherwise. I too have a few rockets set up this way. With the relatively short (20") Main Chute Tube, I haven't found it advantageous to have a removable bay; in fact I find it simpler with less parts and easy access to simply epoxy ONE END of the Ebay coupler in place (the other side does indeed get screwed in place).

    Prepare to epoxy the Electronics Bay (assembled previously) into the Main Chute Tube. Use a tack cloth to remove any dust from the surfaces to be bonded.
    This is a timely build that should give me some ideas on putting together my Big Nuke 3E. I was going to secure the ebay with some screws, but this looks like a cleaner way to set it up. I'm interested to see how you'll setup the separation charges through the bulkhead.

    cheers - mark

  14. #14
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    30th April 2012
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    St. Louis, MO.
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    654
    wha... wha... old school build methods? AWESOME.

    I build my Hi-Tech in the same manner. Flew it on H, I, and made my way up to the final flight on a J570... with a "surprise" delay by AT. Bummer. Wildman sure liked that one though.
    Mike Walsh
    NAR L3 - 07/27/2013

  15. #15
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    21st January 2009
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    Manitowoc, WI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketjunkie View Post
    Note the original K-Load came out before there were any reloads. Reloads were introduced in 1990. The rocket also used the short nose cone, the only 5.5" cone at the time. It was designed for the single use K125 (about 18 sec burn). There were also L250 and M500 motors available. I wish Aerotech would bring back more of the old motors. The K125 became the K170 when burn time was limited to 15 seconds. Also, the rocket was designed for motor ejection so it could be built under 6 lb. (No electronics then either.)
    Hi Tom;thanks for stopping by! Love the old school single use motors! Indeed, the K-Load design preceeded the RMS system...I guess I always associate the K-Load with the K458 as it was a recommended motor from Ron. I think buddy Nik has a K125 in his stash. Was just reading an old Tripolitan that covered Black Rock I or II...Binford Cloudbusters on Vulcan O's!!!!

    I love how Loc rockets past and present can be built so light; that is my main attraction to the construction methodology. Plus I enjoy working with the stuff! Some of my favorite flights have been Magnums on long burning motors...they almost hover off the pad, but always fly straight and true. Hoping the same for this one!

    Per the "Goals" note, the intent is to maintain the same external dimensions as the original K-Load while adding the amenities of modern high power rocketry...plus having the option of add-ons to make the K-Load a "GT" model, or N-Load with the simple addition of a removable boat tail and a swap for the sleaker Long nose cone. Fly it on the coffee can K, fly it on the M2500 for a good kick in the pants, and fly it on the N1000 to see how high we can shove a 5.5" airframe! Can't wait!

    Quote Originally Posted by daveyfire View Post


    Coffee Can is the colloquial term, but after much studying, I've come to the conclusion that it's more like something else...



    Tell the LOC boys I'm ready!
    Will do, David! YES! Was hoping you'd catch the GT reference! Drain the bottle, invert, and light the fumes: GT Propulsion!

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim51 View Post
    I tend to agree with the initial conclusions of your study, and I approve of your research methodology, but would suggest you may need to substantiate your thesis with a bigger bottle...particularly when your findings get to peer review stage... *hic*..
    Proud to have studied alongside Dr. Reese.

    ....Once or twice a year....

    ...Double GT's with a squeeze a lime...

    ...That poor dude that attempted to tend bar at MWP this year...


    Quote Originally Posted by markg View Post
    This is a timely build that should give me some ideas on putting together my Big Nuke 3E. I was going to secure the ebay with some screws, but this looks like a cleaner way to set it up. I'm interested to see how you'll setup the separation charges through the bulkhead.

    cheers - mark
    Hi Mark!

    Yessir; Big Nukes are great as well! You'll get the best of both worlds on this build. I glue one half in, and secure the other side with screws. Assuming a Stiffy coupler is used, I just Drill and Tap for #6-32 screws, soak the area in thin CA, and call it good!

    I just run the charges straight through a 5/32" hole I drill in the bulkplate; the charges get wired directly to the altimeters. Less connections= less failure points, in my opinion. I loop the wires inside the e-bay so if the wires are yanked, they do not yank on the altimeter's screw terminals. The hole gets sealed by covering the wire/thru hole with masking tape or a small chunk of clay.

    Quote Originally Posted by pyrobob View Post
    That's pretty much been my thoughts as well. Very nice summary.
    Hi Bob, Happy to have you here! Many thanks...the timing on this project just feels right. Though I really was hoping to make it to a launch in Ohio in 2018 and have Ron there with a few familiar faces from the past.

    Quote Originally Posted by mrwalsh85 View Post
    wha... wha... old school build methods? AWESOME.

    I build my Hi-Tech in the same manner. Flew it on H, I, and made my way up to the final flight on a J570... with a "surprise" delay by AT. Bummer. Wildman sure liked that one though.
    Love it Mike! Wooh, I'd expect a Vulcanite to hand the '570, but the thinner walled Hi-Tech?!?! Ballsy...NICE!!!
    Last edited by ECayemberg; 22nd November 2017 at 06:24 PM.
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  16. #16
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    Well, I'm going to subscribe to this build thread!
    Looking good so far, Eric!

    Thanks,
    Andrew - 14 year old rocketeer who loves to watch and fly model rockets all year long!!!
    2018 - 46.02 Ns _ Biggest motor, CTI G106, highest flight around 3,500' - TRA Member #17056
    Owner, Andrew's Rocketry Shop - andrewsrocketryshop.blogspot.com

  17. #17
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    Drogue Chute Tube Assembly

    With the Main Chute Tube epoxied together, it's time to move aft along the rocket's airframe.

    Assembly of the Drogue Chute Tube is straightforward and strikingly similar to that of the Main Chute Tube, only
    A) the E-bay coupler is used to set the location of the coupler to be epoxied (instead of the nosecone), and
    B) The Tube will eventually be secured to the E-bay coupler using #6-32 screws. Screws, not glues!

    A 10" coupler will be epoxied into the 20" long Drogue Chute Tube. This gives you an idea of the arrangement.

    [IMG]20171118_082042 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    As a checker, we find that approximately 4.625" of E-bay coupler extends into the Drogue Chute Tube. The 10" coupler to be epoxied butts up against this coupler.

    [IMG]20171118_082241 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Seeing how the 10" coupler is to be epoxied from ~4.75" to ~14.75" from the forward end of the tube, we once again make several marks around the inside circumference of the Drogue Chute Tube 5" and 14" down from the forward end.

    [IMG]20171118_082313 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Butter epoxy between the marks. Yum....I love butter!

    [IMG]20171118_083032 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Slide the 10" coupler into the Drogue Chute Tube from the FORWARD END, then slide together with the Main Chute Tube. The roughly 4.625" exposed end of the E-bay coupler will push the 10" coupler into place. Remember, we're going to Screw the lower half of the E-bay to the Drogue Chute Tube, so no getting glue there!

    [IMG]20171118_083312 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Slide the two tubes together, making sure they fully seat. Clean up any excess epoxy on the aft end of the 10" coupler, and let the assembly cure horizontally.

    [IMG]20171118_083411 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Looking forward from the Aft end of the Drogue Chute Tube, you get this lovely view. Roughly 5.375" of "open tube" will be left for the coupler that bridges the gap to the Booster Tube.

    [IMG]20171118_083604 by ECayemberg, on Flickr[/IMG]

    With the exception of a few holes to be drilled, this completes assembly of the two upper airframe sections. It may begin to become apparent that the layout is of the "Zipperless" design variety.

    On to more exciting assembly and epoxification of interesting appendages forthcoming shortly!
    Last edited by ECayemberg; 22nd November 2017 at 09:23 PM.
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  18. #18
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    I like big cardboard rockets !

  19. #19
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    11th October 2016
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    Can’t wait to see how this one turns out and then have the ability to purchase the kit! Just like Eric I remember starring at those adds and at the time not being able to afford any of them. Now the K/n load is the only one I need to complete the collection


    Sent from my iPhone using Rocketry Forum

  20. #20
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    23rd November 2016
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    It was Charlie and Chris's fault I fell in love with that N-1000.... Good times at airfest!!!
    Get Up There!!!


    www.locprecision.com
    Dave@locprecision
    920-892-0557

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ECayemberg View Post
    Love it Mike! Wooh, I'd expect a Vulcanite to hand the '570, but the thinner walled Hi-Tech?!?! Ballsy...NICE!!!
    on J350

    on J570 -- you can see it took a sudden right turn right before or around burnout. I think this was the AT Bonus delay. AT replaced the motor. The rocket was a complete loss. Ah well. It was fun while it lasted. Maybe I'll do another one someday.
    Mike Walsh
    NAR L3 - 07/27/2013

  22. #22
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    Quite a timely thread as I begin finalizing the logistics for my 5.5" Loc Cruiser L2!
    "I'm at least 70% confident about whatever I say (90% of the time)"- college me

    NAR 101195
    Level 1: Big SAM, 9/10/16

  23. #23
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    21st January 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nytrunner View Post
    Quite a timely thread as I begin finalizing the logistics for my 5.5" Loc Cruiser L2!
    Excellent! Very cool choice for your L2 as well!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by LOC View Post
    It was Charlie and Chris's fault I fell in love with that N-1000.... Good times at airfest!!!
    Great times at Airfest! I have too many enablers in my life. Trouble!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by wadavidson View Post
    Can’t wait to see how this one turns out and then have the ability to purchase the kit! Just like Eric I remember starring at those adds and at the time not being able to afford any of them. Now the K/n load is the only one I need to complete the collection
    Thanks Bill! See, now it's my turn to be an enabler! Awesome, man!

    Quote Originally Posted by samb View Post
    I like big cardboard rockets !
    Yessir! Don't get me wrong, I like glass rockets as well and have my fair share of them. The 5.54" size is just a happy place for cardboard airframes in my opinion. Big enough to be impressive, strong enough to take some hearty loads, and light enough to majestically display the finest long burners out there. Definitely a sweet spot!

    Quote Originally Posted by mrwalsh85 View Post
    on J350
    Nice, Mike!!! Nice boost! Bummer to hear that she didn't survive the J570 for whatever reason....gives an OPPORTUNITY to build a new one (or something else). Always gotta look on the bright side!
    Last edited by ECayemberg; 28th November 2017 at 09:26 PM.
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  24. #24
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    21st January 2009
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    Build-A-Boat

    One of the main goals stated earlier is to make a single airframe that is both a faithful external shell of the classic K-Load while also being “easily” tranfsformed into an "N" motor holder. The two main visible/exterior differences are the PNC-5.54Long cone and a new product coming out of the Wonka Factory...errr Loc 3.0 Plant: a Build-a-boat tail! One of those items you have to play with to truly appreciate, this next segment is a fun one; I've enjoyed building this tail...and it's kinda sexy!

    Parts

    The basic parts of the Boat are pictured below and consist of a lasered stiffy with relief cuts, 6" length of 98mm Heavy Motor Mount tube, 1" length of 5.5" Coupler, and a 1/4" thick 5.5-4" Centering Ring.

    [IMG]20171119_084833[/IMG]

    The Stiffy is trimmed 1-1/4" above the scribed line around the OD. This step may be done for you already in the production version....

    [IMG]20171118_203022 [/IMG]

    In order to get a better fit of the base of the cone to the aft end of the 6" motor tube, I scored the ID of the Stiffy about an inch up from the end. Then peeled roughly half the thickness out of the ID.

    [IMG]20171119_085803[/IMG]

    Scrappy!

    [IMG]20171119_084316[/IMG]

    A quick dry fit to make sure it all fits together is in order:

    [IMG]20171119_084330 [/IMG]

    Epoxification

    Let's glue this tail together! Start by epoxying the 1" coupler ring flush with the top of the Stiffy tail. The ends of the Stiffy and the coupler should be flush with one-another.

    [IMG]20171119_093324[/IMG]

    Peel the 6" length of 98mm motor tube, or otherwise rough it up.

    [IMG]20171119_093451 [/IMG]

    Mix up a medium sized batch of epoxy. One of my favorites for general rocket construction is West 105/205 filled first with a bit of milled glass fibers and then thickened as desired with colloidal/fumed silica.

    [IMG]20171119_093835 [/IMG]

    Apply the epoxy blend to the "fingers" of the tail that need to be unified as one!

    [IMG]20171119_094407 [/IMG]

    Install the motor tube inside the Stiffy tail. Use a rubber band to close the fingers around the motor tube. Position the aft end of the motor tube flush with the bottom of the newly formed tail cone.

    Apply a ring of epoxy in two places: around the top rim of the Stiffy/Coupler ring and around the OD of the top end of the motor tube.

    [IMG]20171119_095133 [/IMG]

    Slide the centering ring down onto the epoxy.

    [IMG]20171119_095157[/IMG]

    Epoxy will have oozed out of a few places. Thus, it is smart to work on top of a piece of wax paper or similar. Clean up any renegade epoxy with alcohol.

    [IMG]20171119_095831 [/IMG]

    Let your boat dry! The resulting structure is lightweight and strong-like-ox. For the OCD like myself, it will use a bit of filler, but this thing came out nicely!
    Last edited by ECayemberg; 28th November 2017 at 09:27 PM.
    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

  25. #25
    Join Date
    31st May 2017
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    145
    Wow that looks awesome, very clever too! I love watching your big LOC builds - fiberglass is fun but cardboard is a classic!
    TRA #17256
    Tripoli Houston
    L1 - 7/8/17

  26. #26
    Join Date
    26th February 2017
    Posts
    42


    Very nice! There seems to be the potential for a lot more artistry potential is manipulating cardboard than fiber glass.
    NAR #102778
    L1 - 4/7/17 - Loc IV H123W, LDRS36

  27. #27
    Join Date
    26th May 2011
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    780
    Whoah, the K-Load had a tail cone??

  28. #28
    Join Date
    15th October 2016
    Location
    Huntsville AL
    Posts
    1,874
    Is that build a Boattail a custom thing or just part of the "kit"?

  29. #29
    Join Date
    4th July 2015
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    406
    Very nice - you say this is a new product from LOC 3.0 - any idea as to when this will be generally available? And I'm presuming / hoping it could also be adapted as a 5.54 > 4 " transition...?
    UKRA #1895
    EARS #1329
    L1 6/9/15 Custom built LOC Fantom 438 CTI H125
    L2 3/4/16 Same custom built LOC Fantom w/ DD EXL configuration CTI J410

  30. #30
    Join Date
    21st January 2009
    Location
    Manitowoc, WI
    Posts
    2,219
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim51 View Post
    Very nice - you say this is a new product from LOC 3.0 - any idea as to when this will be generally available? And I'm presuming / hoping it could also be adapted as a 5.54 > 4 " transition...?
    Tim, great insight! 'Tis true that this concept can be used as a transition; watch for that application in the future! Availability...I suspect it is *available* right now by contacting Loc. The boat tails and other products are part of the Loc Custom Series coming soon....

    Quote Originally Posted by Nytrunner View Post
    Is that build a Boattail a custom thing or just part of the "kit"?
    INCLUDED! Part of the Loc N-Load kit!

    Quote Originally Posted by viciouspeanut View Post
    Wow that looks awesome, very clever too! I love watching your big LOC builds - fiberglass is fun but cardboard is a classic!
    Thanks VP! Totally agree; big cardboard makes me happy! All is copacetic!

    Quote Originally Posted by DeeRoc29 View Post
    Whoah, the K-Load had a tail cone??
    No tail cone on the K-Load. But the N-Load has it! Building mine to be removeable; can switch from a "K-Load" to an "N-Load by removing the tailcone and swapping nosecones in under a minute! More to come on that...

    Quote Originally Posted by BradMilkomeda View Post


    Very nice! There seems to be the potential for a lot more artistry potential is manipulating cardboard than fiber glass.
    Thanks Brad! It's a blast working on these big furry critters! Weight savings too...that's honestly my favorite part. 5.5" cardboard airframes on slow burning 75-3 grain motors is where it's at...but I'm thinking they'll be fun on 98-4G and 98-6G motors too!

    Eric Cayemberg
    TRA 7783 L3
    TAP

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