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  1. #1
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    Exclamation I am a 13 year old boy new to Model Rocketry. Which rocket should I buy?

    Hey ! I am a 13 y/o boy, expert in RC Flying, Arduino Programming and Shooting. I am new to model rocketry. What should I buy to get started.
    My engineering and electronic skills are Advanced and I even have a 3d Printer (wondering if I can 3d print rockets).


  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarvan View Post
    Hey ! I am a 13 y/o boy, expert in RC Flying, Arduino Programming and Shooting. I am new to model rocketry. What should I buy to get started.
    My engineering and electronic skills are Advanced and I even have a 3d Printer (wondering if I can 3d print rockets).
    Welcome!

    Contact Alex Boyce at Boyce Aerospace Hobbies, and get a copy of the files for the CinerocDV (free for the asking), then you can build a Semroc Omega (KV-64) and get started with a digital video camera rocket.

    What you'll end up with looks a lot like my avatar (not exactly, but very close)

    Dreaming of making the rockets I dreamed of as a kid (and then some).


    NAR L1 Cert flight: Sheridan, Oregon, USA. Sept. 19, 2015. Flew Deep Space OFFl on an I357T-14A Blue Thunder

  3. #3
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    21st April 2010
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    So central WI, USA
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    I would suggest asking your self whether you will be flying in a club type setting or strictly solo? there a few things that are needed to fly a rocket; a launch pad, and electrical launch system, as well as the rocket and motors. in a club type setting the pad and launch setup are usually provided or if with friends the use of can be arranged. solo you'll need to provide your own equipment. and you will need a suitable place to fly. at this point I would suggest finding a copy of 'The Handbook of Model Rocketry' by Stine. I will hazard a guess* that you might not have easy access to a rocket club, and recommend a starter set as they will provide the needed equipment and a rocket or two to get you started. from there you can branch out to the more advanced rockets knowing that you have the support equipment.
    Rex
    *might also guess you might want to fly electronic payloads in the near future .
    L2-competitor 3, AT J350W, 8/27/2016, Bong, 2557'
    my youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gB...?feature=watch

  4. #4
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    25th September 2017
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    Tripoli St., Pittsburgh, PA
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    Thanks a lot for the answers. Yes I will be flying solo. How 'bout 3d printing the rockets??

  5. #5
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    21st April 2010
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    So central WI, USA
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    it can and has been done but, you'll need something to shield the airframe from the heat of the motor/ejection charge else they may turn out to be single use rockets.
    Rex
    L2-competitor 3, AT J350W, 8/27/2016, Bong, 2557'
    my youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gB...?feature=watch

  6. #6
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
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    Southern Indiana
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    I would also suggest that you check the NAR website for the list of NAR chapters - flying solo is fine, but rocketry is a lot more fun when flying with friends. See if there is a chapter near you - most chapters welcome non-members to fly with them, and they will have a lot of experience you can draw upon.

    As fat as 3d printing rockets, I'd stick to printing nose cones and fin cans. You are best off using paper body tubes (as well as motor mounts, etc.) rather that printing the tube. There are quite a few nose cones and fin cans available on Thingiverse. Just do a search for "rocket" and you will find quite a few designs.
    Greg Poehlein

    Member of Launch Crue - http://launchcrue.org/

    Hint #1: Do not use magician's flash paper for recovery wadding!

    Hint #2: Clean your shoes after flyin' in that cow pasture - that ain't no dirt clod on the sole!

  7. #7
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    25th September 2017
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    Tripoli St., Pittsburgh, PA
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    Thanks a ton LV-2. I am so lonely, you guys and my dogs are the only living things I can talk to.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarvan View Post
    Thanks a ton LV-2. I am so lonely, you guys and my dogs are the only living things I can talk to.
    "LV-2" is actually "Rex R"... Just as I'm "K'Tesh" (and not "OpenRocket Chuck Norris").

    You'll get the hang of it quickly... And once again... Welcome!

    BTW, You're lucky... As an Aspie living and working in China, I can't even get the dogs to understand me
    Dreaming of making the rockets I dreamed of as a kid (and then some).


    NAR L1 Cert flight: Sheridan, Oregon, USA. Sept. 19, 2015. Flew Deep Space OFFl on an I357T-14A Blue Thunder

  9. #9
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    18th March 2012
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    Huntsville, AL
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    Welcome aboard! I was your age when I started on here. It's a fun place, you'll soon find that no one here bites. Except for the guy in the corner huffing AP fumes and muttering something about Black Saturday...

    Whereabouts are you located? If you let us know your general area, we can help you find a club that can help ya get started with rockets.

    Rockets are a really fun thing, and there's so many places you can go with it. Your electronics experience means you can have a lot of fun designing your own altimeters, GPS trackers, etc.

    If/When you get into high power, you'll find that your 3D printer is amazing for printing lots of little parts that would be a pain in the butt to design by hand.


    If you have any questions, feel free to message me!
    Matt, Tripoli #14257
    L1 11/13/16
    L2 2/25/17
    L3 Spring 2018....
    Facebook Youtube



  10. #10
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    30th January 2016
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    I don't know what you want to do, or how much you want to spend. But I can absolutely recommend the BMS School Rocket for an inexpensive way to dip toes in that covers all the basics.

  11. #11
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    1st July 2011
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    Pittsburgh, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhbarr View Post
    I don't know what you want to do, or how much you want to spend. But I can absolutely recommend the BMS School Rocket for an inexpensive way to dip toes in that covers all the basics.
    +1 There is a larger version too. 3in diameter.
    Kevin Wuchevich
    Tripoli Pittsburgh
    TRA 12238

  12. #12
    Join Date
    22nd August 2015
    Location
    Rhode Island
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    If you are wanting to fly by yourself, I suggest staring with an Estes starter set like this one. That's how most of us got started years ago. When you are ready to fly bigger rockets, I suggest another Estes Starter Set in their Pro Series II product line, specifically this one. Those sets have everything that you need to launch by yourself (except engines), and you can buy them from Estes directly, on Amazon.com, or even at Hobby Lobby. After that, just start building and launching any of the kits that have been suggested here. My 2 cents is to try something like this.

    And yes, you can definitely 3D print rocket parts. I am a noob to 3D printing, but many rocketeers do it.
    NAR #100940, RIMRA & CMASS
    L1 - 4/17/16, Tyrannosaur (by Binder Design), Loki H144
    L2 - 8/19/17, Terrordactyl (by Binder Design), CTI J250

  13. #13
    Join Date
    31st May 2011
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    San Diego, CA
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    Hello there & welcome , Zarvan !

    If you were to ask Wayco, he would probably suggest a Estes Mongoose..

    Save some $$ now and buy a Estes Mammoth on sale at estesrockets . Also you can grab a Estes Star Orbiter at Hobby Lobby that has some pro series airframe tube and some balsa fins to paper , fiberglass or toss and replace with plywood for Level 1 motors when you are ready.

    Try to fund and buy a AeroTech 29/180 motor case or AeroTech hobbyline case for mid power flying of the less expensive reloads.

    Kenny



    Sent from my LG-LS997 using Rocketry Forum mobile app
    Last edited by KenRico; 15th November 2017 at 07:45 PM.
    Fiesta Area Rocket Team - San Diego, CA

    TRA# 01113 L3, NAR # 38484 -DART, NAR Section #317
    GHS 2011 PB-X ROCstock XXXV GHS 2012 PB XI ROCstock XXXVII PBXII SPRINGFEST 2014 ROCstock XXXIX Oktoberfest 2014 LASTER Blaster ROCstock XL SPRINGFEST 2015 ROCstock XL1 ROCtober Oktoberfest 2015 LDRS XXXV ROCstock XLIII Holtville HAVOC Springfest 2017 Octoberfest 2017 --> Holtville HAVOC 2 :dark:

  14. #14
    Join Date
    27th December 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    Welcome! First off, I have no idea what you should buy, because I don't know you or your budget. Go troll the Estes site linked above and LOC Precision. What kits speak to you? Do you like the minimum diameter/maximum altitude ones or the bigger ones that have space for electronics? Simple three fins and a nose cone (3FNC) or sci-fi things with pods and stuff all over? The only wrong way to do it is to build something that doesn't excite you.

    I'd suggest sticking with 18mm or 24mm motor mounts for the first rocket you build. That will keep you in the cheaper-ish black powder motors that you can launch on any launch controller you buy. Also keep in mind maximum altitude. How big is your flying field? You shouldn't plan to fly higher than twice the minimum length/width of that field.

    If you go on in the hobby, you probably will get into composite motors which are all kinds of fun to fly. That will probably bring you to a club with equipment and bigger fields.
    NAR L1 "Cheeto Dust", scratch 54mm, H54R (before it became a G54), Mansfield, WA
    L2 "Arc Light", Madcow 2.6" Arcas, J285CL, Mansfield, WA, recovery by snowshoe

  15. #15
    Join Date
    19th January 2009
    Posts
    983
    Welcome. I agree with the general sentiment, get a simple Estes or similar kit to learn the process that you think looks fun to build/fly/whatever. Get a little experience and if you decide you like it, try hitting a club launch so you can see some of the other options before spending money on them.

    As an R/C pilot, you might want to consider Frank's R/C boost glider kits. http://dynasoarrocketry.com/ The motor case for them is a bit pricey, but if you're into R/C you have to be used to that to some degree. And you only need one, unless you lose it..

    Don't hesitate to try a couple types of things and see what matches your interests best. Some of us are into high power, some prefer scale, some prefer contest flying, etc.. There's room for everyone.


    You can 3D print rockets, however, they tend to be a lot heavier than cardboard and balsa designs. There are some files on thingiverse if you want to check them out. I like to use my printer for rocket parts rather than whole rockets. Things like fin cans, nosecones, pods, mounts for electronics, etc.. If you can design parts, you get even more options. It's worth learning CAD for that alone, in my opinion. For example, here are some parts I designed for rocketry.. Most of my stuff is more suitable for larger or more complex flights using electronics, but the options are limitless.

    https://cad.onshape.com/documents/4e...0a7e35ba7d93e3

  16. #16
    Join Date
    18th January 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarvan View Post
    Hey ! I am a 13 y/o boy, expert in RC Flying, Arduino Programming and Shooting. I am new to model rocketry. What should I buy to get started.
    My engineering and electronic skills are Advanced and I even have a 3d Printer (wondering if I can 3d print rockets).
    I'm surprised no one's (edit: except Blackbrandt!) asked where you live (general area, not specifics) as that could have a lot of bearing on what you'll be able to get and where you'll be able to do it.
    Roy Green
    nar12605 L2
    Southern Area Rocketry

  17. #17
    Join Date
    19th December 2015
    Posts
    137

    Did you say Arduino?

    Did you say Arduino?

    Here is a new Arduino-based rocket we’re just starting to experiment with in the lab. This one will eventually fly at a night launch. Trying to keep it “light” enough to fly on E or F motors.

    Any good rocket scientist will find plenty of uses for Arduino in rocketry!

    Welcome to The Rocketry Forum, you're in the right place!


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VyZhRi1zSU
    Sabrina the WildChild
    NAR #94600 Jr L-1
    TRA # 15983-M1 -Proud Member of Tripoli Mentoring Program
    Woosh #558
    TWA - Tripoli Wisconsin

  18. #18
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    25th September 2017
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    Tripoli St., Pittsburgh, PA
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    17
    Thanks a lot everyone. Are there any complete kits that contain everything to fly ie. Motors, Rockets, Igniters, Launchpad, Recovery Wadding.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by K'Tesh View Post
    "LV-2" is actually "Rex R"... Just as I'm "K'Tesh" (and not "OpenRocket Chuck Norris").

    You'll get the hang of it quickly... And once again... Welcome!

    BTW, You're lucky... As an Aspie living and working in China, I can't even get the dogs to understand me
    Oh okay Sorry for that

  20. #20
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    25th September 2017
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    Tripoli St., Pittsburgh, PA
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    I fell in love with model rocketry after seeing this image https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model_...S_0067Crop.jpg

  21. #21
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    27th March 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarvan View Post
    I fell in love with model rocketry after seeing this image https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model_...S_0067Crop.jpg
    Looks like you need to pick up a Saturn V or two (or 3, or ...).

    Estes has one, Dr Zooch has one, Fliskits has one, and I think Semroc has one in the works... I linked to the eRockets site because I'm tired and not feeling up to doing that much searching around (and they have pretty good prices anyway).
    Dreaming of making the rockets I dreamed of as a kid (and then some).


    NAR L1 Cert flight: Sheridan, Oregon, USA. Sept. 19, 2015. Flew Deep Space OFFl on an I357T-14A Blue Thunder

  22. #22
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    25th September 2017
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    Thanks a lot K'Tesh

  23. #23
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    25th September 2017
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    Tripoli St., Pittsburgh, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttabbal View Post
    Welcome. I agree with the general sentiment, get a simple Estes or similar kit to learn the process that you think looks fun to build/fly/whatever. Get a little experience and if you decide you like it, try hitting a club launch so you can see some of the other options before spending money on them.

    As an R/C pilot, you might want to consider Frank's R/C boost glider kits. http://dynasoarrocketry.com/ The motor case for them is a bit pricey, but if you're into R/C you have to be used to that to some degree. And you only need one, unless you lose it..

    Don't hesitate to try a couple types of things and see what matches your interests best. Some of us are into high power, some prefer scale, some prefer contest flying, etc.. There's room for everyone.


    You can 3D print rockets, however, they tend to be a lot heavier than cardboard and balsa designs. There are some files on thingiverse if you want to check them out. I like to use my printer for rocket parts rather than whole rockets. Things like fin cans, nosecones, pods, mounts for electronics, etc.. If you can design parts, you get even more options. It's worth learning CAD for that alone, in my opinion. For example, here are some parts I designed for rocketry.. Most of my stuff is more suitable for larger or more complex flights using electronics, but the options are limitless.

    https://cad.onshape.com/documents/4e...0a7e35ba7d93e3

    Thanks a lot. I bought a DynaSoar RC Plane from my saved pocket money today. Will come in a few days.

  24. #24
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    30th January 2016
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    US > OK > NE
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarvan View Post
    Thanks a lot everyone. Are there any complete kits that contain everything to fly ie. Motors, Rockets, Igniters, Launchpad, Recovery Wadding.
    Not that I'm aware of. Some of the starter kits from Estes come closest with a rocket, launch pad, rod, & controller.

  25. #25
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    14th July 2015
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    Randolph, NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarvan View Post
    Thanks a lot. I bought a DynaSoar RC Plane from my saved pocket money today. Will come in a few days.
    Those are fantastic kits but I would not recommend them as your first rocket. Build and flying a normal rocket (or two or three) first.

  26. #26
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    18th January 2009
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    Atlanta, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarvan View Post
    Thanks a lot everyone. Are there any complete kits that contain everything to fly ie. Motors, Rockets, Igniters, Launchpad, Recovery Wadding.
    There used to be, but due to various shipping restrictions, no longer. Now it’s kits/launcher , then motors/igniters/wadding. Paint and batteries sold separately.


    Sent from my iPhone using Rocketry Forum
    Roy Green
    nar12605 L2
    Southern Area Rocketry

  27. #27
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    6th June 2009
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    Middle of the Mitten, MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by neil_w View Post
    Those are fantastic kits but I would not recommend them as your first rocket. Build and flying a normal rocket (or two or three) first.

    I'd definitely second this suggestion. You're coming in with a pretty advanced technical foundation compared to the average hobby rocketeer, so it's awful tempting to try to scale Mount Everest in the first couple weeks.

    That's a recipe for possible disaster with some real head slapping WhatTheFudgeWasIDoing?? mistakes that can be frustrating and cost money.

    Speaking of money, you'll also find out the boundary points between LPR (Low Power Rocketry), using motors from 1/2A up to E size, MPR (Mid Power Rocketry), F to H motors, and HPR (High Power), which is everything above, represent "warp drive" quantum jumps in construction techniques, COSTS, flying field size demands, COSTS, eventual certification requirements, COSTS, time demands, COSTS, ground support equipment demands, COSTS, costs, and oh yeah... costs.

    Starting out with a couple fairly simple LPR kits and flying with small motors in your local area allows you to get the hang of how rockets work and any mistakes you may make will likely be low-level in cost, damage, etc etc. If you bang up an $8 starter model, no big deal; if you crash a $50 MPR rocket, well, there's $50 out the window (plus probably $20 per motor).

    If you go for one of the LPR starter sets many have already recommended, you can get up and flying within a few days at a local soccer/baseball field at a total cost of $30 bucks, including motors. Really, to get off the ground in MPR or HPR starts at about $100 bucks, and requires a much larger field and serious transportation.

    With advances in video cams, onboard telemetry, etc etc, there is a lot of interesting stuff you can do with LPR models which will all be good foundation if you do decide you want to engage warp engines and take off with the big stuff. Also with LPR it's usually still possible to say, "hey, it's a good day today," throw your gear in one or two storage boxes, and get out and fly. With the big stuff, you pretty much need a week of advance planning, an SUV or trailer full of gear, and an hour's drive or more to your launch site.



    Your profile says you're in Pittsburgh; like most Northern rocketeers you're about to enter the winter hibernation zone which will last until about April. It is possible to fly in freezing conditions but it is definitely not a good environment for a first-ever flyer. Flying in freezing conditions creates a 'combat siege' situation in which everything is done in a complete-panic mode, "let's light this candle," etc etc. Much much better to wait for the first 55 degree day in March and fly then.

    Half the fun of rocketry is the designing, planning and building.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    25th September 2017
    Location
    Tripoli St., Pittsburgh, PA
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    17
    Quote Originally Posted by JStarStar View Post
    I'd definitely second this suggestion. You're coming in with a pretty advanced technical foundation compared to the average hobby rocketeer, so it's awful tempting to try to scale Mount Everest in the first couple weeks.

    That's a recipe for possible disaster with some real head slapping WhatTheFudgeWasIDoing?? mistakes that can be frustrating and cost money.

    Speaking of money, you'll also find out the boundary points between LPR (Low Power Rocketry), using motors from 1/2A up to E size, MPR (Mid Power Rocketry), F to H motors, and HPR (High Power), which is everything above, represent "warp drive" quantum jumps in construction techniques, COSTS, flying field size demands, COSTS, eventual certification requirements, COSTS, time demands, COSTS, ground support equipment demands, COSTS, costs, and oh yeah... costs.

    Starting out with a couple fairly simple LPR kits and flying with small motors in your local area allows you to get the hang of how rockets work and any mistakes you may make will likely be low-level in cost, damage, etc etc. If you bang up an $8 starter model, no big deal; if you crash a $50 MPR rocket, well, there's $50 out the window (plus probably $20 per motor).

    If you go for one of the LPR starter sets many have already recommended, you can get up and flying within a few days at a local soccer/baseball field at a total cost of $30 bucks, including motors. Really, to get off the ground in MPR or HPR starts at about $100 bucks, and requires a much larger field and serious transportation.

    With advances in video cams, onboard telemetry, etc etc, there is a lot of interesting stuff you can do with LPR models which will all be good foundation if you do decide you want to engage warp engines and take off with the big stuff. Also with LPR it's usually still possible to say, "hey, it's a good day today," throw your gear in one or two storage boxes, and get out and fly. With the big stuff, you pretty much need a week of advance planning, an SUV or trailer full of gear, and an hour's drive or more to your launch site.



    Your profile says you're in Pittsburgh; like most Northern rocketeers you're about to enter the winter hibernation zone which will last until about April. It is possible to fly in freezing conditions but it is definitely not a good environment for a first-ever flyer. Flying in freezing conditions creates a 'combat siege' situation in which everything is done in a complete-panic mode, "let's light this candle," etc etc. Much much better to wait for the first 55 degree day in March and fly then.

    Half the fun of rocketry is the designing, planning and building.



    Thanks a lot. Yes, the cold will start soon here. This cold is making me feel extremely bored- I can't fly my RC Plane, Can't drive my RC Car or do Plinking with my Air-Rifle. The only thing helping me to keep my Sanity is Computer Programming.

  29. #29
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    25th September 2017
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    Flying in freezing conditions creates a 'combat siege' situation in which everything is done in a complete-panic mode, "let's light this candle," etc etc.
    Oh yes. I have ruined countless RC Nitro engines due to this. Here in Pittsburgh, we have a harsh snowstorm coming.

  30. #30
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    25th September 2017
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    Oh by the way, what does B-2, A-6,etc mean??


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